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This page lists all program learning goals, alphabetically by program. A separate index page organizes the programs by type and organization.

Academic Advising: Pre-Major Advising

The student will

  1. Responsibility (Knowledge and Action):
    1. Be familiar with the University’s integrative curriculum, policies, and campus resources;
    2. Know curricular requirements for intended program of study and draft a tentative academic plan leading to major declaration by spring of sophomore year;
    3. Know how to run a degree audit and bring an updated audit to advising meetings;
    4. Monitor academic progress in courses and towards degree completion;
  2. Reflection (Discernment)
    1. Align one’s academic plan with one’s interests, goals, talents, and values;
    2. Recover from mistakes and change plans as necessary;
  3. Engagement (External and Social)
    1. Build connections with the University community; and
    2. Make full use of University resources.

 

Academic Advising: Major Advising

The student will

  1. Establish and Monitor (Direction and Ownership):
    1. Know major requirements and departmental expectations and procedures;
    2. Understand connections between major study and the general education curriculum;
    3. Formulate, monitor, and modify, as necessary, an academic plan that unifies educational, personal, and professional interests, strengths, and aspirations;
    4. Monitor progress toward on-time degree completion by regularly reviewing a degree evaluation in consultation with one’s advisor;
    5. Understand and follow University policies and procedures for Graduation;
  1. Explore and Extend (Enrichment and Reflection):
    1. Explore co-curricular and professional-development opportunities, such as research, study abroad, internships, practicums, and service learning;
    2. Select courses and integrate co-curricular experiences meaningfully and intentionally;
    3. Discuss post-graduation plans, which may include graduate school, careers, or service; and
    4. Reflect on one’s education broadly at the University.

 

Accountancy

Students will

  1. be prepared for a career in professional accounting and licensure as Certified Public Accountants;
  2. have a working knowledge of the functional areas in accounting;
  3. develop an understanding of professional codes of conduct in accounting (e.g., public and managerial accounting);
  4. develop an understanding of various aspects of global business;
  5. develop an understanding of various aspects of information technology; and
  6. solve accounting problems using appropriate analytical techniques.

The academic foundation should allow graduating Accountancy majors to:

  1. enter a career in professional accounting;
  2. enter a quality graduate program in a variety of fields, especially in business; and
  3. obtain professional certification in public accounting or related fields (e.g. Certified Public Accountant (CPA)).

See also the AACSB Accounting Standards.

 

Accountancy (graduate)

Students will

  1. enhance their understanding of accounting concepts and application of appropriate research tools to develop effective solutions to accounting problems;
  2. demonstrate critical thinking skills necessary for identifying and addressing complex interdisciplinary situations including ethical dilemmas;
  3. enhance their ability to communicate effectively through oral presentations and writing assignments;
  4. develop diverse perspectives of global business through civic and global learning; and
  5. gain a broad, integrative, perspective of the functional areas in accounting through applied and collaborative learning.

See also the AACSB Accounting Standards.

 

Actuarial Science (minor)

New Program

 

Arrupe Scholars Program

Students will

  1. Develop their intellectual curiosity;
  2. Be reflective learners;
  3. Demonstrate a commitment to social action grounded in sustained engagement with people facing injustice; and
  4. Apply their knowledge and abilities to advocate for positive social change.

 

Art History

Students will

  1. Recognize and understand major artists and monuments of world art, and be able to identify the characteristics and distinguishing features of works of art and architecture in their historical and cultural settings. They will learn to make comparisons across cultures and time periods, leading to an understanding of art and culture within a global context.
  2. Demonstrate a knowledge of vocabulary specific to the visual arts and develop a proficiency in visual literacy that will prepare them for graduate study and/or careers in the visual arts, architecture, the media, and related fields.
  3. Engage with the curatorial and institutional dimensions of art collections and exhibitions by studying at local cultural institutions, including the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art.
  4. Be able to locate, interpret, and analyze primary and secondary sources relevant to solving research problems in the visual arts.
  5. Recognize, understand, and apply critical, theoretical, and methodological approaches to the history of representation understood within broader socio-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Biology

Students will

  1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of biology and develop competency in specific areas of interest;
    • Understand the basic chemical principles, cell structure and organization, and metabolism of living organisms.
    • Understand plant and animal anatomy and physiology, with an emphasis on form and function.
    • Understand the diversity of organisms, systematic biology and phylogeny, and biological interactions over geological time.
    • Understand the principles of molecular, transmission, quantitative, evolutionary, and population genetics.
    • Understand the theory of evolution by natural selection.
  2. use an empirical approach to evaluate biological phenomena; and
  3. communicate biological knowledge effectively.

 

Biology (M.A.)

Students will

  1. demonstrate a deep knowledge of biology and develop advanced competency in specific areas of interest consistent with the primary focus of the program that the students develop with their faculty-based committee;
  2. demonstrate a deep knowledge of how to use an empirical approach (with appropriate methods, experimental design, and data analysis) to evaluate biological phenomena in new ways; and
  3. communicate new biological knowledge effectively in written, oral, and visual formats.

 

Biology (M.S.)

Students will

  1. demonstrate a deep knowledge of biology and develop advanced competency in specific areas of interest consistent with the primary focus of the program that the students develop with their faculty-based committee;
  2. demonstrate a deep knowledge of how to use an empirical approach (with appropriate methods, experimental design, and data analysis) to evaluate biological phenomena in new ways;
  3. communicate new biological knowledge (typically obtained during thesis research) effectively in written, oral, and visual formats; and
  4. demonstrate the ability to conceive, design, implement, and complete original scientific research.

 

Biology (minor)

Students will

  1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of biology and develop competency in specific areas of interest;
    • Understand the basic chemical principles, cell structure and organization, and metabolism of living organisms.
    • Understand plant and animal anatomy and physiology, with an emphasis on form and function.
    • Understand the diversity of organisms, systematic biology and phylogeny, and biological interactions over geological time.
    • Understand the theory of evolution by natural selection.
  2. use an empirical approach to evaluate biological phenomena; and
  3. communicate biological knowledge effectively.

 

Boler College of Business

GOAL 1: Our students will have ethical reasoning skills.

Objectives:
a. Our students will recognize and explain ethical issues that arise in business.
b. Our students will apply relevant ethical knowledge to ethical issues they identify.
c. Our students will analyze various positions (including the Jesuit, Catholic perspective) one might hold regarding ethical issues in business.
d. Our students will evaluate various positions (including the Jesuit, Catholic perspective) one might hold regarding ethical issues in business.

GOAL 2: Our students will have and use knowledge of all functional areas in business.

Objectives:
a. Our students will identify relevant basic business knowledge and institutions.
b. Our students will use appropriately key business knowledge and measures.
c. Our students will assemble and organize appropriate information for business decision making.
d. Our students will generate and justify business decisions.

GOAL 3: Our students will have communication skills.

Objectives for oral presentations:
a. Our students will know and recognize relevant basic components of an effective oral presentation.
b. Our students will apply basic standards/skills in delivering an oral presentation.
c. Our students will differentiate levels of effectiveness in oral presentations.
d. Our students will evaluate and create oral presentations that achieve intended outcomes.

Objectives for written documents:
a. Our students will know and recognize relevant basic components of a well written document.
b. Our students will apply basic standards/skills in developing a written document.
c. Our students will differentiate levels of effectiveness in written documents.
d. Our students will evaluate and create written documents that achieve intended outcomes.

GOAL 4: Our students will have critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Objectives:
a. Our students will identify and define relevant authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
b. Our students will use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.
c. Our students will collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
d. Our students will plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.

GOAL 5: Our students will have a global perspective.

Objectives:
a. Our students will display knowledge of global ideas and institutions.
b. Our students will use appropriately key global knowledge and measures.
c. Our students will analyze implications of global policies.
d. Our students will generate and justify business decisions in a global context.

GOAL 6: Our students will have knowledge, skills, and abilities appropriate to their major. (These vary by major)

These learning goals apply to all students in programs offered by the Boler College of Business, in International Business with Language and Culture, and in the Business minor.

See also the AACSB Business Standards.

 

 

Campus Ministry

 

Catholic Studies (minor)

Students will:

  1. Think critically about Catholicism by
    1. assessing the strengths and weaknesses of theological and historical arguments;
    2. examining critically core texts, works of literature, or works of art that originate in the Catholic intellectual and cultural traditions;
    3. employing these sources properly in fashioning their own understanding of Catholicism;
  2. Articulate multiple perspectives on current issues in catholic life, drawing on scholarly and professional perspectives.
  3. Become effective writers and public speakers who can clearly and elegantly express a complex argument on major issues facing contemporary Catholic life.

Demonstrate the qualities necessary for leadership and service within Catholic contexts that are increasingly diverse.

 

Cell and Molecular Biology

Students will

  1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of biology and develop competency in specific areas of interest;
  2. Understand the basic chemical principles, cell structure and organization, and metabolism of living organisms.
  3. Understand plant and animal anatomy and physiology, with an emphasis on form and function.
  4. Understand the principles of molecular, transmission, quantitative, evolutionary, and population genetics.
  5. Understand cell signaling, regulation of protein function, eukaryotic cell cycle control, and cancer.
  6. Understand gene and genome analysis, genome organization, transposable elements, chromosome structure, replication and expression of genetic information in eukaryotes.
  7. use an empirical approach to evaluate biological phenomena; and
  8. analyze biological data and communicate its importance through effective oral and written presentation.

 

Center for Career Services

undergoing restructuring

 

Center for Global Education

undergoing restructuring

 

The Center for Service and Social Action

Students will:

  • Apply and deepen knowledge through engaged experiential learning.
  • Increase students’ knowledge of community issues, needs, strengths, challenges, and resources.
  • Develop competency to challenge uncritical assumptions about the lives of others, especially those living in poverty and on the margins.
  • Cultivate a habit of reflection about the meaning of service in their lives and how their service experience informs their vocation.
  • Develop an awareness of civic responsibility.
  • Engage in advocacy work that fosters solidarity.
  • Engage in activities that advance the promotion of justice and social action.
  • Create a genuine understanding of others’ lived experiences through significant, ongoing personal interactions.
  • Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression.

 

Chemistry

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a working knowledge in the sub-disciplines of chemistry where they have completed coursework: organic, analytical, physical, and inorganic or biochemistry;
  2. Apply their integrative knowledge of chemistry to solve problems;
  3. Demonstrate competency in the laboratory skills necessary to acquire, analyze and interpret experimental results; and
  4. Effectively communicate scientific information in a variety of forms (written, oral, mathematical).

See also the ACS Guidelines.

 

Chemistry: Biochemistry

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a working knowledge in the sub-disciplines of chemistry where they have completed coursework: organic, analytical, physical, and biochemistry;
  2. Apply their integrative knowledge of chemistry to solve problems;
  3. Demonstrate competency in the laboratory skills necessary to acquire, analyze and interpret experimental results; and
  4. Effectively communicate scientific information in a variety of forms (written, oral, mathematical).

See also the ACS Guidelines.

 

Chemistry: Chemical Physics

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a working knowledge in the sub-disciplines of chemistry where they have completed coursework: organic, analytical, physical, inorganic, and biochemistry;
  2. Apply their integrative knowledge of chemistry to solve problems;
  3. Demonstrate competency in the laboratory skills necessary to acquire, analyze and interpret experimental results; and
  4. Effectively communicate scientific information in a variety of forms (written, oral, mathematical).

See also the ACS Guidelines.

 

Chemistry (minor)

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a working knowledge in the sub-disciplines of chemistry where they have completed coursework: organic, analytical, and physical;
  2. Apply their integrative knowledge of chemistry to solve problems;
  3. Demonstrate competency in the laboratory skills necessary to acquire, analyze and interpret experimental results; and
  4. Effectively communicate scientific information in a variety of forms (written, oral, mathematical).

See also the ACS Guidelines.

 

Classical Languages

Students will be able to

  1. Communicate
    1. At the superior level in interpretive reading in Latin and/or Greek;
    2. At the advanced high level in presentational writing in Latin and/or Greek;
    3. Skillfully in English.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge about the literature of ancient Mediterranean societies and one of the following areas:
    1. History,
    2. Art history/material culture, and
    3. Philosophy;
  3. Apply critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation; and
  4. Explore modes of religious experience in the ancient world by reading religious texts (such as the New Testament or Augustine) in the original language.

Note: Proficiency levels are explained here.

 

Classical Studies

Students will be able to

  1. Communicate
    1. At the advanced low level in interpretive reading in Latin or Greek;
    2. At the intermediate high level in presentational writing in Latin or Greek;
    3. Skillfully in English.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge about ancient Mediterranean societies in at least three of the following areas:
    1. History,
    2. Art history/material culture,
    3. Philosophy, and
    4. Literature;
  3. Apply critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation; and
  4. Explore modes of religious experience in the ancient world by completing a course in theology and religious studies.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance. Proficiency levels are explained here.

 

Clinical Mental Health Counseling (M.A.)

Students will

  1. Identify as a clinical mental health counselor who is knowledgeable about the history and development of the clinical mental health counseling profession, is aware of the challenges facing the profession, and is prepared to advocate for the profession.
  2. Assess, evaluate, and diagnose clients using assessment instruments and the DSM.
  3. Determine, based on the assessment and diagnosis, an appropriate treatment plan for clients.
  4. Implement interventions and treatment plan, and continuously assess the effectiveness of the intervention.

Note: The Counseling (graduate) learning goal also apply to students in this program.

 

Communication and Theatre Arts

undergoing restructuring

 

Communication and Theatre Arts: Communication Studies

undergoing restructuring

 

Communication and Theatre Arts: Digital Media

undergoing restructuring

 

Communication and Theatre Arts: Integrated Marketing Communication

undergoing restructuring

 

Computer Science

Students will

  1. Develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills and use these skills to solve complex computing problems;
  2. Acquire a working knowledge of the theoretical foundations of computer science;
  3. Acquire both a working knowledge and a theoretical understanding of the professional practice and formal methodologies of development of large software projects; and
  4. Acquire communication and interpersonal skills necessary to perform effectively in a technical environment.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Computer Science with Healthcare Information Technology

Students will

  1. Develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills and use these skills to solve complex computing problems;
  2. Acquire a working knowledge of the theoretical foundations of computer science;
  3. Acquire both a working knowledge and a theoretical understanding of the professional practice and formal methodologies of development of large software projects; and
  4. Acquire communication and interpersonal skills necessary to perform effectively in a technical environment.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Counseling (graduate)

Students will

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the major principles of research design and program evaluation. Evaluate research reports for methodological and statistical appropriateness.
  2. Apply basic counseling and facilitative communication skills in individual and small group settings.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of counseling theories, and evidence-based counseling approaches. Appropriately apply various theoretical approaches when working with clients and/or students.
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the psychosocial foundations of human development, behavior and learning, and apply that knowledge when working with clients and/or students.
  5. Counsel and advocate for individuals from diverse social, cultural, sexual orientation and economic backgrounds with an awareness of how discrimination and societal expectations can impact healthy psychological development and the counseling process.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of group process and procedures by describing and analyzing group process, and by applying basic techniques of group counseling.
  7. Conduct a developmentally appropriate career exploration and assessment that demonstrates an understanding of career development theory and the career counseling process.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to select and evaluate assessment instruments for possible use with clients and/or students.
  9. Model legal and ethical understanding of the ASCA or ACA ethical standards. Demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate ethical code and of the ethical decision making process.

 

Data Science

new program

 

East Asian Studies

Students will

  1. Demonstrate at least second-year language proficiency (ACTFL’s intermediate-mid) in an East Asian language;
  2. Identify common elements of the East Asian region, as well as differences within the region based on society and culture;
  3. Analyze an East Asian society from at least three disciplinary perspectives (including, but not limited to, anthropology, art history, economics, history, literature and the arts, political science, religious studies and sociology);
  4. Understand the role of artists, the arts and the artistic impulse in society and recognize how history, politics, religion, philosophy, science and technology influence art and how art influences history, politics, religion, philosophy, science and technology; and
  5. Articulate the political, economic, and sociocultural relationships among East Asian nations and between the East Asia and other regions.

Note: The major and minors have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Economics

Students will have the

  1. Knowledge of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory;
  2. Skills necessary to define and analyze economic problems;
  3. Ability to articulate economic problems and pose appropriate solutions to problems that are unfamiliar to them; and
  4. Ability to recognize limitations of suggested solutions and deal with ambiguity that surrounds many situations.

Upon graduation, the program embodied in the Economics major should create a sufficiently strong knowledge base and skill set that graduates are well prepared to pursue the following options:

  1. enter a career in the private sector;
  2. enter a quality graduate program in economics, business, or law, among other options; or
  3. enter a career in the not-for-profit sector.

Note: These learning goals apply to both the B.A. and the B.S.E. degree in Economics. Students receiving the B.S.E. must take the Boler core; and, therefore, learning goals differ between the two degrees because B.S.E. students are also expected to meet the Boler learning goals.

 

Education

 

Engineering Physics

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the core principles and concepts of physics, and gain understanding in selected additional advanced topics in engineering;
  2. Apply mathematical, analytical, computational, and experimental skills to model the behavior of physical systems, solve a wide range of physics problems, design and conduct experiments to measure and interpret physical phenomena, and to critically evaluate scientific results and arguments, both of their own and that of others;
  3. Effectively communicate scientific hypothesis, research methods, data and analysis both orally and in writing and in a variety of venues;
  4. Demonstrate awareness of professional responsibilities and good citizenship as members of the scientific community; and
  5. Be prepared to enter graduate school or employment appropriate to their chosen career path.

 

English (M.A.)

Students will

  1. Analyze and evaluate texts to form and articulate accomplished interpretations of those texts.
  2. Produce extended written analyses of literary texts, informed by research, that demonstrate awareness of audience, knowledge of critical theory, understanding of formal elements of language and genre, formulation of an original question or thesis within the field, sophisticated organization, and clear and persuasive argumentation.
  3. Build oral communication skills by listening to others’ ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in a larger critical and/or theoretical conversation that begins in but extends beyond the classroom.
  4. Incorporate knowledge of cultural and historical contexts of Anglophone and translated creative works into original interpretations of those works.

 

English: Creative Writing

Students will

  1. Read texts with active, critical skill to form and articulate accomplished interpretations of those texts.
  2. Produce multiple drafts of original creative works that are honed and revised through the peer workshop process.
  3. Produce written analyses of creative texts that demonstrate awareness of audience, artistic form, organizational sophistication, and clear argumentation.
  4. Recognize the employment and contextual use of the formal elements of language and genre.
  5. Build oral communication skills by listening to others’ ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in the conversation.
  6. Show knowledge of cultural and historical contexts of Anglophone and translated creative works.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

English: Creative Writing (M.A.)

Students will

  1. Analyze and evaluate texts to form and articulate accomplished interpretations of those texts.
  2. Produce extended written analyses of literary texts, informed by research, that demonstrate awareness of audience, knowledge of critical theory, understanding of formal elements of language and genre, formulation of an original question or thesis within the field, sophisticated organization, and clear and persuasive argumentation.
  3. Build oral communication skills by listening to others’ ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in a larger critical and/or theoretical conversation that begins in but extends beyond the classroom.
  4. Incorporate knowledge of cultural and historical contexts of Anglophone and translated creative works into original interpretations of those works.
  5. Produce major and minor written works, demonstrate an understanding of the genre-specific uses of style and form in creative writing, and acquire an ability to use the self- and peer-revision processes to identify holistic and line-specific opportunities for improving creative texts.

 

English: Literature

Students will

  1. Read texts with active, critical skill to form and articulate accomplished interpretations of those texts.
  2. Produce written analyses of literary texts that demonstrate awareness of audience, organizational sophistication, and clear argumentation.
  3. Recognize the employment and contextual use of the formal elements of language and genre.
  4. Build oral communication skills by listening to others’ ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in the conversation.
  5. Show knowledge of cultural and historical contexts of Anglophone and translated creative works.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

English: Professional Writing

Students will

  1. Read texts with active, critical skill to form and articulate accomplished interpretations of those texts.
  2. Produce written texts that represent professional genres and demonstrate awareness of audience, artistic form, organizational sophistication, and clear argumentation.
  3. Recognize the employment and contextual use of the formal elements of language and genre.
  4. Build oral communication skills by listening to others’ ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in the conversation.
  5. Complete at least one professional internship that employs writing, editing, and communicating skills learned in PRW courses.

 

English: Rhetoric and Composition (M.A.)

Students will

  1. Analyze and evaluate texts to form and articulate accomplished interpretations of those texts.
  2. Produce extended written analyses of literary texts, informed by research, that demonstrate awareness of audience, knowledge of critical theory, understanding of formal elements of language and genre, formulation of an original question or thesis within the field, sophisticated organization, and clear and persuasive argumentation.
  3. Build oral communication skills by listening to others’ ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in a larger critical and/or theoretical conversation that begins in but extends beyond the classroom.
  4. Incorporate knowledge of cultural and historical contexts of Anglophone and translated creative works into original interpretations of those works.
  5. Demonstrate understanding of contemporary composition pedagogy and theory, including core issues, debates, research, history, ethics, and technology.

 

Entrepreneurship (minor)

Students will

  1. Develop creativity/innovative thinking;
  2. Develop critical thinking analysis;
  3. Develop group collaborative skills;
  4. Communicate skillfully in presenting entrepreneurship projects; and
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of the business model concept.

 

Environment Science

Students will

  1. demonstrate a broad knowledge of environmental science and develop competency in biology, chemistry, and Earth science;
  2. Understand the basic chemical principles, cell structure and organization, and metabolism of living organisms.
  3. Understand plant and animal anatomy and physiology, with an emphasis on form and function.
  4. Understand the diversity of organisms, systematic biology and phylogeny, and biological interactions over geological time.
  5. Understand the role of evolution in generating the diversity of form and function seen in life on Earth.
  6. Understanding the role of the environment in determining the outcome of biological interactions.
  7. Identifying the consequences of environmental changes arising from human activities.
  8. use critical thinking to evaluate and interpret biological and environmental phenomena;
  9. Critically assess and accurately interpret scientific data presented in visual or tabular form.
  10. Identify the scientific underpinnings of current environmentally-themed news. And
  11. collect and analyze scientific data and communicate its importance through effective oral and written presentation.
  12. Demonstrate competence in conducting original research.
  13. Present research results orally and in writing.

 

Exercise Science

Students will demonstrate

  1. Knowledge of the structure and function of the human body;
  2. Knowledge of history, philosophy, mission, personal and professional identity;
  3. Knowledge of lifespan development, developmental disabilities, and developmental regression;
  4. Knowledge of movement skills, motor skills, fitness skills and sports skills development and learning;
  5. Knowledge of health, lifestyle wellness, lifestyle disabilities and working with diverse populations;
  6. Knowledge of organization, Leadership and Planning for a variety of situations;
  7. Knowledge of research and the appropriate use of research in papers, projects, and for problem-solving and critical thinking;
  8. Knowledge in applied settings; and
  9. Knowledge related to moral and ethical behavior for a movement professional

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

The Fifth Year M.B.A.

The 5th Year MBA program is designed to develop in students the skill sets necessary to be successful in a variety of management situations. Specifically, the program is designed so that graduates of our program will demonstrate:

  1. Managerial level knowledge of the functional areas of business;
  2. The application of analytic and quantitative teachniques to solving business problems;
    1. The identification of appropriate analytical techniques for defining and understanding a problem;
    2. The ability to identify multiple solutions to a problem based on analytical insights;
    3. The ability to connect activities of an organization to the financial performance of the firm.
  3. Effective influential communication skills for oral presentations and written communication;
    1. The ability to effectively communicate quantitative and qualitative information during oral presentations
    2. The ability to effectively communicate quantitative and qualitative information in written form
  4. Effective leadership of self and others in problem solving situations;
    1. An understanding of their own personal work style and the factors that affect their effectiveness in different work settings
    2. The ability to craft an effective leadership plan of action for a given situation
  5. The evaluation of the ethical dimensions of business problems and the application of an ethical framework while solving business problems;
    1. The identification of ethical aspects of business problems
    2. The inclusion of ethical aspects of business problems during analysis of business problems
    3. The application of an ethical framework while effectively solving business problems
  6. The application of multiple aspects of social responsibility in solving business problems
    1. The application of the triple bottom line (financial, social, environmental) while solving business problems
    2. Consideration during problem solving for those who are marginalized in society

 

Finance

Students will have

  1. knowledge of financial accounting, financial markets, financial instruments, and financial theories;
  2. skills necessary to define and solve familiar financial management problems;
  3. ability to articulate financial problems and pose appropriate solutions to problems that are unfamiliar;
  4. ability to recognize limitations of suggested solutions and deal with ambiguity inherent in many situations.

The academic foundation should allow graduating Finance majors to:

  1. enter a career in financial management and have the potential to lead;
  2. enter a quality graduate program in a variety of fields, especially in business; and
  3. seek further professional certification in the field of finance or a related field. (Examples include Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA), Certified Financial Planner (CFP), Certified Financial Manager (CFM), and Certified Managerial Accountant (CMA)).

 

French: French Language

Students will be able to

  1. Communicate skillfully and effectively at the advanced mid level of proficiency in French:
    1. engage in effective interpersonal communication;
    2. engage in effective interpretive listening;
    3. engage in effective interpretive reading;
    4. engage in effective presentational speaking;
    5. engage in effective presentational writing.
  2. Demonstrate foundational cultural and linguistic knowledge of a target-language area;
    1. demonstrate knowledge of features of the culture of a target-language area, such as its art, literature, music, film, popular culture, tradition, and customs;
    2. demonstrate knowledge of how aspects of the history, politics, religion, or geography of a target-language area relate to its culture;
    3. compare linguistic features of the target language with those of English;
    4. compare the culture and society of the target-language area with one’s own.
  3. Demonstrate emerging intercultural competence.
    1. demonstrate an awareness of the interplay of personal identity and culture;
    2. interpret an event, cultural product, or issue from the perspective of a worldview outside their own.

 

French: French Studies

Students will be able to

  1. Communicate skillfully and effectively at the advanced low level of proficiency in French:
    1. engage in effective interpersonal communication;
    2. engage in effective interpretive listening;
    3. engage in effective interpretive reading;
    4. engage in effective presentational speaking;
    5. engage in effective presentational writing.
  2. Demonstrate foundational cultural and linguistic knowledge of a target-language area;
    1. demonstrate knowledge of features of the culture of a target-language area, such as its art, literature, music, film, popular culture, tradition, and customs;
    2. demonstrate knowledge of how aspects of the history, politics, religion, or geography of a target-language area relate to its culture;
    3. compare linguistic features of the target language with those of English;
    4. compare the culture and society of the target-language area with one’s own.
  3. Demonstrate emerging intercultural competence.
    1. demonstrate an awareness of the interplay of personal identity and culture;
    2. interpret an event, cultural product, or issue from the perspective of a worldview outside their own.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Gender, Sexuality, & Women’s Studies

Students will

  1. Recognize how the social and cultural constructions of gender have shaped the experiences of men and women historically and geographically;
  2. Understand connections between gender and power in a global context;
  3. Examine gender roles from multiple perspectives and disciplines;
  4. Evaluate feminist critical scholarship and methodologies;
  5. Analyze the connections between gender inequalities and other forms of discrimination (race, class, ethnicity, etc.);
  6. Develop abilities and skills to deal positively and effectively with gender issues; and
  7. Appreciate the ethical and social justice dimensions and implications of the study of gender.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

German (minor)

Students will be able to

  1. Communicate skillfully and effectively in German:
    1. engage in effective interpersonal communication;
    2. engage in effective interpretive listening;
    3. engage in effective interpretive reading;
    4. engage in effective presentational speaking;
    5. engage in effective presentational writing.
  2. Demonstrate foundational cultural and linguistic knowledge of a target-language area;
    1. demonstrate knowledge of features of the culture of a target-language area, such as its art, literature, music, film, popular culture, tradition, and customs;
    2. demonstrate knowledge of how aspects of the history, politics, religion, or geography of a target-language area relate to its culture;
    3. compare linguistic features of the target language with those of English;
    4. compare the culture and society of the target-language area with one’s own.
  3. Demonstrate emerging intercultural competence.
    1. demonstrate an awareness of the interplay of personal identity and culture;
    2. interpret an event, cultural product, or issue from the perspective of a worldview outside their own.

 

Graduate Studies Learning Goals

All graduate programs at John Carroll University are committed to living the University Learning Goals in a manner appropriate for graduate education. Intellectual goals reflect the disciplinary focus and greater depth of post-baccalaureate education. Character is developed and shaped through emphases on globalism and diversity and expressed through service. Leadership, conceived broadly, encompasses ethical decision making and collaborative skills.

All graduates of John Carroll University graduate programs will:

  • Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the discipline that extends beyond that attained at the undergraduate level
  • Develop habits of critical analysis that can be applied to essential questions, issues, and problems within the field
  • Apply creative and innovative thinking to critical issues in the field
  • Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression
  • Understand and promote social justice
  • Apply a framework for examining ethical dilemmas of a particular field of study
  • Employ leadership and collaborative skills

 

Grasselli Library

Students will

  1. Utilize library resources virtually and through their coursework;
  2. Evaluate information and use it ethically; and
  3. Find information efficiently and effectively.

 

History

Students will

  1. Think critically by a) assessing the strengths and weaknesses of historical arguments, b) critically interrogating primary and secondary sources, and c) employing these sources properly in fashioning their own historical arguments;
  2. Become competent researchers who can discover pertinent primary and secondary sources;
  3. Become effective writers who can clearly and elegantly express a complex, thesis-driven historical argument;
  4. Develop skills in public speaking and oral presentation.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Honors Program

Honors Program graduates are characterized by excellence in

  1. Critical and integrative thinking.
  2. Active engagement within and beyond the classroom.
  3. Reflection and discernment in the Ignatian tradition.
  4. Effective and eloquent communication.

 

Humanities

Students will

  1. Recognize and understand major artists and monuments of world art, and be able to identify the characteristics and distinguishing features of works of art and architecture in their historical and cultural settings. They will learn to make comparisons across cultures and time periods, leading to an understanding of art and culture within a global context.
  2. Demonstrate a knowledge of vocabulary specific to the visual arts and develop a proficiency in visual literacy that will prepare them for graduate study and/or careers in the visual arts, architecture, the media, and related fields.
  3. Integrate the knowledge of various Humanities disciplines in a unique fashion by creating, with the supervision of a faculty advisor, a self-designed major that integrates coursework from the following areas: Art History, Literature, History, Theology and Religious Studies, and/or Philosophy.
  4. Engage with the curatorial and institutional dimensions of art collections and exhibitions by studying at local cultural institutions, including the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art.
  5. Be able to locate, interpret, and analyze primary and secondary sources relevant to solving research problems in the visual arts.
  6. Recognize, understand, and apply critical, theoretical, and methodological approaches to the history of representation understood within broader socio-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Humanities (M.A.)

The students will

  1. Integrate at least two disciplines in a sound interdisciplinary project.
  2. Demonstrate a level of critical thinking, data analysis, and use of sources that situates this project in the scholarship of the selected field(s).
  3. Demonstrate a professional level of writing and oral presentation skills (eloquentia perfecta).

 

Interdisciplinary Neuroscience (concentration)

The students will have

  1. Fundamental knowledge of the core areas of neuroscience;
  2. Development of critical thinking skills related to neuroscience and applied to a neuroscience research topic;
  3. Proficiency in the use of the language of neuroscience in both written and oral forms;
  4. Mastery of the experimental method and statistical analysis;and
  5. Readiness for graduate study, professional school, or for transition into the work force.

 

Interdisciplinary Physics

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the core principles and concepts of physics and gain additional knowledge from complementary areas of biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, psychological science, or business;
  2. Apply mathematical, analytical, computational, and experimental skills to model the behavior of physical systems, solve a wide range of physics problems, design and conduct experiments to measure and interpret physical phenomena, and to critically evaluate scientific results and arguments, both of their own and that of others;
  3. Effectively communicate scientific hypothesis, research methods, data and analysis both orally and in writing and in a variety of venues;
  4. Demonstrate awareness of professional responsibilities and good citizenship as members of the scientific community; and
  5. Be prepared to enter graduate school or employment appropriate to their chosen career path.

 

International Business with Language and Culture

Students will

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in a second language.
    1. Demonstrate proficiency in speaking a second language at the Intermediate High Level.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in reading and writing a second language at the Intermediate High Level.
  2. Achieve a level of intercultural competency.
    1. Express an understanding of cultural variations in behavior and values.
    2. Students will exhibit sensitivity to those cultural variations.
  3. Acquire the ability to analyze international business contexts
    1. Have basic functional knowledge of international business contexts (e.g., markets & market structures, financial arrangements, currencies, transactions, logistics, regulatory issues, etc.).
    2. Be able to use their knowledge of international business contexts to define the constraints and opportunities in international business contexts.
  4. Be able to analyze change, risk and uncertainty in international settings.
    1. Understand the unique aspects of change, risk and uncertainty in international business settings.
    2. Understand how change, risk and uncertainty will affect the performance of people, products, and organizations across cultures.
  5. Be able to problem solve in organizations across cultures.
    1. Be able to identify the layers of complexity in defining a business problem across different cultures.
    2. Be able to develop effective solutions to business problems in varied international settings.

 

Leadership Development (minor)

Students will

  1. Possess a conceptual understanding of leadership theory and practices;
  2. Be aware of personal strengths they bring to leadership roles;
  3. Understand leadership roles and change in various contexts; and
  4. Have demonstrated significant leadership and reflected on the experience(s).

Note: All students in the Leadership Scholars program complete the Leadership Development minor.

 

The Learning Commons

Students will

  1. Seek out academic support services as necessary.

 

Library Instruction

Students will

  1. Evaluate information ethically;
  2. Use and cite information sources accurately; and
  3. Find information efficiently and effectively.

 

Management and Human Resources

currently restructuring

 

Marketing

Students will have

  1. A command of the primary marketing content areas including the marketing environment, segmentation, targeting, positioning, the marketing mix and socially responsible marketing;
  2. The skills necessary to identify and solve problems in marketing;
  3. The ability to navigate the complexities of marketing problems in the dynamic market environments of for-profit and non-profit organizations;
  4. The ability to apply data-driven decisions to address marketing problems and develop effective marketing strategies to sustain the success of an organization. This includes the following:
    1. The ability to identify and analyze marketplace needs
    2. The ability to recognize organizational resources that can fulfill marketplace needs
    3. The ability to develop marketing strategy to effectively connect organizational resources to marketplace needs

The academic foundation should allow graduating Marketing majors to:

  1. enter a career in marketing, or managerial area requiring functional skills in marketing, in either a for-profit, non-profit, or entrepreneurial setting; or enter a quality graduate program in a variety of interdisciplinary fields;
  2. augment their marketing foundation with career choices that enable the student to design and innovate sustainable marketing solutions in complex marketplaces; and
  3. be able to ethically address complex marketing issues

 

Mathematics

Students will

  1. Develop an in-depth integrated knowledge in algebra, geometry, and analysis;
  2. Be able to communicate mathematical ideas and present mathematical arguments both in writing and orally using proper use of mathematical notation and terminology;
  3. Be able to distinguish coherent mathematical arguments from fallacious ones, and to construct complete formal arguments of previously seen or closely-related results;
  4. Be able to give complete solutions to previously seen or closely-related problems;
  5. Be able to use definitions, theorems, and techniques learned to solve problems they haven’t seen before;
  6. Be able to synthesize material from multiple perspectives and make connections with other areas; and
  7. Be able to use technology appropriate to each topic.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Mathematics (M.A.)

Students will

  1. Develop an in-depth integrated knowledge of topics related to the high school mathematics curriculum.;
  2. Be able to gain advanced competence in communicating mathematical ideas and presenting mathematical arguments both in writing and orally using proper use of mathematical notation and terminology;
  3. Master mathematical concepts that they will be able to use to enrich their high school curriculum;
  4. Be able to distinguish coherent mathematical arguments from fallacious ones and to construct precise arguments of previously seen or related results with the goal of teaching their students the importance of giving complete explanations of mathematical ideas;
  5. Be able to synthesize material from multiple perspectives and make connections with other areas of mathematics; and
  6. Be able to use mathematics teaching technology appropriate to each mathematical topic.

 

Nonprofit Administration (M.A. and certificate)

Students will

  1. Develop an understanding of contemporary ethical issues in the nonprofit sector and normative frameworks for addressing these challenges;
  2. Communicate effectively using multiple forms of expression appropriate to nonprofit settings;
  3. Have and use knowledge of functional areas of particular relevance in the nonprofit sector (e.g., human resources, financial management, resource development, evaluation, executive leadership) and management skills essential for building effective and efficient organizations;
  4. Have critical thinking and problem-solving skills and leadership and collaborative skills relevant to organizations addressing growing social needs and resource constraints.

Note: The M.A. and the certificate have the same learning goals but different assessment measures (i.e., the M.A. uses the thesis or essay).

 

Part-Time M.B.A.

Students will:

  1. Have a common body of knowledge: Know the functional areas of the business disciplines.
  2. Have communication skills: Will effectively communicate ideas and plans.
  3. Have analytical problem solving skills: Be able to define a problem based on ambiguous information and identify a set of tasks necessary to develop and effective solution.
  4. Have ethical reasoning skills: Identify the ethical and social responsibility dimensions of business problems
  5. Evaluate planning and implementation decisions: Identify and develop resources (e.g., financial, human, distribution, technology, brand) to create an effective strategy for the future of an organization

 

Peace, Justice, & Human Rights

Students will

  1. Describe, explain, analyze, and reflect upon the complex and systematic nature of peace building, justice, and human rights;
  2. Ascertain and understand those situations where the ideals of peace, justice, and human rights are not attained (including both domestic and global situations and including causes, consequences, and solutions);
  3. Articulate a world view that leads to concern for and on behalf of those who suffer from conflict, injustice and/or human rights violations;
  4. Demonstrate increased levels of engagement (both on and off campus) with issues related to peace, justice, and human rights; and
  5. Demonstrate continued levels of engagement in peace, justice, and human rights issues after graduation from JCU

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Philosophy

Students will

  1. Write and speak knowledgably about central aspects of and problems within the history of philosophy, as well as about philosophy’s major historical figures;
  2. Critically evaluate arguments and evidence;
  3. Understand the relationship between philosophy and other academic disciplines; and
  4. Develop the skills necessary to engage critically with contemporary social issues.

Note: The major and the minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Physics (B.A.)

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the core principles and concepts of physics;
  2. Apply mathematical, analytical, computational, and experimental skills to model the behavior of physical systems, solve a wide range of physics problems, design and conduct experiments to measure and interpret physical phenomena, and to critically evaluate scientific results and arguments, both of their own and that of others;
  3. Effectively communicate scientific hypothesis, research methods, data and analysis both orally and in writing and in a variety of venues;
  4. Demonstrate awareness of professional responsibilities and good citizenship as members of the scientific community; and
  5. Be prepared to enter graduate school or employment appropriate to their chosen career path.

 

Physics (B.S.)

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the core principles and concepts of physics, and gain understanding in selected additional advanced topics in physics;
  2. Apply mathematical, analytical, computational, and experimental skills to model the behavior of physical systems, solve a wide range of physics problems, design and conduct experiments to measure and interpret physical phenomena, and to critically evaluate scientific results and arguments, both of their own and that of others;
  3. Effectively communicate scientific hypothesis, research methods, data and analysis both orally and in writing and in a variety of venues;
  4. Demonstrate awareness of professional responsibilities and good citizenship as members of the scientific community; and
  5. Be prepared to enter graduate school or employment appropriate to their chosen career path.

 

Physics (minor)

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the core principles and concepts of physics at an introductory level;
  2. Apply mathematical, analytical, computational, and experimental skills to model the behavior of physical systems, solve a wide range of physics problems, design and conduct experiments to measure and interpret physical phenomena, and to critically evaluate scientific results and arguments;
  3. Effectively communicate scientific hypothesis, research methods, data and analysis both orally and in writing and in a variety of venues;

 

Population and Public Health

Students will

  1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of population and public health:
    1. Define population and public health and identify the significance of the core areas of public health to its goals;
    2. Explain how the American public health system operates at federal, state, and local levels;
    3. Discuss issues in public health policy;
    4. Discuss the impact of differences in social class, sex/gender, and culture on individual and population health; and
    5. Identify key environmental issues related to health;
  2. Demonstrate familiarity with the concepts and uses of epidemiology to understand the prevalence and distribution of disease; and
  3. Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and professional conduct.

 

Political Science

Students will

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the major fields of political science: American, comparative, IR, theory, and methods.
  2. Demonstrate academic and intellectual skills: critical analysis; academic writing; and oral communication.
  3. Be engaged in and aware of local, national and global politics.
  4. Be prepared, according to interest, for graduate programs and/or careers related to Political Science (e.g. public policy, law, political journalism, international service).

The Political Science major offers a number of concentrations, which each have their own unique learning goal (listed below).

  • Global and Foreign Area Studies: Demonstrate broad awareness of the key issues facing our world today, including how understanding current affairs relates to historical cases and theories. Students must be able to indicate how the relationships between and among states and non-state actors help shape institutions and global politics in general
  • Law and Society: Demonstrate knowledge of law and legal institutions from a variety of perspectives both within and outside the discipline of law, with a focus on the relationship between law and political and social change
  • Public Affairs: Understand the relationship between the institutional structure and processes of public policy and public administration, and the degree to which politics, both within and outside bureaucracy, impact the responsibility and responsiveness of public servants
  • Spatial Analysis: Develop skills in data analysis and presentation, with particular emphasis on the field of spatial analysis

 

Political Science (minors)

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of political science as a discipline of knowledge.
  2. Demonstrate academic and intellectual skills: critical analysis; academic writing; and oral communication.
  3. Be engaged in and aware of local, national and global politics.
  4. Be prepared, according to interest, for graduate programs and/or careers related to Political Science (e.g. public policy, law, political journalism, international service).

Note: Expectations of degrees of disciplinary knowledge and in various sub-fields and of specifics of engagement in politics differ among students who minor in Foreign Affairs, Political Science, or U.S. Affairs.

 

Pre-Health Professions Program

Students will

  1. Acquire foundational knowledge of the human and natural worlds through completion of appropriate integrative courses and other courses which ensuring academic preparation for health professional programs;
  2. Understand the variety of careers in healthcare and pathways to access those careers, including program prerequisites, standardized tests needed, and application processes and explain why the chosen career path is personally appropriate; and
  3. Demonstrate understanding that health careers are service careers, requiring skills involving critical analysis, communication, leadership, collaboration, cultural competency, and creative thinking.

 

Pre-Medical Post-Baccalaureate Program

Students will

  1. Demonstrate readiness for medical or other professional health care schools by completing course requirements for admission to such programs.

 

Professional Healthcare Preparation (minor/certificate)

Students will

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of healthcare as a healing art;
  2. Promote patient-centered understanding and respect;
  3. Integrate leadership and ethical perspectives with the practice of medicine;
  4. Communicate effectively to patients and peers; and
  5. Manage practical and business aspects of health care.

Note: The minor. and the certificate have the same learning goals but different assessment measures.

 

Psychology

At the conclusion of the program, students will demonstrate

  1. A fundamental knowledge base in the core areas of psychological science;
  2. Critical thinking skills and their application;
  3. Proficiency in the use of the language of psychological science in both written and verbal form;
  4. Expertise in the methods of information gathering, organization, and synthesis as applied to psychological science;
  5. Mastery of the experimental method and statistical analysis as practiced by psychologists;
  6. An understanding of the ethics and values of the discipline;
  7. A readiness for graduate study or for transition into the workforce; and
  8. Recognition of how psychological science contributes to the understanding of human diversity.

The Psychological Science major offers concentrations in Child and Family Studies, Forensic Psychology, I/O Psychology, and Mental Health Services. Each concentration has its own unique learning goal:

  • Students in a particular concentration will demonstrate proficiency in the use of the language and science of that sub-field in both written and verbal form.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Reserve Officer Training Corps

Cadets will

  1. Have the capability to perform as junior officers (2LT’s) in the U.S. Army, and take charge of a
  2. platoon of soldiers;
  3. Display competence in basic soldier skills and officer competencies;
  4. Set and enforce Army standards in accordance with Army regulations and command guidance.
  5. Lead soldiers in accordance with Army standards; and
  6. Establish and build professionalism based in Army values and ethic, character, and national service.

 

School Counseling (M.Ed.)

Students will

  1. Identify as a school counselor who is knowledgeable about the history and development of the school counseling profession, is aware of the challenges facing the profession and is prepared to advocate for the profession.
  2. Plan a developmentally appropriate school-counseling program that supports academic, personal/social, and career development. The program should be modeled on the ASCA standards and should take into consideration the specific needs of a particular school setting.
  3. Communicate, collaborate and consult with school age students, their families, school staff, and community agency representatives to promote a safe, healthy, and effective learning environment.
  4. Implement a system of on-going program evaluation by establishing a framework for record- keeping and continuous feedback from program stakeholders.

Note: The Counseling(graduate) learning goals also apply to students in this program.

 

Sociology & Criminology

Students who complete a major in sociology will

  1. Engage in critical questioning about their society, its social structure, and the larger world in which they live;
  2. Develop critical sociological thinking skills in reasoning, theoretical analysis, interpretation of research findings, and the general ability to separate fact from misinformation and rhetorical manipulation in order to engage the institutions and cultures of the multiple societies in this global community;
  3. Engage in research of various types with the goal of answering questions about the nature of human society and its diversity, cultures, human interactions, social structures, and issues related to social justice; and
  4. Develop as whole persons with their completion of a successful educational program with its implications for continued learning and a successful work life, and a commitment to lifelong civic engagement.

The Sociology and Criminology major offers a number of undergraduate concentrations, each of which has its own unique learning goal:

  • Aging Studies: Accurately identify and clearly apply gerontological concepts related to marginalization, the aging process, societal/family impact, wellness, impairment, and/or adaptation to the internship experience to deepen his/her understanding of issues related to aging.
  • Criminology: Accurately identify and clearly apply sociological and criminological concepts related to crime, justice, and law enforcement to deepen his/her understanding of the social issues.
  • Diversity, Culture, and Inclusion: Accurately identify and clearly apply sociological concepts of cultural diversity within and across societies to a research paper deepening his/her understanding of diversity within and/or across societies.
  • Human Service, Health, and Social Justice: Accurately identify and clearly apply concepts related to poverty, inequalities, and/or social justice to the internship experience to deepen his/her understanding of social issues.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Sociology & Criminology: Forensic Behavioral Science

Students will

  1. Understand the theoretical principles associated with forensic psychology, forensic criminology, and the criminal justice system;
  2. Understand practice-related skills associated with crime scene analysis, court testimony procedures, and internships;
  3. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the social, political, and economic issues related to forensic behavioral science; and
  4. Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of ethical issues related to the crime-forensic relationship.

 

Spanish

Students will be able to

  1. Communicate skillfully and effectively in Spanish:
    1. engage in effective interpersonal communication;
    2. engage in effective interpretive listening;
    3. engage in effective interpretive reading;
    4. engage in effective presentational speaking;
    5. engage in effective presentational writing.
  2. Demonstrate foundational cultural and linguistic knowledge of a target-language area;
    1. demonstrate knowledge of features of the culture of a target-language area, such as its art, literature, music, film, popular culture, tradition, and customs;
    2. demonstrate knowledge of how aspects of the history, politics, religion, or geography of a target-language area relate to its culture;
    3. compare linguistic features of the target language with those of English;
    4. compare the culture and society of the target-language area with one’s own.
  3. Demonstrate emerging intercultural competence.
    1. demonstrate an awareness of the interplay of personal identity and culture;
    2. interpret an event, cultural product, or issue from the perspective of a worldview outside their own.

Note: The major and minor have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via different measures, rubric dimensions or expected levels of performance.

 

Mike Cleary Program in Sports Studies

Students will demonstrate

  1. Knowledge of history, philosophy, mission, personal and professional identity;
  2. Knowledge of working with diverse populations within multiple types of sports administration, and sports-related settings and provide evidence of their ability to be an effective leader;
  3. Knowledge of Organization, Leadership and Planning for a variety of situations;
  4. Knowledge of research and the appropriate use of research in papers, projects, and for problem-solving and critical thinking;
  5. Knowledge related to the collection and interpretation of data and the effective use of data-driven decision-making in an ethical and moral manner with attention to the decision-making process and its impact on others (e.g., employees, those being served, and the broader community);
  6. Knowledge related to moral and ethical behavior for a movement professional.

The Sports Studies major offers two undergraduate concentrations, each of which has its own unique learning goal:

  • Sports & Athletics Administration: Demonstrate their knowledge in a professional internship setting in Sports Administration through planning, organization, decision-making, reflection, oversight and implementation of rules, policies and procedures.
  • Sports, Fitness, & Wellness for Diverse Populations: Demonstrate their knowledge in a professional internship setting working with diverse populations, through planning, organization, decision-making, reflection, oversight and implementation of rules, policies and procedures.

 

Statistics and Analytics (minor)

Students will

  1. Develop an in-depth integrated knowledge in applied statistics beginning with a Quantitative Analysis course and extending into MT 322 Applied Regression Analysis and MT 422 Applied Statistics;
  2. Encounter applications of statistics within a partner discipline, such as Mathematics, Psychological Science, Biology, or Economics;
  3. Communicate statistical results and present interpretations of statistical analysis both in writing and orally;
  4. Apply appropriate statistical methods to previously encountered or closely-related research problems;
  5. Apply appropriate statistical methods to research problems not previously encountered; and
  6. Apply appropriate technology in the analysis of real or realistic research problems.

 

Student Accessibility Services

Students will

  1. understand the intake process and complete the necessary paperwork to successfully register for services;
  2. Be able to articulate their needs to faculty and staff;
  3. Be able to identify campus resources that will prepare them for academic and personal success at JCU; and
  4. Be able to self-advocate for their disability needs and accommodations at JCU and after departure from JCU.

 

Supply Chain Management

Students will have

  1. Knowledge of logistics and supply chain management;
  2. Skills necessary to identify opportunities and challenges associated with logistics and supply chain management;
  3. Ability to differentiate acceptable logistics and supply chain management practices from unacceptable logistics and supply chain management practices; and
  4. Ability to apply logistics and supply chain management concepts to improve operational effectiveness and efficiency.

The academic foundation should allow graduating Supply Chain Management majors to:

  1. enter a career in a for-profit, non-profit, or entrepreneurial setting;
  2. enter a quality graduate program in a variety of fields, particularly in business;
  3. augment their business logistics foundation with career choices that enable the student to design and innovate sustainable solutions in a global marketplace; and
  4. seek further professional certification in business logistics or supply chain management (examples include CTL (Certified in Transportation and Logistics); CPIM (Certified in Production and Inventory Management); SCPro (certification program conducted through the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals)).

 

Theology and Religious Studies

The student

  1. Understands the key terms and methodologies of the diverse subfields within the academic study of religion (including biblical studies, ethics, historical approaches, and systematic theology) and is able to articulate his or her own methodological approach.
  2. Applies a variety of interpretative methods (including historical-critical methods) to the Bible and to the sacred texts of at least one other religious tradition; able to assess the strengths and weakness of these methods.
  3. Compares and contrasts the beliefs, practices, or worldview of at least two religious traditions in a way that models respectful interaction with people, ideas, and cultures that are different.
  4. Assesses and applies multiple religious or ethical frameworks to complex issues, with an awareness of the root causes of injustice and a commitment to address these issues and contribute to the common good.
  5. Understands Catholic theological approaches to multiple fundamental questions and how these questions are related to one another.

 

Theology and Religious Studies (minor)

The student

  1. Understands the basic terms in the academic study of religion and is able to apply them to specific religious traditions and to her or his own experiences and worldview.
  2. Applies historical-critical methods to interpret sacred texts from a particular religious tradition and recognizes how these methods differ from other modes of interpretation.
  3. Respectfully articulates the beliefs, practices, or worldview of a non-Christian religious tradition with an awareness of the internal diversity and the various cultural, social, and historical influences within that tradition.
  4. Applies a religious or ethical framework to the analysis of one social justice issue or ethical dilemma, marked by deepening empathy and growing awareness of his or her own relation to structures of injustice.
  5. Understands Catholic theological approaches to a fundamental human question in light of historical, cultural, and social contexts.

 

Theology and Religious Studies (graduate)

The student

  1. Exhibits a nuanced understanding of the key terms and methodologies of the diverse subfields within the academic study of religion, including knowledge of diversity and development within these subfields; is able to articulate and apply in depth a particular methodology to a specific religious question or topic.
  2. Critically analyzes religious texts, art, doctrines, practices, and other expressions in light of their historical, cultural, and social contexts; understands the methods, sources, and research tools necessary for academic research of these expressions.
  3. Demonstrates a deep awareness of multiple religious worldviews and is able to engage in the kind of inter-religious dialogue that leads to mutual respect and understanding.
  4. Assesses and applies multiple religious or ethical frameworks to complex issues, with an awareness of the various interrelated causes of injustice and a commitment to respond evidenced in action for the common good.
  5. Exhibits a nuanced understanding of the key terms and methodologies within Catholic systematic theology, and the ability to address strengths and weaknesses of differing theological approaches.
  6. Demonstrates aptitude and facility with standard practices of advanced academic research in theology and religious studies and a potential for original work in the field.

Contact Us

Todd Bruce, Ph.D.
Assistant Provost for Institutional Effectiveness and Advising
AD 133D
216.397.1600

Carey Ann Lopuchovsky
AD 140
216.397.6618