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Initial Licensure Overview

John Carroll University offers initial teacher licensure programs in three distinct ways: undergraduate programs, school-based M.Ed. programs, and initial licensure M.Ed. programs.

Learning Goals by Type of Program

Type of Program State Education Area JCU Grad
Undergraduate Ohio Education (Initital) Area (see below) JCU Core
School-Based M.Ed. Ohio Education (Initital) Area (see below) JCU Grad
Initial Licensure M.Ed. Ohio Education (Initital) Area (see below) JCU Grad
         

The school-based M.Ed. and initial licensure M.Ed. do not differ in learning goals but rather in coursework and mode of delivery.

Learning Goals by Licensure Area

The learning goals for each licensure area are embedded in the standards provided by Specialized Professional Associations as part of CAEP accreditation.

Education: Early Childhood – NAEYC and Reading

Education: Middle Childhood – AMLE and Reading

Education: Adolescent/Young Adult

Endorsements

Early Childhood Generalist Endorsement

Reading (Pre-K to 12) Endorsement (see also below)

Teacher Leader Endorsement (see also below)

Graduate Degrees and Certificates Overview

Advanced Studies in Education (M.A./M.Ed.)

Note: The M.A. and the M.Ed. have the same learning goals but different assessment measures (i.e., the M.A. uses the thesis or essay). The various concentrations represent only possible ways to complete the program, but students are allowed to design their own course of study within certain parameters. For this reason, the same learning goals apply to the following concentrations: Adolescent/Young Adult Education, Assessment and Accountability, Child and Adolescent Health and Wellness, Curriculum Specialist, Early Childhood, Middle Childhood Education, Reading Teacher, Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorder and Effective Interventions. These concentrations have the same learning goals but are differentiated in assessment via emphasis within goals, different measures, rubric dimensions and/or expected levels of performance.

Assessment, Research, and Measurement (Certificate of Advanced Studies)

Educational Psychology (M.A./M.Ed.)

Note: The M.A. and the M.Ed. have the same learning goals but different assessment measures (i.e., the M.A. uses the thesis or essay).

School Psychology (M.Ed.)

School Psychology (Ed.S.)

Adolescent/Young Adult Education: Integrated Language Arts (NCTE)

Content Knowledge

  1. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English language arts subject matter content that specifically includes literature and multimedia texts as well as knowledge of the nature of adolescents as readers.
    1. Element 1: Candidates are knowledgeable about texts—print and non-print texts, media texts, classic texts and contemporary texts, including young adult—that represent a range of world literatures, historical traditions, genres, and the experiences of different genders, ethnicities, and social classes; they are able to use literary theories to interpret and critique a range of texts.
    2. Element 2: Candidates are knowledgeable about how adolescents read texts and make meaning through interaction with media environments.
  2. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of English language arts subject matter content that specifically includes language and writing as well as knowledge of adolescents as language users.
    1. Element 1: Candidates can compose a range of formal and informal texts taking into consideration the interrelationships among form, audience, context, and purpose; candidates understand that writing is a recursive process; candidates can use contemporary technologies and/or digital media to compose multimodal discourse.
    2. Element 2: Candidates know the conventions of English language as they relate to various rhetorical situations (grammar, usage, and mechanics); they understand the concept of dialect and are familiar with relevant grammar systems (e.g., descriptive and prescriptive); they understand principles of language acquisition; they recognize the influence of English language history on ELA content; and they understand the impact of language on society.
    3. Element 3: Candidates are knowledgeable about how adolescents compose texts and make meaning through interaction with media environments.

Content Pedagogy: Planning Literature and Reading Instruction in ELA

  1. Candidates plan instruction and design assessments for reading and the study of literature to promote learning for all students.
    1. Element 1: Candidates use their knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant learning experiences utilizing a range of different texts—across genres, periods, forms, authors, cultures, and various forms of media—and instructional strategies that are motivating and accessible to all students, including English language learners, students with special needs, students from diverse language and learning backgrounds, those designated as high achieving, and those at risk of failure.
    2. Element 2: Candidates design a range of authentic assessments (e.g., formal and informal, formative and summative) of reading and literature that demonstrate an understanding of how learners develop and that address interpretive, critical, and evaluative abilities in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and presenting.
    3. Element 3: Candidates plan standards-based, coherent and relevant learning experiences in reading that reflect knowledge of current theory and research about the teaching and learning of reading and that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and a variety of reading strategies.
    4. Element 4: Candidates design or knowledgeably select appropriate reading assessments that inform instruction by providing data about student interests, reading proficiencies, and reading processes.
    5. Element 5: Candidates plan instruction that incorporates knowledge of language—structure, history, and conventions—to facilitate students’ comprehension and interpretation of print and non-print texts.
    6. Element 6: Candidates plan instruction which, when appropriate, reflects curriculum integration and incorporates interdisciplinary teaching methods and materials.

Content Pedagogy: Planning Composition Instruction in ELA

  1. Candidates plan instruction and design assessments for composing texts (i.e., oral, written, and visual) to promote learning for all students.
    1. Element 1: Candidates use their knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant composing experiences that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and contemporary technologies and reflect an understanding of writing processes and strategies in different genres for a variety of purposes and audiences.
    2. Element 2: Candidates design a range of assessments for students that promote their development as writers, are appropriate to the writing task, and are consistent with current research and theory. Candidates are able to respond to student writing in process and to finished texts in ways that engage students’ ideas and encourage their growth as writers over time.
    3. Element 3: Candidates design instruction related to the strategic use of language conventions (grammar, usage, and mechanics) in the context of students’ writing for different audiences, purposes, and modalities.
    4. Element 4: Candidates design instruction that incorporates students’ home and community languages to enable skillful control over their rhetorical choices and language practices for a variety of audiences and purposes.

Learners and Learning: Implementing English Language Arts Instruction

  1. Candidates plan, implement, assess, and reflect on research-based instruction that increases motivation and active student engagement, builds sustained learning of English language arts, and responds to diverse students’ context-based needs.
    1. Element 1: Candidates plan and implement instruction based on ELA curricular requirements and standards, school and community contexts, and knowledge about students’ linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
    2. Element 2: Candidates use data about their students’ individual differences, identities, and funds of knowledge for literacy learning to create inclusive learning environments that contextualize curriculum and instruction and help students participate actively in their own learning in ELA.
    3. Element 3: Candidates differentiate instruction based on students’ self-assessments and formal and informal assessments of learning in English language arts; candidates communicate with students about their performance in ways that actively involve them in their own learning.
    4. Element 4: Candidates select, create, and use a variety of instructional strategies and teaching resources, including contemporary technologies and digital media, consistent with what is currently known about student learning in English Language Arts.

Professional Knowledge and Skills

  1. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of how theories and research about social justice, diversity, equity, student identities, and schools as institutions can enhance students’ opportunities to learn in English Language Arts.
    1. Element 1: Candidates plan and implement English language arts and literacy instruction that promotes social justice and critical engagement with complex issues related to maintaining a diverse, inclusive, equitable society.
    2. Element 2: Candidates use knowledge of theories and research to plan instruction responsive to students’ local, national and international histories, individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender expression, age, appearance, ability, spiritual belief, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and community environment), and languages/dialects as they affect students’ opportunities to learn in ELA.
  2. Candidates are prepared to interact knowledgeably with students, families, and colleagues based on social needs and institutional roles, engage in leadership and/or collaborative roles in English Language Arts professional learning communities, and actively develop as professional educators.
    1. Element 1: Candidates model literate and ethical practices in ELA teaching, and engage in/reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA.
    2. Element 2: Candidates engage in and reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA that demonstrate understanding of and readiness for leadership, collaboration, ongoing professional development, and community engagement.

Adolescent/Young Adult Education: Integrated Mathematics (NCTM)

Content Knowledge: Effective teachers of secondary mathematics demonstrate and apply knowledge of major mathematics concepts, algorithms, procedures, connections, and applications within and among mathematical content domains.

    1. Demonstrate and apply knowledge of major mathematics concepts, algorithms, procedures, applications in varied contexts, and connections within and among mathematical domains (Number, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Statistics, Probability, Calculus, and Discrete Mathematics) as outlined in the NCTM CAEP Mathematics Content for Secondary.
  1. Mathematical Practices: Effective teachers of secondary mathematics solve problems, represent mathematical ideas, reason, prove, use mathematical models, attend to precision, identify elements of structure, generalize, engage in mathematical communication, and make connections as essential mathematical practices. They understand that these practices intersect with mathematical content and that understanding relies on the ability to demonstrate these practices within and among mathematical domains and in their teaching.
    1. Use problem solving to develop conceptual understanding, make sense of a wide variety of problems and persevere in solving them, apply and adapt a variety of strategies in solving problems confronted within the field of mathematics and other contexts, and formulate and test conjectures in order to frame generalizations.
    2. Reason abstractly, reflectively, and quantitatively with attention to units, constructing viable arguments and proofs, and critiquing the reasoning of others; represent and model generalizations using mathematics; recognize structure and express regularity in patterns of mathematical reasoning; use multiple representations to model and describe mathematics; and utilize appropriate mathematical vocabulary and symbols to communicate mathematical ideas to others.
    3. Formulate, represent, analyze, and interpret mathematical models derived from real-world contexts or mathematical problems.
    4. Organize mathematical thinking and use the language of mathematics to express ideas precisely, both orally and in writing to multiple audiences.
    5. Demonstrate the interconnectedness of mathematical ideas and how they build on one another and recognize and apply mathematical connections among mathematical ideas and across various content areas and real-world contexts.
    6. Model how the development of mathematical understanding within and among mathematical domains intersects with the mathematical practices of problem solving, reasoning, communicating, connecting, and representing.
  2. Content Pedagogy: Effective teachers of secondary mathematics apply knowledge of curriculum standards for mathematics and their relationship to student learning within and across mathematical domains. They incorporate research-based mathematical experiences and include multiple instructional strategies and mathematics-specific technological tools in their teaching to develop all students’ mathematical understanding and proficiency. They provide students with opportunities to do mathematics – talking about it and connecting it to both theoretical and real-world contexts. They plan, select, implement, interpret, and use formative and summative assessments for monitoring student learning, measuring student mathematical understanding, and informing practice.
    1. Apply knowledge of curriculum standards for secondary mathematics and their relationship to student learning within and across mathematical domains.
    2. Analyze and consider research in planning for and leading students in rich mathematical learning experiences.
    3. Plan lessons and units that incorporate a variety of strategies, differentiated instruction for diverse populations, and mathematics-specific and instructional technologies in building all students’ conceptual understanding and procedural proficiency.
    4. Provide students with opportunities to communicate about mathematics and make connections among mathematics, other content areas, everyday life, and the workplace.
    5. Implement techniques related to student engagement and communication including selecting high quality tasks, guiding mathematical discussions, identifying key mathematical ideas, identifying and addressing student misconceptions, and employing a range of questioning strategies.
    6. Plan, select, implement, interpret, and use formative and summative assessments to inform instruction by reflecting on mathematical proficiencies essential for all students.
    7. Monitor students’ progress, make instructional decisions, and measure students’ mathematical understanding and ability using formative and summative assessments.
  3. Mathematical Learning Environment: Effective teachers of secondary mathematics exhibit knowledge of adolescent learning, development, and behavior. They use this knowledge to plan and create sequential learning opportunities grounded in mathematics education research where students are actively engaged in the mathematics they are learning and building from prior knowledge and skills. They demonstrate a positive disposition toward mathematical practices and learning, include culturally relevant perspectives in teaching, and demonstrate equitable and ethical treatment of and high expectations for all students. They use instructional tools such as manipulatives, digital tools, and virtual resources to enhance learning while recognizing the possible limitations of such tools.
    1. Exhibit knowledge of adolescent learning, development, and behavior and demonstrate a positive disposition toward mathematical processes and learning.
    2. Plan and create developmentally appropriate, sequential, and challenging learning opportunities grounded in mathematics education research in which students are actively engaged in building new knowledge from prior knowledge and experiences.
    3. Incorporate knowledge of individual differences and the cultural and language diversity that exists within classrooms and include culturally relevant perspectives as a means to motivate and engage students.
    4. Demonstrate equitable and ethical treatment of and high expectations for all students.
    5. Apply mathematical content and pedagogical knowledge to select and use instructional tools such as manipulatives and physical models, drawings, virtual environments, spreadsheets, presentation tools, and mathematics-specific technologies (e.g., graphing tools, interactive geometry software, computer algebra systems, and statistical packages); and make sound decisions about when such tools enhance teaching and learning, recognizing both the insights to be gained and possible limitations of such tools.
  4. Impact on Student Learning: Effective teachers of secondary mathematics provide evidence demonstrating that as a result of their instruction, secondary students’ conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, and application of major mathematics concepts in varied contexts have increased. These teachers support the continual development of a productive disposition toward mathematics. They show that new student mathematical knowledge has been created as a consequence of their ability to engage students in mathematical experiences that are developmentally appropriate, require active engagement, and include mathematics-specific technology in building new knowledge.
    1. Verify that secondary students demonstrate conceptual understanding; procedural fluency; the ability to formulate, represent, and solve problems; logical reasoning and continuous reflection on that reasoning; productive disposition toward mathematics; and the application of mathematics in a variety of contexts within major mathematical domains.
    2. Engage students in developmentally appropriate mathematical activities and investigations that require active engagement and include mathematics-specific technology in building new knowledge.
    3. Collect, organize, analyze, and reflect on diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment evidence and determine the extent to which students’ mathematical proficiencies have increased as a result of their instruction.
  5. Professional Knowledge and Skills: Effective teachers of secondary mathematics are lifelong learners and recognize that learning is often collaborative. They participate in professional development experiences specific to mathematics and mathematics education, draw upon mathematics education research to inform practice, continuously reflect on their practice, and utilize resources from professional mathematics organizations.
    1. Take an active role in their professional growth by participating in professional development experiences that directly relate to the learning and teaching of mathematics.
    2. Engage in continuous and collaborative learning that draws upon research in mathematics education to inform practice; enhance learning opportunities for all students’ mathematical knowledge development; involve colleagues, other school professionals, families, and various stakeholders; and advance their development as a reflective practitioner.
    3. Utilize resources from professional mathematics education organizations such as print, digital, and virtual resources/collections.
  6. Secondary Mathematics Field Experiences and Clinical Practice: Effective teachers of secondary mathematics engage in a planned sequence of field experiences and clinical practice under the supervision of experienced and highly qualified mathematics teachers. They develop a broad experiential base of knowledge, skills, effective approaches to mathematics teaching and learning, and professional behaviors across both middle and high school settings that involve a diverse range and varied groupings of students. Candidates experience a full-time student teaching/internship in secondary mathematics directed by university or college faculty with secondary mathematics teaching experience or equivalent knowledge base.
    1. Engage in a sequence of planned field experiences and clinical practice prior to a full-time student teaching/internship experience that include observing and participating in both middle and high school mathematics classrooms and working with a diverse range of students individually, in small groups, and in large class settings under the supervision of experienced and highly qualified mathematics teachers in varied settings that reflect cultural, ethnic, linguistic, gender, and learning differences.
    2. Experience full-time student teaching/internship in secondary mathematics that is supervised by a highly qualified mathematics teacher and a university or college supervisor with secondary mathematics teaching experience or equivalent knowledge base.
    3. Develop knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors across both middle and high school settings; examine the nature of mathematics, how mathematics should be taught, and how students learn mathematics; and observe and analyze a range of approaches to mathematics teaching and learning, focusing on tasks, discourse, environment, and assessment.

Adolescent/Young Adult Education: Integrated Social Studies (NCSS)

Thematic Standards

Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of

  • Culture and Cultural Diversity
  • Time, Continuity, and Change
  • People, Places, and Environments
  • Individual Development and Identity
  • Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
  • Power, Authority, and Governance
  • Production, Distribution, and Consumption
  • Science, Technology, and Society
  • Global Connections
  • Civic Ideals and Practices

Pedagogical Standards

  1. Learning and Development: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to provide learning opportunities at the appropriate school levels that support learners’ intellectual, social, and personal development.
  2. Differences in Learning Styles: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to create at the appropriate school levels learning experiences that fit the different approaches to learning of diverse learners.
  3. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Performance Skills: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to use at the appropriate school levels a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.
  4. Active Learning and Motivation: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to create at the appropriate school levels learning environments that encourage social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  5. Inquiry, Collaboration, and Supportive Classroom Interaction: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to use at the appropriate school levels verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques that foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
  6. Planning Instruction: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to plan instruction for the appropriate school levels based on understanding of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.
  7. Assessment: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to use formal and informal assessment strategies at the appropriate school levels to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of learners. They should be able to assess student learning using various assessment formats, including performance assessment, fixed response, open-ended questioning, and portfolio strategies.
  8. Reflection and Professional Growth: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to develop as reflective practitioners and continuous learners.
  9. Professional Leadership: Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to foster cross-subject-matter collaboration and other positive relationships with school colleagues, and positive associations with parents and others in the larger community to support student learning and well-being.

 

Adolescent/Young Adult Education: Science (NSTA)

  1. Content Knowledge: Effective teachers of science understand and articulate the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. They interrelate and interpret important concepts, ideas, and applications in their fields of licensure.
    1. Understand the major concepts, principles, theories, laws, and interrelationships of their fields of licensure and supporting fields as recommended by the National Science Teachers Association.
    2. Understand the central concepts of the supporting disciplines and the supporting role of science-specific technology.
    3. Show an understanding of state and national curriculum standards and their impact on the content knowledge necessary for teaching P-12 students.
  2. Content Pedagogy: Effective teachers of science understand how students learn and develop scientific knowledge. Preservice teachers use scientific inquiry to develop this knowledge for all students.
    1. Plan multiple lessons using a variety of inquiry approaches that demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of how all students learn science.
    2. Include active inquiry lessons where students collect and interpret data in order to develop and communicate concepts and understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. Applications of science-specific technology are included in the lessons when appropriate.
    3. Design instruction and assessment strategies that confront and address naïve concepts/preconceptions.
  3. Learning Environments: Effective teachers of science are able to plan for engaging all students in science learning by setting appropriate goals that are consistent with knowledge of how students learn science and are aligned with state and national standards. The plans reflect the nature and social context of science, inquiry, and appropriate safety considerations. Candidates design and select learning activities, instructional settings, and resources–including science-specific technology, to achieve those goals; and they plan fair and equitable assessment strategies to evaluate if the learning goals are met.
    1. Use a variety of strategies that demonstrate the candidates’ knowledge and understanding of how to select the appropriate teaching and learning activities – including laboratory or field settings and applicable instruments and/or technology- to allow access so that all students learn. These strategies are inclusive and motivating for all students.
    2. Develop lesson plans that include active inquiry lessons where students collect and interpret data using applicable science-specific technology in order to develop concepts, understand scientific processes, relationships and natural patterns from empirical experiences. These plans provide for equitable achievement of science literacy for all students.
    3. Plan fair and equitable assessment strategies to analyze student learning and to evaluate if the learning goals are met. Assessment strategies are designed to continuously evaluate preconceptions and ideas that students hold and the understandings that students have formulated.
    4. Plan a learning environment and learning experiences for all students that demonstrate chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms within their licensure area.
  4. Safety: Effective teachers of science can, in a P-12 classroom setting, demonstrate and maintain chemical safety, safety procedures, and the ethical treatment of living organisms needed in the P-12 science classroom appropriate to their area of licensure.
    1. Design activities in a P-12 classroom that demonstrate the safe and proper techniques for the preparation, storage, dispensing, supervision, and disposal of all materials used within their subject area science instruction.
    2. Design and demonstrate activities in a P-12 classroom that demonstrate an ability to implement emergency procedures and the maintenance of safety equipment, policies and procedures that comply with established state and/or national guidelines. Candidates ensure safe science activities appropriate for the abilities of all students.
    3. Design and demonstrate activities in a P-12 classroom that demonstrate ethical decision-making with respect to the treatment of all living organisms in and out of the classroom. They emphasize safe, humane, and ethical treatment of animals and comply with the legal restrictions on the collection, keeping, and use of living organisms.
  5. Impact on Student Learning: Effective teachers of science provide evidence to show that P-12 students’ understanding of major science concepts, principles, theories, and laws have changed as a result of instruction by the candidate and that student knowledge is at a level of understanding beyond memorization. Candidates provide evidence for the diversity of students they teach.
    1. Collect, organize, analyze, and reflect on diagnostic, formative and summative evidence of a change in mental functioning demonstrating that scientific knowledge is gained and/or corrected.
    2. Provide data to show that P-12 students are able to distinguish science from nonscience, understand the evolution and practice of science as a human endeavor, and critically analyze assertions made in the name of science.
    3. Engage students in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in a scientific manner.
  6. Professional Knowledge and Skills: Effective teachers of science strive continuously to improve their knowledge and understanding of the ever changing knowledge base of both content, and science pedagogy, including approaches for addressing inequities and inclusion for all students in science. They identify with and conduct themselves as part of the science education community.
    1. Engage in professional development opportunities in their content field such as talks, symposiums, research opportunities, or projects within their community.
    2. Engage in professional development opportunities such as conferences, research opportunities, or projects within their community.

Adolescent/Young Adult Education: Science Content—Biology

All candidates must demonstrate competency in the following biological topics:

  • Life processes in living systems including organization of matter and energy.
  • Similarities and differences among animals, plants, fungi, microorganisms, and viruses
  • Ecological systems including the interrelationships and dependencies of organisms with each other and their environments.
  • Population dynamics and the impact of population on its environment.
  • General concepts of genetics and heredity
  • Organizations and functions of cells and multi-cellular systems.
  • Behavior of organisms and their relationships to social systems.
  • Regulation of biological systems including homeostatic mechanisms
  • Fundamental processes of modeling and investigating in the biological sciences
  • Applications of biology in environmental quality and in personal and community health
  • Bioenergetics including major biochemical pathways
  • Molecular genetics and heredity and mechanisms of genetic modification
  • Molecular basis for evolutionary theory and classification
  • Biochemical interactions of organisms and their environments
  • Causes, characteristics, and avoidance of viral, bacterial, and parasitic diseases
  • Molecular genetics
  • Issues related to living systems such as genetic modification, uses of biotechnology, cloning, and pollution from farming.
  • Historical development and perspectives in biology including contributions of significant figures and underrepresented groups, and the evolution of theories in biology
  • How to design, conduct, and report research in biology

All candidates must demonstrate competency in the following scientific topics:

  • Chemistry (biochemistry; basic chemistry laboratory techniques)
  • Physics (light, sound, optics, electricity, energy and order, magnetism)
  • Earth and space sciences (energy and geochemical cycles, climate, oceans, weather, natural resources, changes in the Earth)
  • Mathematics (probability, statistics)

Adolescent/Young Adult Education: Science Content—Chemistry

All candidates must demonstrate competency in the following chemical topics:

  • Fundamental structures of atoms and molecules
  • Basic principles of ionic, covalent, and metallic bonding
  • Periodicity of physical and chemical properties of elements
  • Laws of conservation of matter and energy
  • Fundamental of chemical kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics
  • Kinetic molecular theory and gas laws
  • Mole concept, stoichiometry, and laws of composition
  • Solutions, colloids, and colligative properties
  • Acids/base chemistry
  • Fundamental oxidation-reduction chemistry
  • Fundamental organic chemistry and biochemistry
  • Nature of science: Fundamental processes in chemistry
  • Applications of chemistry in personal and community health and environmental quality
  • Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry
  • Historical development and perspectives in chemistry
  • Principles of electrochemistry
  • Transition elements and coordination compounds
  • Molecular orbital theory, aromaticity, metallic and ionic structures, and correlation to properties of matter
  • Advanced concepts in chemical kinetics, equilibrium, gas laws, and thermodynamics
  • Lewis structures and molecular geometry
  • Advanced concepts in acid/base chemistry, including buffers
  • Major biological compounds and reactions
  • Solvent system concepts
  • Chemical reactivity and molecular structure including electronic and steric effects
  • Organic chemistry including syntheses, reactions, mechanisms, and aromaticity
  • Green chemistry and sustainability
  • How to design, conduct, and report research in chemistry

All candidates must demonstrate competency in the following scientific topics:

  • Biology (molecular biology, ecology)
  • Earth science (geochemistry, cycles of matter, energetics of Earth systems)
  • Physics (energy; properties and function of waves, motions, and forces; electricity; magnetism)
  • Mathematics (statistics, calculus, use of differential equations)

Adolescent/Young Adult Education: Science Content—Physics

All candidates must demonstrate competency in the following physical topics:

  • Energy, work, and power
  • Motion, major forces, and momentum
  • Newtonian physics w/engineering applications
  • Conservation mass, momentum, energy, and charge
  • Physical properties of matter: solids, liquids, and gases
  • Kinetic-molecular motion and atomic models
  • Radioactivity, nuclear reactors, fission, and fusion
  • Wave theory, sound, light, the electromagnetic spectrum and optics
  • Electricity and magnetism
  • Fundamental processes of investigating in physics
  • Applications of physics in environmental quality and to personal and community health
  • Thermodynamics and energy-matter relationships
  • Nuclear physics including matter-energy duality and reactivity
  • Angular rotation and momentum, centripetal forces, and vector analysis
  • Quantum mechanics, space-time relationships, and special relativity
  • Models of nuclear and subatomic structures and behavior
  • Light behavior, including wave-particle duality and models
  • Electrical phenomena including electric fields, vector analysis, energy, potential, capacitance, and inductance
  • Issues related to physics such as disposal of nuclear waste, light pollution, shielding communication systems and weapons development
  • Historical development and cosmological perspectives in physics including contributions of significant figures and underrepresented groups, and evolution of theories in physics
  • How to design, conduct, and report research in physics
  • Applications of physics and engineering in society, business, industry, and health fields.

All candidates must demonstrate competency in the following scientific topics:

  • Biology (organization of life, bioenergetics, biomechanics, cycles of matter)
  • Chemistry (organization of matter and energy, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, bonding)
  • Earth sciences and/or astronomy (structure of the universe, energy, interactions of matter)
  • Mathematics (statistics, calculus, use of differential equations)

Early Childhood Education (NAEYC)

  1. Promoting Child Development and Learning: Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs are grounded in a child development knowledge base. They use their understanding of young children’s characteristics and needs, and of multiple interacting influences on children’s development and learning, to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.
    1. Knowing and understanding young children’s characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
    2. Knowing and understanding the multiple influences on early development and learning
    3. Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children
  2. Building Family and Community Relationships: Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs understand that successful early childhood education depends upon partnerships with children’s families and communities. They know about, understand, and value the importance and complex characteristics of children’s families and communities. They use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to involve all families in their children’s development and learning.
    1. Knowing about and understanding diverse family and community characteristics
    2. Supporting and engaging families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships
    3. Involving families and communities in young children’s development and learning
  3. Observing, Documenting, and Assessing to Support Young Children and Families
    1. Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs understand that child observation, documentation, and other forms of assessment are central to the practice of all early childhood professionals. They know about and understand the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment. They know about and use systematic observations, documentation, and other effective assessment strategies in a responsible way, in partnership with families and other professionals, to positively influence the development of every child.
    2. Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment – including its use in development of appropriate goals, curriculum, and teaching strategies for young children
    3. Knowing about and using observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches, including the use of technology in documentation, assessment and data collection.
    4. Understanding and practicing responsible assessment to promote positive outcomes for each child, including the use of assistive technology for children with disabilities.
    5. Knowing about assessment partnerships with families and with professional colleagues to build effective learning environments.
  4. Using Developmentally Effective Approaches: Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs understand that teaching and learning with young children is a complex enterprise, and its details vary depending on children’s ages, characteristics, and the settings within which teaching and learning occur. They understand and use positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation for their work with young children and families. Candidates know, understand, and use a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child’s development and learning.
    1. Understanding positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation of their work with young children
    2. Knowing and understanding effective strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology
    3. Using a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching /learning approaches
    4. Reflecting on own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child
  5. Using Content Knowledge to Build Meaningful Curriculum: Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs use their knowledge of academic disciplines to design, implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning for each and every young child. Candidates understand the importance of developmental domains and academic (or content) disciplines in early childhood curriculum. They know the essential concepts, inquiry tools, and structure of content areas, including academic subjects, and can identify resources to deepen their understanding. Candidates use their own knowledge and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curriculum that promotes comprehensive developmental and learning outcomes for every young child.
    1. Understanding content knowledge and resources in academic disciplines: language and literacy; the arts – music, creative movement, dance, drama, visual arts; mathematics; science, physical activity, physical education, health and safety; and social studies.
    2. Knowing and using the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines
    3. Using own knowledge, appropriate early learning standards, and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally meaningful and challenging curriculum for each child.
  6. Becoming a Professional: Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs identify and conduct themselves as members of the early childhood profession. They know and use ethical guidelines and other professional standards related to early childhood practice. They are continuous, collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives on their work, making informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources. They are informed advocates for sound educational practices and policies.
    1. Identifying and involving oneself with the early childhood field
    2. Knowing about and upholding ethical standards and other early childhood professional guidelines
    3. Engaging in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
    4. Integrating knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education
    5. Engaging in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession

Early Childhood Education Generalist Endorsement

In addition to the Early Childhood Education learning goals, the candidate demonstrates competency in pedagogy, development, and subject matter content knowledge appropriate for grades four and five

Education (Initial Teacher Licensure)

Contexts: The candidate

  1. Understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, competing perspectives, and the structure of the disciplines taught;
  2. Recognizes the value of understanding the interests and cultural heritage of each student;
  3. Plans instruction based on knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals;
  4. Creates a learning environment of respect and rapport.

Learner Development: The candidate

  1. Understands how children/youth develop and learn;
  2. Provides learning opportunities that acknowledge and support the cognitive and social development of learners;
  3. Understands how learners differ in their approaches to learning;
  4. Demonstrates flexibility, responsiveness, and persistence in adapting to diverse learners.

Practice: The candidate

  1. Understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies; designs coherent instruction;
  2. Creates a learning environment that encourages social interaction, active engagement, and self-motivation;
  3. Uses knowledge of communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction;
  4. Understands and uses formative and summative assessment approaches and strategies.

Person: The candidate

  1. Reflects upon professional practices;
  2. Fosters relationships with colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community;
  3. Grows and develops professionally.

 

Education (Advanced Studies)

Contexts: The candidate

  1. Understands the contexts of professional practices.
  2. Demonstrates accuracy, organization, and persistence in achieving intellectual and professional goals.
  3. Contributes to the school, district, and the broader professional community.
  4. Engages in systematic inquiry.

Learner Development: The candidate

  1. Assumes responsibility in data-based decision-making and helps to ensure that decisions are based on the highest professional standards.
  2. Demonstrates knowledge of clients/students.

Practice: The candidate

  1. Demonstrates knowledge of content and pedagogy.
  2. Demonstrates knowledge of resources.
  3. Designs coherent, evidence-based interventions.
  4. Establishes favorable conditions for instruction and intervention.
  5. Uses knowledge of communication techniques to foster collaboration and supportive interactions.

Person: The candidate

  1. Takes initiative in assuming leadership roles.
  2. Initiates activities that contribute to the profession.
  3. Seeks out opportunities for professional development and growth.
  4. Actively participates in professional events and projects.
  5. Challenges negative attitudes and practices; is proactive in serving clients/students/colleagues.
  6. Assists and supports fellow professionals.

 

Middle Childhood Education (AMLE)

The Learner and Learning

  1. Young Adolescent Development: Middle level teacher candidates understand, use, and reflect on the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development and use that knowledge in their practice. They demonstrate their ability to apply this knowledge when making curricular decisions, planning and implementing instruction, participating in middle level programs and practices, and providing healthy and effective learning environments for all young adolescents.
    1. Knowledge of Young Adolescent Development: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of young adolescent development. They use this understanding of the intellectual, physical, social, emotional, and moral characteristics, needs, and interests of young adolescents to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for all young adolescents, including those whose language and cultures are different from their own.
    2. Knowledge of the Implications of Diversity on Young Adolescent Development: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate their understanding of the implications of diversity on the development of young adolescents. They implement curriculum and instruction that is responsive to young adolescents’ local, national, and international histories, language/dialects, and individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition). They participate successfully in middle level practices that consider and celebrate the diversity of all young adolescents.
    3. Implications of Young Adolescent Development for Middle Level Curriculum and Instruction: Middle level teacher candidates use their knowledge of young adolescent development when planning and implementing middle level curriculum and when selecting and using instructional strategies.
    4. Implications of Young Adolescent Development for Middle Level Programs and Practices: Middle level teacher candidates apply their knowledge of young adolescent development when making decisions about their respective roles in creating and maintaining developmentally responsive learning environments. They demonstrate their ability to participate successfully in effective middle level school organizational practices such as interdisciplinary team organization and advisory programs.

Content

  1. Middle Level Curriculum: Middle level teacher candidates understand and use the central concepts, standards, research, and structures of content to plan and implement curriculum that develops all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter. They use their knowledge and available resources to design, implement, and evaluate challenging, developmentally responsive curriculum that results in meaningful learning outcomes. Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate their ability to assist all young adolescents in understanding the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge. They design and teach curriculum that is responsive to all young adolescents’ local, national, and international histories, language/dialects, and individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition).
    1. Subject Matter Content Knowledge: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate a depth and breadth of subject matter content knowledge in the subjects they teach (e.g., English/language arts, mathematics, reading, social studies, health, physical education, and family and consumer science). They incorporate information literacy skills and state-of-the-art technologies into teaching their subjects.
    2. Middle Level Student Standards: Middle level teacher candidates use their knowledge of local, state, national, and common core standards to frame their teaching. They draw on their knowledge of these standards to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally responsive, meaningful, and challenging curriculum for all young adolescents.
    3. Interdisciplinary Nature of Knowledge: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge by helping all young adolescents make connections among subject areas. They facilitate relationships among content, ideas, interests, and experiences by developing and implementing relevant, challenging, integrative, and exploratory curriculum. They provide learning opportunities that enhance information literacy (e.g., critical thinking, problem solving, evaluation of information gained) in their specialty fields (e.g., mathematics, social studies, health).
  2. Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization: Middle level teacher candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within middle level organizational components.
    1. Middle Level Philosophical Foundations: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools.
    2. Middle Level Organization and Best Practices: Middle level teacher candidates utilize their knowledge of the effective components of middle level programs and schools to foster equitable educational practices and to enhance learning for all students (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition). They demonstrate their ability to apply this knowledge and to function successfully within a variety of school organizational settings (e.g., grades K-8, 6-8, 7-12). Middle level teacher candidates perform successfully in middle level programs and practices such as interdisciplinary teaming, advisory programs, flexible block schedules, and common teacher planning time.

Instructional Practice

  1. Middle Level Instruction and Assessment: Middle level teacher candidates understand, use, and reflect on the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to data-informed instruction and assessment. They employ a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies, information literacy skills, and technologies to meet the learning needs of all young adolescents (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition).
    1. Content Pedagogy: Middle level teacher candidates use their knowledge of instruction and assessment strategies that are especially effective in the subjects they teach.
    2. Middle Level Instructional Strategies: Middle level teacher candidates employ a wide variety of effective teaching, learning, and assessment strategies. They use instructional strategies and technologies in ways that encourage exploration, creativity, and information literacy skills (e.g., critical thinking, problem solving, evaluation of information gained) so that young adolescents are actively engaged in their learning. They use instruction that is responsive to young adolescents’ local, national, and international histories, language/dialects, and individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition).
    3. Middle Level Assessment and Data-informed Instruction: Middle level teacher candidates develop and administer assessments and use them as formative and summative tools to create meaningful learning experiences by assessing prior learning, implementing effective lessons, reflecting on young adolescent learning, and adjusting instruction based on the knowledge gained.
    4. Young Adolescent Motivation: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate their ability to motivate all young adolescents and facilitate their learning through a wide variety of developmentally responsive materials and resources (e.g., technology, manipulative materials, information literacy skills, contemporary media). They establish equitable, caring, and productive learning environments for all young adolescents.

Professional Responsibilities

  1. Middle Level Professional Roles: Middle level teacher candidates understand their complex roles as teachers of young adolescents. They engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as middle level professionals. They are informed advocates for young adolescents and middle level education, and work successfully with colleagues, families, community agencies, and community members. Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate positive dispositions and engage in ethical professional behaviors.
    1. Professional Roles of Middle Level Teachers: Middle level teacher candidates understand, reflect on, and are successful in their unique roles as middle level professionals (e.g., members of teaching teams and advisors to young adolescents).
    2. Advocacy for Young Adolescents and Developmentally Responsive Schooling Practices: Middle level teacher candidates serve as advocates for all young adolescents and for developmentally responsive schooling practices. They are informed advocates for effective middle level educational practices and policies, and use their professional leadership responsibilities to create equitable opportunities for all young adolescents in order to maximize their students’ learning.
    3. Working with Family Members and Community Involvement: Middle level teacher candidates understand and value the ways diverse family structures and cultural backgrounds influence and enrich learning. They communicate and collaborate with all family members and community partners, and participate in school and community activities. They engage in practices that build positive, collaborative relationships with families from diverse cultures and backgrounds (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition).
    4. Dispositions and Professional Behaviors: Middle level teacher candidates demonstrate positive orientations toward teaching young adolescents and model high standards of ethical behavior and professional competence. They are continuous, collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective, critical perspectives on their teaching.

Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession

  1. Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of the students they teach.
    1. Teachers display knowledge of how students learn and of the developmental characteristics of age groups.
    2. Teachers understand what students know and are able to do and use this knowledge to meet the needs of all students.
    3. Teachers expect that all students will achieve to their full potential.
    4. Teachers model respect for students’ diverse cultures, language skills and experiences.
    5. Teachers recognize characteristics of gifted students, students with disabilities and at-risk students in order to assist in appropriate identification, instruction and intervention.
  2. Teachers know and understand the content area for which they have instructional responsibility.
    1. Teachers know the content they teach and use their knowledge of content-area concepts, assumptions and skills to plan instruction.
    2. Teachers understand and use content-specific instructional strategies to effectively teach the central concepts and skills of the discipline.
    3. Teachers understand school and district curriculum priorities and the Ohio academic content standards.
    4. Teachers understand the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas.
    5. Teachers connect content to relevant life experiences and career opportunities.
  3. Teachers understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure student learning.
    1. Teachers are knowledgeable about assessment types, their purposes and the data they generate.
    2. Teachers select, develop and use a variety of diagnostic, formative and summative assessments.
    3. Teachers analyze data to monitor student progress and learning, and to plan, differentiate and modify instruction.
    4. Teachers collaborate and communicate student progress with students, parents and colleagues.
    5. Teachers involve learners in self-assessment and goal setting to address gaps between performance and potential.
  4. Teachers plan and deliver effective instruction that advances the learning of each individual student.
    1. Teachers align their instructional goals and activities with school and district priorities and Ohio’s academic content standards.
    2. Teachers use information about students’ learning and performance to plan and deliver instruction that will close the achievement gap.
    3. Teachers communicate clear learning goals and explicitly link learning activities to those defined goals.
    4. Teachers apply knowledge of how students think and learn to instructional design and delivery.
    5. Teachers differentiate instruction to support the learning needs of all students, including students identified as gifted, students with disabilities and at-risk students.
    6. Teachers create and select activities that are designed to help students develop as independent learners and complex problem-solvers.
    7. Teachers use resources effectively, including technology, to enhance student learning.
  5. Teachers create learning environments that promote high levels of learning and achievement for all students.
    1. Teachers treat all students fairly and establish an environment that is respectful, supportive and caring.
    2. Teachers create an environment that is physically and emotionally safe.
    3. Teachers motivate students to work productively and assume responsibility for their own learning.
    4. Teachers create learning situations in which students work independently, collaboratively and/or as a whole class.
    5. Teachers maintain an environment that is conducive to learning for all students.
  6. Teachers collaborate and communicate with students, parents, other educators, administrators and the community to support student learning.
    1. Teachers communicate clearly and effectively.
    2. Teachers share responsibility with parents and caregivers to support student learning, emotional and physical development and mental health.
    3. Teachers collaborate effectively with other teachers, administrators and school and district staff.
    4. Teachers collaborate effectively with the local community and community agencies, when and where appropriate, to promote a positive environment for student learning.
  7. Teachers assume responsibility for professional growth, performance and involvement as an individual and as a member of a learning community.
    1. Teachers understand, uphold and follow professional ethics, policies and legal codes of professional conduct.
    2. Teachers take responsibility for engaging in continuous, purposeful professional development.
    3. Teachers are agents of change who seek opportunities to positively impact teaching quality, school improvements and student achievement.

Reading Endorsement

  1. Candidates have knowledge of the foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction.
    1. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of psychological, sociological, and linguistic foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction.
    2. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of reading research and histories of reading.
    3. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of language development and reading acquisition and the variations related to culture and linguistic diversity.
    4. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the major components of reading (phonemic awareness, word identification and phonics, vocabulary and background knowledge, fluency, comprehension strategies, and motivation) and how they are integrated in fluent reading.
  2. Candidates use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction.
    1. Candidates use instructional grouping options (individual, small-group, whole-class, and computer based) as appropriate for accomplishing given purposes.
    2. Candidates select, evaluate and use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, and methods, including technology-based practices, for learners at differing stages of development and from differing cultural and linguistic backgrounds.
    3. Candidates use a wide range of curriculum materials in effective reading instruction for learners at different stages of reading and writing development and from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds.
    4. Candidates teach students to connect prior knowledge with new information.
    5. Candidates demonstrate alignment of literacy curriculum and instruction with state and local standards.
  3. Candidates, alone and in collaboration with other educational professionals, use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction.
    1. Candidates use a wide range of assessment tools and practices that range from individual and group standardized tests to individual and group informal classroom assessment strategies, including technology-based assessment tools.
    2. Candidates place students along a developmental continuum and identify students’ proficiencies and difficulties.
    3. Candidates use assessment information to plan, evaluate, and revise effective instruction that meets the needs of all students including those at different developmental stages and those from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.
    4. Candidates communicate results of the assessments to specific individuals (students, parents, caregivers, colleagues, administrators, policymakers, policy officials, community, etc.)
  4. Candidates create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments.
    1. Candidates use students’ interests, reading abilities and backgrounds as foundations for the reading and writing program.
    2. Candidates use a large supply of books, technology-based information, and non-print materials representing multiple levels, broad interests, cultures and linguistic backgrounds to facilitate comprehension.
    3. Candidates model reading and writing enthusiastically as valued life-long activities.
    4. Candidates motivate learners to be life-long readers.
  5. Candidates view professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility.
    1. Candidates display dispositions related to reading and the teaching of reading.
    2. Candidates continue to pursue the development of professional knowledge and dispositions.
    3. Candidates work with colleagues to observe, evaluate, reflect and provide feedback on each other’s practice to improve instruction.
    4. Candidates participate in, initiate, implement, and evaluate professional development programs.
    5. Candidates model ethical professional behavior.
  6. Candidates complete appropriate field and internship experiences in educational settings that include Pre-K-3, Middle and Secondary levels.
    1. Candidates participate in field experiences or internships that are logical, sequential and planned at the PreK, middle and secondary levels. These field experiences or internships are under supervision of certified, licensed, experienced teachers. The field experience or internship hours total a minimum of 100 hours.

Note: Students with licenses other than Early Childhood and Middle Childhood must also meet these Reading goals.

School Psychology (M.Ed./Ed.S.)

2.1Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability

  • School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of assessment and data collection methods for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and programs, and measuring progress and outcomes.
  • As part of a systematic and comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery, school psychologists demonstrate skills to use psychological and educational assessment, data collection strategies, and technology resources and apply results to design, implement, and evaluate response to services and programs.

2.2 Consultation and Collaboration

  • School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems and used to promote effective implementation of services.
  • As part of a systematic and comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery, school psychologists demonstrate skills to consult, collaborate, and communicate with others during design, implementation, and evaluation of services and programs.

2.3 Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills

  • School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence-based curriculum and instructional strategies.
  • School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to use assessment and data-collection methods and to implement and evaluate services that support cognitive and academic skills.

2.4 Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills

  • School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences on behavior and mental health; behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills; and evidence-based strategies to promote social–emotional functioning and mental health.
  • School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to use assessment and data-collection methods and to implement and evaluate services that support socialization, learning, and mental health.

2.5 School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning

  • School psychologists have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote academic outcomes, learning, social development, and mental health.
  • School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to develop and implement practices and strategies to create and maintain effective and supportive learning environments for children and others.

2.6 Preventive and Responsive Services

  • School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health, services in schools and communities to support multi-tiered prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response.
  • School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to promote services that enhance learning, mental health, safety, and physical well-being through protective and adaptive factors and to implement effective crisis preparation, response, and recovery.

2.7 Family–School Collaboration Services

  • School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on children’s learning, socialization, and mental health; and methods to develop collaboration between families and schools.
  • School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to design, implement, and evaluate services that respond to culture and context and facilitate family and school partnership/ interactions with community agencies for enhancement of academic and social–behavioral outcomes for children.

2.8 Diversity in Development and Learning

  • School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity.
  • School psychologists demonstrate skills to provide professional services that promote effective functioning for individuals, families, and schools with diverse characteristics, cultures, and backgrounds and across multiple contexts, with recognition that an understanding and respect for diversity in development and learning and advocacy for social justice are foundations of all aspects of service delivery.

2.9 Research and Program Evaluation

  • School psychologists have knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation methods sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in applied settings.
  • School psychologists demonstrate skills to evaluate and apply research as a foundation for service delivery and, in collaboration with others, use various techniques and technology resources for data collection, measurement, analysis, and program evaluation to support effective practices at the individual, group, and/or systems levels.

2.10 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

  • School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists.
  • School psychologists demonstrate skills to provide services consistent with ethical, legal, and professional standards; engage in responsive ethical and professional decision-making; collaborate with other professionals; and apply professional work characteristics needed for effective practice as school psychologists, including respect for human diversity and social justice, communication skills, effective interpersonal skills, responsibility, adaptability, initiative, dependability, and technology skills.

Teacher Leader Endorsement

  1. Candidates know and demonstrate skill in evidenced-based principles of effective leadership and teacher learning.
    1. Candidates articulate their knowledge of effective leadership to encourage high levels of performance for educators and students.
    2. Candidates demonstrate skill in managing the change process by assisting and supporting teacher learning through professional development.
    3. Candidates understand and apply strategies that assist adult learning and development.
    4. Candidates respect the diversity of the school staff; teachers, administrators, and other personnel.
    5. Candidates engage in reflective practice concerning leadership roles and responsibilities, and encourage reflective practice in others.
    6. Candidates assume leadership roles at the school, district, state or national levels and in professional organizations.
    7. Candidates facilitate the development of efficacy among other teachers in their school and district.
  2. Candidates promote the use of data-based decisions and evidence-based practice.
    1. Candidates serve as building leaders in the development, implementation, and continuous improvement of a comprehensive, cohesive, and integrated school assessment plan grounded in multiple measures and data sources.
    2. Candidates collaboratively analyze assessment data to plan and implement differentiated instruction to meet student needs.
    3. Candidates lead collaborative efforts to develop high quality classroom assessments among grade-level and content-area teachers.
    4. Candidates support teachers in responding to the intervention process by designing, implementing, and gathering appropriate data and evidence.
    5. Candidates identify resources (including instructional technology) and research-based strategies to support the assess-plan-teach-reassess cycle.
  3. Candidates facilitate a collaborative learning culture.
    1. Candidates coach and model collaborative efforts to share knowledge and demonstrate interdisciplinary instruction among teachers.
    2. Candidates nurture open and effective lines of communication with students, parents, other educators, administrators, and the community through professional learning communities.
    3. Candidates work with stakeholders to identify appropriate resources for enhancing collaboration.
    4. Candidates facilitate collaborative professional learning activities for educators, families, and the community.
  4. Candidates participate in developing and supporting a shared vision and clear goals for their schools.
    1. Candidates participate in developing a shared vision for short-term and long term goals for ongoing school reform, and continuous improvement.
    2. Candidates advocate for and initiate increased opportunities for teamwork to promote and support student achievement and other school goals.
    3. Candidates participate in designing practices and structures that create and maintain an effective learning culture.
    4. Candidates support other school leadership team members in advocating and communicating the school’s vision and goals.
  5. Candidates promote and model ongoing professional learning and improved practice within a learning community.
    1. Candidates use their knowledge of professional standards, including the Standards for Ohio Educators to support teachers’ professional growth.
    2. Candidates work effectively with individuals and groups of teachers by demonstrating the skills and competencies needed to teach adult learners.
    3. Candidates demonstrate skills in serving as mentors and coaches to others.
    4. Candidates develop, implement, and evaluate professional development activities for teachers.
    5. Candidates engage in activities that promote reflective practices in others.
    6. Candidates model professional, ethical behavior and expect it from others.

Contact Us

Todd Bruce, Ph.D.
Assistant Provost for Institutional Effectiveness and Advising
AD 133D
216.397.1600

Carey Ann Lopuchovsky
AD 140
216.397.6618