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The majority of events will be held in the Dolan Center for Science and Technology. See the schedule for details on event locations.

The Art Exhibit will be featured in the Grasselli Library’s Tully Atrium the week of the Celebration.

Thanks to Grasselli Library for coordinating the Art Exhibit. Best of Show winners will receive a gift certificate to the Bookstore as selected by a committee from the John Carroll faculty, student, and staff/administrator community (see below for the committee).

Congratulations to our winners!

  • First Place: “Silver and Lace” by Debora Schmitt
  • Second Place: “Kayaks” by Carl Spitznagel
  • Third Place: “The Art of Growing Up” by Nikki Darty

The Artist Reception will be held on Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 1:00 p.m.

Anson, Cathy Ode to Cleveland
Darty, Nikki The Next Generation
Darty, Nikki The Art of Growing Up
Darty, Nikki The Chase
Ferlotti, Rebecca Training Wheels: Manaus, Brazil
Ferlotti, Rebecca The Secret Garden: Jerez, Spain
Ferlotti, Rebecca Irish Step: County Clare, Ireland
Gohlsch, Stephanie Immokalee reflection 2013
Jackson, John Immokalee’s Young Violins
Kus, Sophie Immokalee My Home
Kus, Sophie Reflection on Immokalee Immersion 2013
Kus, Sophie Before the Time of iPads
Kus, Sophie Pink Snow
Marino, Ruta Contained Legacy
Pitingolo, Pat Purpose
Schmitt, Debora Sunflower
Schmitt, Debora Silver & Lace
Schmitt, Debora Purple Galinule
Sefcik, Joshua Life, Collage of my Current Life
Spitznagel, Carl The Poissonnerie: Half-timbered houses
in Alsatian Town of Colmar
Spitznagel, Carl Hote-L
(Rustic B & B in a Swiss alpine village)
Spitznagel, Carl Kayaks (Small boats on a like
Michigan beach)
Ward, Diane Giclee print documenting a year’s worth
of sketchbooking

STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHERS: The Tim Russert Department of Communication & Theatre Arts is holding their second annual photo contest. This year’s theme is “Frame Your World: The Environment.” The deadline to submit is April 2. First, second and third prizes include Sony or Fuji digital cameras, supplied by Van’s Photo in Mentor. Three honorable mentions also will be awarded.

2013 Art Exhibit Judging Committee

  • Dr. Leslie Curtis
  • Sara Stashower
  • Connie Brooks
  • Nehemiah Jackson

2013 Celebration Participant List

This index lists presenters, John Carroll co-authors, and moderators for the paper/panel and poster sessions, presenters at the Scholarly Lunch series and artists in the Art Exhibit at Grasselli Library. Individual letter codes indicate a paper or panel session. The PS code designates the Poster Session on Monday evening. SL code refers to the Scholarly Lunch Series and ART refers to the Art Exhibit. This index is subject to change.

*Honors Students

**Graduate Students

A  
Ashley Aberl I
Cathy Anson ART
B  
Rebecca Bartlett PS.19
Carson Bay** B
Brian Bayer* P
Mary Benson* J
Benjamin Berry PS.27
Haley Bishop PS.31
Tabitha Bowen** PS.16
Megan Boyk PS.5
Danielle Brady* J
Dr. Cecile Brennan PS.34
Dr. Brent Brossmann Q
Joshua Brossmann* Q
Dr. Chrystal Bruce PS.12
William Butler* J
C  
Dr. Maria Cardozo G; J
Sarah Castellano* G
Dr. Paul Challen PS.11
Katelyn Chessler PS.11
Ryan Cox* PS.14
Barbie Curatolo* Q
Sadie Curtin K; L
D  
Esther D’Mello* A
Brittany Danilov** PS.16
Nikki Darty ART
Ellen Day E
Liz Deegan F, I
Joshua DePaul PS.7
Kateri Dillon PS.7
Esther D’Mello PS.3
Maggie Donoghue PS.27
Shannon Doyle E
Ro Drain E
Dr. Rebecca Drenovsky PS.3
Jeffrey Dunn PS.25
Jillian Dunn* L; S
E  
Darcy Egan* G
Dylan Ekstrand PS.23
Michael Elias PS.11
John Escano PS.9
F  
Sephora Fadiga E
Sanam Farooq PS.8
Meagen Farrell** O
Rebecca Ferlotti ART
Maddi Ferrara PS.12
Dr. Margaret Finucane A, K, S
Brian Fitts** PS.34
Dan Frac K
Dr. Theron Ford B
G  
Jennylee Gandarilla E
Gillian Ganley PS.27
Alyssa Giannirakis I
Victoria Giegerich** PS.35
Stephanie Gohlsch ART
Daniel Gonzalez M
Joseph Grace** PS.16
Emily Gray** PS.30
Gina Groeschen E
Patrick Grogan* J
Lauren Gunderman S
Asurupi Gurung K
Greg Gutmann PS.1
H  
Robert Haas N
Dr. Ed Hahnenberg O
Dr. Steve Harf PS.16
Dr. Penny Harris E
Joseph Hayek PS.17
Rachel Hoag** O
Samantha Hoch PS.20; S
Maris Howell PS.5
Kyle Hutnick I
I  
Dr. Abdulrazaq Imam O
J  
Cedric Jackson K
John Jackson ART; F
Shilpa Javali** PS.16
Dr. Jeanne Jenkins PS.30; PS.31; PS.33
Zachary Jester L
Dr. Erin Johnson PS.38
Dr. Angela Jones PS.27
K  
Audra Kane** PS.16
Dr. Julia Karolle-Berg G; J
Matt Kasper PS.8
Dr. Marc Kirschenbaum PS.29
Tara Knight E
Christine Kobyljanec** PS.16
Lara Kollab PS.25
Valerie Korb** PS.16
Dr. James Krukones P
Krysta Kurzynski R
Dr. Sophie Kus ART
Dr. Desmond Kwan PS.11
L  
Dr. Paul Lauritzen D
Rob Law F
Jennifer Lewis PS.33
Ali Link E
Dr. Jim Lissemore PS.5; PS.6; PS.7; PS.8
Susan Long M
Genna Losinski* PS.26
Matt Lowe S
Matt Loya PS.6
M  
Julie Manka PS.12
Ruta Marino ART
David Markovich D; E
Bridget Mason F
Tyler Maxwell PS.15
Matthew Mayher PS.18
Dr. Jennifer McAndrew M
Dr. Sheila McGinn L
Kayla Meckley PS.24
James Menkhaus D
Dan Merhar E
Melissa Mirka PS.6
Lark Moore B
Donal Moorer L
Dr. Helen Murphy PS.23; PS.24; PS.25; PS.26
Jennifer Murphy PS.31
Eric Mustee PS.29
N  
Keiko Nakano M
Kayla Naticchioni* PS.4
O  
Michelle O’Donnell** PS.30
Dr. Mariana Ortega SL
P  
Dr. Daniel Palmer PS.29
Steven Palmieri PS.27
Eric Patterson R
Lauren Penkala E
Joan Petersen** P
Pat Pitingolo ART
Anthony Piunno** PS.16
Ashleigh Pona PS.37
Corrin Powell* PS.38
Kyra Pritchard** PS.16
Kristen Profeta PS.6
Kristen Pungitore** H
R  
Erica Raab Q
Dr. John Rausch PS.35; PS.36
Dr. Kathleen Roskos PS.32
Jonathan McGinn Ruano L
Gabrielle Ruchames* G
S  
Ryan Salata PS.10
Nick Santucci I
Dr. Ralph Saporito PS.2
Cynthia Marco Scanlon B
Jenny Schmidt PS.31
Debora Schmitt ART
Jaclyn Scholtz PS.13
Sharon Schwam** N
Eli Schwersenski** H; PS.36
Wanda Scott C
Joshua Sefcik ART
Dr. Michael Setter PS.10
Dr. Yi Shang SL
Dr. Thomas Short PS.28
Maria Simone A
Jurell Sison D
Sarah Slagle PS.24
Maria Soriano B
Dr. Carl Spitznagel ART
Dr. Mark Storz N
Alex Stultz E
Shannon Sullivan** PS.32
T  
Matthew Tarchick PS.23
John Tash E
Bonnie Taylor M
Dr. Nancy Taylor N
Ryan Teknipp PS.21
Brionna Thomas M
Dr. Megan Thornton SL
Elizabeth Tilley E
Yaritbel Torres-Mendoza* G; PS.2; PS.9
Leah Tremaglio Q
V  
Ann Visintainer** N
W  
Ala’a Wadi* PS.28
Jessica Wagner E
Curtis Walker F
Diane Ward ART
Brittany Webb B
Sean Whalen A
Dontez White E
Dr. Cyrilla Wideman PS.23; PS.24; PS.25; PS.26
Cadia Wiley A
Molly Wilson E
Dr. Brenda Wirkus O
Emilie Wyszynski E
Y  
David Young** H
Z  
Jane Zaleski PS.22
Dr. Charles Zarobila G
Don Zigdon** PS.16

The Poster Session will be held on Monday, April 8, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in the Muldoon Atrium of the Dolan Science Center.

Listed below are the poster presenters and their abstracts.

PS.1: “Under Water Simulation using 3D and parallel computation”
Greg Gutmann, Undergraduate

Understanding the natural processes in our environment is no simple task; however, computer simulation enables us to create a controlled environment in which we may test hypotheses and models. In this work I focus on developing a real-time 3D simulation of an underwater environment. The simulator is an artificial intelligence-based multi-agent heterogeneous system. That is, the environment includes multiple entities which act on their own (agents), of various types, such as different species of animals (heterogeneous), whose behaviors are in part learned from their environmental interactions (artificial intelligence and learning). In order to create this complex system I am taking advantage of the massively parallel processing power of GPU devices, to handle the immense amount of real-time calculations taking place. Then, to better understand the interactions taking place, the simulation will be in a 3D environment with adjustable perspective for easy observation.

PS.2: “Differences in alkaloid defenses in the poison frog Oophaga pumilio between disturbed and undisturbed habitats of Bocas del Toro, Panama”
Yaritbel Torres-Mendoza,** Undergraduate; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Ralph Saporito, Biology

Poison frogs have the ability to sequester and store alkaloids in their skin as a mechanism of defense against predation. Alkaloids in poison frogs are obtained exclusively from the consumption of alkaloid-containing arthropods. As a result, changes in the environment can potentially harm Oophaga pumilio by altering their source of chemical defense. To date, only two conflicting studies have examined the effects of habitat disturbance on poison frogs chemical defenses. This study is another example of the tremendous alkaloid variability within frogs from the same population and between frogs from different populations. Herein, it is shown that the number of mite derived alkaloids increased, while the number of ant derived alkaloids decreased in disturbed sites; demonstrating that habitat disturbance changes the composition of alkaloid-containing arthropods and therefore altering O. pumilio chemical defense.

PS.3: “Light responses and leaf nitrogen of invasive and non-invasive Rosa sp.”
Esther D’Mello, Undergraduate and Dr. Rebecca Drenovsky, Biology

This past summer I started my Senior Honors Project, where I worked at identifying traits associated with the invasiveness of roses. I compared the photosynthetic rates and leaf nitrogen concentrations of non-invasive versus invasive roses, hypothesizing that increased photosynthesis and nitrogen concentration in leaves gave invasive species a survival advantage over non-invasive roses. Understanding the traits that facilitate the spread of invasive species can lead to interventions that may mitigate their negative effects on native environments. For example, photosynthetic rate and nitrogen concentration are traits that can help develop new frameworks and invasive screening tools to predict a species’ potential impact on a particular area.

PS.4: “The Effects of Nutrition on the Academic Achievement of School-Age Children”
Kayla Naticchioni, Undergraduate

With two-thirds of the adult population overweight or obese, the rates of childhood obesity have also risen to thirty-three percent. Just as research about obesity indicates a negative effect on the body and vital organs, obesity also affects the ability to learn. Not only is it the responsibility of the family, but also of the school, to ensure that students have access to foods that promote proper nutrition. There is a formidable link between nutrition programs in schools, such as lunch programs and snack options, and student achievement. This paper will explore the school’s role in the prevention of childhood obesity, as well as additional activities that can be done by the teacher and the school in order to promote healthy lifestyle choices in and out of the classroom environment.

PS.5: “Cholera”
Maris Howell and Megan Boyk, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Jim Lissemore, Biology

Cholera is caused by the bacteria Vibrio cholera that results in dehydration and diarrhea. The bacterium enters the human digestive tract via contaminated food or water. In the small intestine, the bacterium releases a toxin that activates a pathway that results in the release of ions into the lumen of the small intestine. As a result, large amounts of water are taken up into the waste, which causes watery diarrhea. Because the bacterium leaves the body in the feces, contamination occurs when feces reenters the water supply as a result of inadequate sanitation, clean water, and sewage treatment. Cholera is easily treatable without advanced medical care, where roughly 80% of patients can be effectively treated with rehydration alone. However, the social and political structures that contribute to cholera outbreaks in developing countries must be addressed to prevent cholera on a large scale.

PS.6: “Meningococcal Meningitis”
Melissa Mirka, Kristen Profeta, and Matt Loya, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Jim Lissemore, Biology

Meningococcal meningitis is a bacterial form of meningitis,caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis, and it is a serious infection of the thin lining that surrounds the brain and spinal cord known as the meninges. If left untreated, it can cause severe brain damage and is fatal in 50% of cases. Around the world, 10-25% of people carry the bacteria in their nasopharynx at any given time. Globally, there are 1.2 million people infected with meningococcus per year resulting in 135,000 deaths. The highest rates and most frequently occurring epidemics occur in the region of Africa known as the meningitis belt. The meningitis epidemics in the meningitis belt in Africa are a huge public health burden. The WHO has a strategy focusing on case detection and laboratory confirmation, vaccinating all 1-29 year olds in the meningitis belt in Africa, and quick and appropriate management of the infection.

PS.7: “Arsenic Poisoning from Groundwater”
Josh DePaul and Kateri Dillon, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Jim Lissemore, Biology

Poisoning from arsenic, a naturally occurring element, is a global health threat caused primarily by ingestion of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. An estimated 130 million people worldwide are exposed to drinking water with arsenic levels exceeding the limit of 10 ppb established by the World Health Organization. Countries with known cases of arsenic poisoning include Bangladesh, China, Mongolia, and the United States. Inhabitants of developing countries, such as Bangladesh, are particularly susceptible to poisoning due to consumption of groundwater from tube wells. Many tube wells were built by world aid organizations to provide pathogen-free drinking water but now pose as a health threat due to high arsenic concentrations. Health problems associated with the ingestion of arsenic are highly variable and include skin lesions, keratosis, peripheral vascular disease, and cancer. Currently, public health efforts to provide clean drinking water are the primary methods of prevention and treatment. Other treatments vary based on symptoms.

PS.8: “Vitamin A Deficiency”
Matt Kasper and Sanam Farooq, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Jim Lissemore, Biology

Vitamin A is a fat soluble lipoprotein, which plays an important role in normal growth and development. The University of Washington Medical Center states that in order for the body to facilitate this normal growth and development, the recommended daily intake of vitamin A is 1000µg. However, when individuals are not able to acquire this necessary amount of vitamin A, the effects are detrimental, ranging from immune system dysfunction to blindness. Currently, there are 127 million preschool-aged children and 20 million pregnant women who suffer from vitamin A deficiency. Of these affected populations, 800,000 people die from issues related to vitamin A deficiency. UNICEF has released a statement claiming that Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) is “one of the most cost-effective interventions for improving child survival”. As a result, there have been many modes of treatment and prevention of VAD such as food fortification, education, prophylactic supplementation, and public policy.

PS.9: “Diabetic Retinopathy”
John Escano and Yaritbel Torres,** Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Jim Lissemore, Biology

Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and it is a complication that results from diabetes mellitus. Diabetic retinopathy is caused by the damage of tiny blood vessels inside the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. Approximately 700,000 people in the United States are affected by this disease and the number of cases is expected to keep increasing. Those who are males, African American, and Hispanic have a higher probability to develop the disease. Diabetic retinopathy can be prevented by exercising, having a healthy diet, and maintaining a control of one’s blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels, and blood pressure levels. In addition, early detection of diabetic retinopathy it is crucial for the success of the available treatments. As a result, regular comprehensive eye exams are necessary to prevent and control diabetic retinopathy.

PS.10: “Analysis of the Surface Chemistry of Copper Oxide”
Ryan R. Salata, Undergraduate; Dr. Michael P. Setter, Chemistry

Samples of copper oxide were tested to determine how the surface of a powder reacts chemically in comparison to the bulk. Copper, manganese, and zinc concentrations were quantified after dissolution with nitric acid using High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Atomic Absorbance Spectroscopy. The change in the ratio of zinc and manganese to copper demonstrated the reactivity at different depths of the copper oxide powder sample. The study shows that there is a larger zinc to copper ratio on the surface of the powder in comparison to the bulk. Trends also suggest that the manganese to copper ratio steadily increases as the powder is dissolved. Analysis showed that the particle size was a significant factor in surface contamination of zinc and manganese. The smaller particle size showed high ratios of zinc and manganese to copper. This trend was unexpected for the manganese which will require further investigation to confirm this observation.

PS.11: “Synthesis of New Pincer Complex using Grignard Technique”
Katelyn Chessler and Michael Elias, Undergraduates; Dr. Desmond Kwan and Dr. Paul R. Challen, Chemistry

The synthesis of a terphenyl-based pincer ligand is reported. The S-donor pincer ligand framework is generated through the Grignard coupling of 2-bromoanisole with 2-lithium-1,3 dichlorobenzene and molecular iodine. This compound, 2,6-(CH3OC6H4)2C6H3I, is demethylated through a reaction with boron tribromide, and is obtained in solid form. The demethylated product, 2,6-(HOC6H4)2C6H3I is reacted with ClCH2SCH2Cl in the presence of sodium ethoxide to generate the final pincer ligand, 2,6-S(CH2OC6H4)2C6H3I. The compound has been characterized through NMR spectroscopy. This compound will be reacted with Pd2(dba)3, to form the pincer complex. Pincer complexes such as this will be tested for efficiency as catalysts in the Suzuki-Miyaura carbon-carbon coupling reaction. Funding from The Ferro Corporation.

PS.12: “Docking studies of DNA minor groove binder Hx0IP by binding affinity calculations”
Dr. Chrystal D. Bruce, Chemistry; Maddi M. Ferrara and Julie L. Manka, Undergraduates

PS.13: “Trx1 mediated denitrosylation of SNO-GAPDH: an in vitro study”
Jaclyn Scholtz, Undergraduate; Dr. Ritu Chakravarti and Dr. Dennis Stuehr, Pathobiology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a heme protein and its maturation depends upon the glycolytic enzyme, GAPDH. GAPDH undergoes reversible S-nitrosylation (SNO) and denitrosylation by nitric oxide. Denitrosylation of GAPDH in vivo has been shown to be regulated by thioredoxin1 (Trx1). However, Trx1 denitrosylation of SNO-GAPDH in vitro has not been shown. We used purified and cellular GAPDH to study its denitrosylation. We used GSNO to make SNO-GAPDH protein. A reaction mixture consisting of SNO-GAPDH and equimolar Trx1 was added in the presence or absence of associated cofactors. Presence of Trx1 resulted in almost full recovery of both cytsolic and purified GAPDH activity. This led us to conclude that in vitro S-nitrosylation of purified GAPDH yields reversible S-nitrosylation and irreversible modifications whereas cellular GAPDH was protected from irreversible changes. This was confirmed by following changes in GAPDH activity and Trx1 expression in stimulated macrophages. Summer Research Intern at The Cleveland Clinic.

PS.14: “Torin2 Significantly Reduces Proximal Tubular Development of the Xenopus laevis Pronephric Kidney”
Ryan Cox, Undergraduate; Dr. Daniel Romaker and Dr. Oliver Wessely, Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation

One of the central components in regulating cell growth and cell cycle progression is the mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) complex. The mTOR complex consists of two distinct forms, mTORC1 and mTORC2. As aberrant mTOR complex activity is a major causative factor of many diseases including Polycystic Kidney Diseases (PKD), mTOR has become a major therapeutic target in the last decade. Rapamycin was the first macrolide drug known to inhibit mTOR activity, specifically inhibiting mTORC1. Recently, small-molecule-inhibitors are being designed to bind the catalytic domain of mTOR directly and inhibiting both mTORC1 and mTORC2. Using Rapamycin to block mTORC1, proximal tubular growth of Xenopus laevis is able to be partially abrogated. This project investigated whether Torin2 could further inhibit proximal tubular growth by blocking both mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity. Treatment with Torin2 inhibited proximal tubular growth greater than Rapamycin, which indicates both mTORC1 and mTORC2 are involved in proximal tubular development.

PS.15: “NF-κB p65 Methylation by Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is Necessary for the Transcriptional Induction of CXCL10 by TNF”
Tyler Maxwell, Undergraduate; Drs. Daniel Harris, and Paul Dicorleto, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute

The chemokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) initiates the expression of genes involved in the recruitment and adhesion of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Previous work demonstrates that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), an enzyme that methylates protein-incorporated arginine residues, has roles in inflammatory gene expression. We demonstrate here that PRMT5 regulates the transcriptional induction of chemokine CXCL10, a secreted factor that functions primarily as a chemoattractant for pro-inflammatory T-cell populations. To elucidate how PRMT5 induces CXCL10, transcription factors were immunoprecipitated known to be involved in its expression. This determined that the p65 subunit of the NF-kB transcription factor contains the methylated arginine posttranslational modification catalyzed by PRMT5. This modification is not detected when PRMT5 is removed via RNA interference. We are developing site-directed mutations where the modified arginine residues are replaced with other amino acids to test the importance of these residues in the PRMT5-mediated transcriptional induction of CXCL10.

PS.16: “The Wiley©: A Competitive Market Analysis of the First Wireless Lung Stethoscope”
Tabitha Bowen, Brittany Danilov, Joseph Grace, Shilpa Javali, Audra Kane, Christine Kobyljanec, Valerie Korb, Anthony Piunno, Kyra Pritchard, Don Zigdon, Graduate Students; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Steve Harf, Management, Marketing & Logistics

The technological innovations of the past twenty years have brought about a rapid transformation in the healthcare industry. With a focus on minimizing wasted time, energy, and money, the healthcare industry has shifted to digital, wireless medical devises and computerized systems. Yet, despite these changes, one medical device has remained almost unchanged since its invention in 1816. The iconic stethoscope, a daily essential tool of most doctors, is a medical device that is not compatible with the new electronic medical record systems as pulmonary sounds cannot be recorded and saved for future analysis and comparisons. Not only is the stethoscope outdated but it is also potentially hazardous to patients as it harbors and transmits bacteria, viruses, and fungi. This paper presents a competitive market analysis of the Wiley©, a wireless pulmonary monitoring device and one of the latest medical advances in technology invented by Dr. Kevin Trice of Pulmonary Apps, LLC.

PS.17: “Post-translational modifications of PRMT5 regulate its pro-inflammatory activity in endothelial cells”
Joseph M. Hayek, Undergraduate, Drs. Smarajit Bandyopadhyay and Paul E. DiCorleto, Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic

Methylation of protein-incorporated arginine residues by protein arginine methyl-transferases (PRMT) regulate a variety of key cellular processes, including gene expression and protein-protein interactions. We have recently discovered that PRMT5 acts as a pro-inflammatory factor by methylating homeobox transcription factor HOXA9 during cytokine-stimulated EC activation. The enzymatic activity of PRMT5 is regulated by post-translational events such as phosphorylation and binding partners. Our specific hypothesis is that the pro-inflammatory activity of PRMT5 may be regulated by the modulation of its post-translational modification
during cytokine-stimulated EC activation. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, including immunoprecipitation together with mass spectrometry analysis, we have identified several new post-translational modifications of PRMT5. These include methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination. We have mutated the target residues, and are currently determining their impact on the enzymatic activity of PRMT5 and the expression of PRMT5-regulated EC genes, including HOXA9-targets. Knowledge gained from these studies may have implications in the processes of inflammation and vascular diseases.

PS.18: “Does Forest Species Composition Cause the Central Appalachian Climate “Coolspot”?”
Matthew Mayher, Undergraduate; Dr. Brenden McNeil, Geology & Geography, West Virginia University; Kenneth Smith and Christopher Walter, Graduate Students, West Virginia University

Forests in the central Appalachian Mountains (CAM) have a double benefit for mitigating climate change; they exhibit high albedo and high uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide. I hypothesize that a unique forest species composition in the CAM not only causes the canopy architecture to be more horizontal, and thus more reflective of sunlight, but it also causes high canopy N, which is physiologically linked to high uptake of atmospheric carbon. Species composition was measured by making ordinal estimates of canopy cover and visually assessing canopy profiles, while canopy structure was measured using hemispherical photographs
taken at ordinal points in each plot. I hypothesize that species composition will influence LAD and that plots with more horizontal (lower) LAD will have high canopy-level albedo. Understanding the driving factors of canopy-level albedo is important in estimating how forests help to mitigate the effects of climate change. Funding from the WVU Department of Geology and Geography, Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, and Office of the Provost, as well as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Science Foundation (NSF).

PS.19: “Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) positively regulates angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro”
Rebecca Bartlett, Undergraduate; Dr. Joel Boerckel, Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation and Dr. Paul E. DiCorleto, Cell Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation

I will be submitting my official abstract the week of March 10, 2013.

PS.20: “Change in Depression Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease Patients After Deep Brain Stimulation”
Samantha Hoch, Undergraduate; Dr. Darlene Floden, Neuropsychology, The Cleveland Clinic

Objective: 1. To examine the dimensions underlying self-reported depression symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). 2. To determine whether changes in depression symptoms after Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation (STN-DBS) are attributable to changes in physical function and medication burden. We hypothesized that a 2-factor model would appropriately characterize depression symptoms in PD and that, after DBS, better mood would be associated with better motor function and higher medication levels. Both emotional and somatic mechanisms influence depression ratings in PD but only the latter are influenced by STN-DBS. Nonetheless, improved motor function and medication changes do not influence self-rated somatic depression symptoms. This has implications for understanding the mechanisms of depression in advanced PD and argues against a ‘mood-enhancing’ role of dopamine medication in this
population.

PS.21: “Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylase Preserve Aging Axons After An Ischemic Attack”
Ryan Teknipp, Undergraduate; Sabina Bhatta; Sylvain Brunet; Dr. Selva Baltan, Neuroscience, Cleveland Clinic Foundation Lerner Research Institute

Stroke is a burdening issue on human life as its risk factor increases with age. Drugs that inhibit histone deacetylase (HDAC) were shown to preserve and promote recovery in neuronal function after stroke. The HDAC inhibitor was studied by isolating the optic nerve from 1 month and 12 month old mice, administering the drug during the ischemic attack (deprivation of glucose and oxygen). The results indicated that HDAC inhibition can preserve white matter function from 1 month and 12 month old mice when applied during an ischemic attack. The white matter axons remained functional during ischemia and recovered to 60% of control levels. These results provide the evidence that drugs that can inhibit HDAC in axons can delay the destructive effects of ischemia on the nervous system, making HDAC inhibitors an intriguing candidate as a therapeutic drug for stroke therapy.

PS.22: “Age-dependent activity of nitric oxide synthase during ischemic white matter injury”
J. Zaleski, Undergraduate; A. Bachleda A. Runkle, S. Brunet, and S. Baltan, Neuroscience, Cleveland Clinic Foundation Lerner Research Institute

White matter (WM) is injured in most strokes and axonal injury and dysfunction contribute to disability associated with clinical deficits. Because excitotoxicity leads to oxidative stress in WM, we investigated whether blocking nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity before or after a period ofoxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) promoted axon function in an age-dependent manner. Acutely isolated optic nerves (MONs) from young and old (1 and 12 month) mice were used to ascertain quantitative measurements of WM function and structure. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of brain NOS (bNOS) co-localized with GFAP (+) astrocytes and NF-200 (+) axons. Evoked compound action potentials (CAPs) recovered better after OGD in young and old MONs in the presence of L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. Treatment of MONs after OGD with L-NAME promoted CAP recovery in young but not in old MONs. Changes in NOS activity help unveil age-dependent oxidative injury mechanisms in white matter.

PS.23: “The Effects of Modafinil (Provigil) on Working Memory in Rats”
Dylan Ekstrand and Matthew Tarchick, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsors Dr. Helen M. Murphy and Dr. Cyrilla H. Wideman, Neuroscience Program

Amphetamines and their derivatives have been widely abused by students to improve their cognitive performance. Amphetamines are schedule II drugs with a high abuse potential. However, a relatively new drug modafinil has become increasingly popular with students as a neuroenhancer. The current study observed the effects of modafinil on spatial working memory in rats along with the effects of drug withdrawal. The study examined body weight, food intake, and water intake of the rats throughout the experiment. A daily 64mg/kg body weight dose of modafinil was administered during a three week experimental period which caused a significant improvement in the spatial working memory of the experimental group. There was no significant difference in body weight, food intake, water intake, and adiposity of the rats. The results suggest that modafinil can be considered a less potent alternative to amphetamines for the improvement in cognitive performance with minimal side effects.

PS.24: “Effects of Orally Administered Phentermine on Anxiety, Body Weight, and Food and Water Consumption in Rats”
Sarah Slagle and Kayla Meckley, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsors Dr. Helen M. Murphy and Dr. Cyrilla H. Wideman, Neuroscience Program

Obesity is a growing epidemic not only within the United States, but also worldwide. The present experiment examined the effects of the weight-loss drug, phentermine, on several variables including body weight, food and water consumption, activity levels, anxiety, and behavior. Twelve rats were divided into control and experimental groups. Following a 2 week habituation period, the experimental rats were given a 30 mg/kg body weight dose of phentermine in a condensed milk treat for an experimental period of 19 days followed by a one week withdrawal period. Control rats received the condensed milk treat with distilled water. Anxiety was measured using the Elevated Plus Maze. At the conclusion of the experiment, renal and mesenteric adiposity were also evaluated. Results show that phentermine caused the experimental rats to gain less weight, increase activity levels, decrease anxiety, decrease adiposity levels, and alter behavior.

PS.25: “The Effect of Varenicline on Memory in Male Long-Evans Rats”
Jeffrey Dunn and Lara Kollab, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsors Dr. Helen M. Murphy and Dr. Cyrilla H. Wideman, Neuroscience Program

Effects of the smoking-cessation aid, varenicline (Chantix), on learning and memory were evaluated in 12 male Long-Evans rats. Following a four-day habituation period, 6 rats were assigned to the experimental group and received a single 3 mg/kg body weight oral dose of varenicline daily for 15 days in a condensed milk treat. Six control animals received the treat containing distilled water only. Learning and memory were assessed using the Morris Water Maze, according to the procedure of Vorhees and Williams (2006). Body weight, food and water intake, and activity were monitored daily. Results indicate that the use of varenicline does not produce cognitive deficits related to learning and memory or in increases in body weight. Interestingly, three of the experimental rats discontinued varenicline consumption before the conclusion of the experimental period, most likely do to drug-induced nausea and consequent taste aversion.

PS.26: “The Effects of Cognitive Intervention Training and Exercise on Memory Efficacy of Alzheimer’s Disease At-Risk Elders”
Genna Losinski, Undergraduate; Dr. Stephen Rao, Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health; Faculty Sponsors Dr. Helen M. Murphy and Dr. Cyrilla H. Wideman, Neuroscience Program

The effects of cognitive intervention training and exercise in patients labeled ‘at-risk’ for Alzheimer’s disease were examined. Sixty-eight adults, aged 60-85 with a positive family history of Alzheimer’s disease, participated in a 12-week controlled clinical trial at the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions: cognitive intervention, exercise intervention, or control group. A standardized battery of neuropsychological tests was administered at week 1 and at week 12. In addition, a physical activity survey was completed each week. Results indicated a statistically significant difference between the cognitive intervention group and the control group for 2 of the 4 neuropsychological tests. Findings are discussed in the context that cognitive intervention programs could lead to increased memory skills in at-risk Alzheimer’s disease adults. Also, exercise interventions must be reevaluated before any definitive conclusion can be drawn concerning the efficacy of this treatment.

PS.27: “Explicit and Implicit Prejudice Affected by Homosexual Experimenter”
Steven Palmieri, Benjamin Berry, Maggie Donoghue, Gillian Ganley, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Angela Jones, Psychology

This study examines whether the presence of someone perceived as gay influences heterosexuals’ explicit and implicit prejudice towards homosexuals. We found that heterosexuals exhibited less prejudice when in the presence of a homosexual on both explicit and implicit measures. Heterosexuals were less likely to express prejudice when observed by someone perceived as gay compared to someone perceived as heterosexual or when alone. The differences in the IAT scores between the “gay experimenter” condition and the other two suggest that participants experience a change in implicit prejudicial cognition when with someone perceived as gay. Typical predictors of sexual prejudice, such as religiosity or male gender, are shown to no longer correlate when the participant is with a homosexual. Taken together, these findings suggest that the reduction of explicit sexual prejudice may be partially due to implicit cognitive changes.

PS.28: “Analysis of Music Note Patterns via Markov Chains”
Ala’a Wadi, Undergraduate; Dr. Thomas Short, Mathematics & Computer Science

This is a presentation of a novel method for measuring the distance between two seemingly analogous fragments of music, as deemed by human perception. This is an approach entirely based on coarse-grained and primitive representations of the order of the notes that make up the songs. Through the use of a simplified Markov chain analysis, transition matrices are derived for each music piece and compared through linear algebraic techniques. Via the use of a Markov chain analysis and matrix algebra, we discover hypothesized results of small-distanced values and unforeseen values that were initially thought to be small but actually indicate large distances between music compositions. Since notes are the foundations to music, these results relate to the identities of separate music compositions by distinctive artists in disparate genres.

PS.29: “Supporting Dynamic and Robust Evaluations of Decentralized Human Assisted Swarms”
Eric Mustee, Undergraduate; Faculty Sponsors Dr. Daniel Palmer and Dr. Marc Kirschenbaum, Mathematics & Computer Science

Many problems are efficiently solved by humans using a top-down approach while other problems naturally lend themselves to a decentralized bottom-up strategy as demonstrated by swarms. The focus here is to combine both problem solving strategies to demonstrate how forming a human assisted swarm (HAS), for certain problem domains, can lead to improvement over humans and swarms working independently. This paper describes the modification of an existing tool used to study the benefits of a human assisted swarm. Modifications were made to allow for both efficient data collection and higher fidelity in modeling the swarm behavior. The data collection uses a human assisted swarm to solve digital jigsaw puzzles as the problem domain.

PS.30: “School Psychologists as Systems-Level Consultants”
Michelle O’Donnell and Emily Gray, Graduate Students, and Dr. Jeanne Jenkins, Education & Allied Studies

We will present survey results involving the processes and perceptions related to building level changes involving collaboration between school principals and school psychologists. There is a lack of research from both principal and school psychologist perspectives in this area. Participants will learn which areas of
systems level changes involve school psychologists as consultants, suggested areas for expansion of that consultation role, what is working, and potential
barriers.

PS.31: “Teacher Perceptions of Consultative PracticesThat Facilitate RTI at the Elementary Level”
Haley K. Bishop, M.Ed., Jennifer L. Murphy, M.Ed., Jenny R. Schmidt, M.Ed., & Jeanne E. Jenkins, Ph.D

The implementation of RTI changed the way teachers are required to deliver educational services to students. Due to this, the consultative relationship between school psychologists and teachers has also changed. By gaining the perspective of teachers in regards to their attitudes towards the consultative relationship as related to RTI implementation, school psychologists can gain insight into ways in which to strengthen their consultative role, increase teacher support, and better
implement RTI in the schools.

PS.32: “A Small-Scale Study of the Effects of Supplemental Vocabulary Instruction on Preschoolers With Vocabulary Delays”
Dr. Kathleen Roskos, Education & Allied Studies and Shannon Sullivan, Graduate Student

Research on preschool vocabulary instruction has increased considerably in the last decade stimulated by the surge of educational attention on early literacy development and achievement. Based on evidence that the volume of word learning in the early years has a profound impact on future reading comprehension, studies have focused on teaching practices and interventions that support vocabulary development in young children, especially those with vocabulary delays. In
general, this research shows the benefits of direct and intensified vocabulary instruction in promoting vocabulary development and growth, although specific features of implementation vary (e.g., word selection). Studies, however, also consistently show that those children with weak vocabularies make gains, but not enough to overcome the drag of delay on their progress. In this study we investigate whether more of the same can improve the vocabulary gains of preschoolers with delays, testing the design strength of an instructional supplement used in prior research.

PS.33: “Teacher Knowledge and Perceptions of Emotional Disturbances: Improving Consultation”
Jennifer Lewis, M.Ed., Kristen Marvinney, M.Ed., Robert Richardson, M.Ed.; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Jeanne Jenkins, Education & Allied Studies

The current study seeks to contribute to an understanding of how consultation can effectively facilitate a best practice approach to identifying and providing services for children with an emotional disturbance (ED). A national sample of teachers were surveyed about their knowledge of ED and their experiences consulting with school psychologists about behaviors symptomatic of ED. Participants will gain knowledge of teachers’ understanding about ED and types of school psychological consultation experiences perceived as effective.

PS.34: “An Examination of AR 120, First-Generation College Students, and John Carroll University”
Brian Fitts, Graduate Student; Faculty Sponsor Dr. Cecile Brennan, Education & Allied Studies

First-Generation College Students (FGCS) are students who are the first from their family to attend a four-year college or university, and tend to experience more barriers in their transition from high school to college. JCU has recently begun offering a course (AR 120) geared toward, but not restricted to, students identified as FGCS. The current research focused on the effectiveness of AR 120. Students were given a 10 item questionnaire and asked to rate their current levels of stress in various areas (academics, social, etc.) on a scale of 1-5, with 1 being the lowest and 5 being the highest. The questionnaire was administered at the beginning and end of the semester. Interviews were conducted with three instructors and one student. Results indicated that JCU is effective in helping FGCS in their transition from high school to college. More research is needed regarding the effectiveness of AR 120.

PS.35: “Asperger’s Syndrome: A Systems Perspective for Working with Youth with Asperger’s and Their Families”
Victoria Giegerich, Graduate Student, Dr. John Rausch, Education & Allied Studies, and Alicia Pascoe, M.Ed.

Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) typically represents the highest functioning people who are diagnosed within the Autism Spectrum Disorders. AS involves many issues including communication barriers, inability to read social cues, and social isolation. AS often remains undiagnosed until a later age resulting in poor communication skills, negative peer interactions, social ostracization, and potential psychopathology. Parents often advocate for their child, and fight to ensure their child is not misrepresented in order to encourage their child’s ability to succeed through the best education and services there are to offer. The authors conducted a qualitative grounded theory study with 15 families who had a child with AS via interviews with the mothers, fathers, and the children who have AS. The goal of the study was to examine the experience of AS from a family systems perspective. Interview results included topics such as the diagnostic process,
advocacy, interventions, social dynamics, and coping strategies.

PS.36: “The Association Between Bullying and Mental Illness”
Eli Schwersenski, Graduate Student; Faculty Sponsor Dr. John Rausch, Education & Allied Studies

The current study sought to investigate the long term effects of bullying. Research has shown that bullying during childhood can lead to mental illness in adulthood. This study investigated the association between childhood bullying and adult mental illness, specifically depression. The study included five female participants between the ages of 24-40. The females volunteered to participate in the study and were interviewed on how they perceive the bullying they experienced during childhood, and how it has affected them in their adult lives. Results of the study indicated that childhood bullying does affect the lives of adults. However, it is unclear if childhood bullying leads to increased levels of depression as adults. The results of the study are inconclusive and require further investigation. This may be due to the small sample size, or because most of the participants were teachers. Further research is needed in order to fully investigate the long term effects of childhood bullying.

PS.37: “Psychological Predictors of Body Image Dissatisfaction 3-months after Bariatric Surgery”
Ashleigh Pona, Undergraduate; Dr. Leslie Heinberg, Dr. Megan Lavery, Dr. Julie Merrell, Bariatric and Metabolic Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Although studies on bariatric surgery have associated postoperative weight loss with improvement in body image, some individuals continue to feel dissatisfied with their body image after bariatric surgery. The present study explored preoperative factors that may predict body image problems 3-months after bariatric surgery. Data were analyzed from bariatric patients who completed the “Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Second Edition, Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF).” Scales measuring depression and self-esteem were examined, and medical records were reviewed. Patients who scored higher on scales measuring demoralization, low positive emotions, ideas of persecution, self-doubt, and inefficacy were significantly more likely to struggle with body image problems 3-months after bariatric surgery, in addition to patients with a preoperative depression diagnosis, current psychotropic medication usage, and history of outpatient therapy and medication. Results suggest that bariatric surgery candidates with psychopathology and psychological risk factors may be more vulnerable to body image problems early after bariatric surgery.

PS.38: “A Philological, Epidemiological, and Clinical Analysis of the Plague of Athens”
Corrin Powell, Undergraduate; Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Erin Johnson, Biology

In the summer of 430 B.C. during the Peloponnesian War, a plague hit Athens a few days after the Spartans besieged the city. The plague raged continuously in the city for two years and broke out again in 427 B.C. Most of the population was infected and approximately 25% of the population died. Thucydides wrote History of the Peloponnesian War, which is main literary source for the plague and other events in the Peloponnesian War. Although Thucydides took great pains to carefully describe the clinical features of the disease, physicians and classicists have disagreed on the identification of the causative agent. In the past hundred years scholars have argued for over 39 causative agents, but no conclusive argument has been made for a particular causative agent. In order to narrow down the possible causative agents, I used a descriptive epidemiological analysis of Thucydides’ description to determine modes of transmission.

PS.39: “Modeling the Mechanism of Circadian KaiC Phosphorylation in Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus”
Andrew McElroy, Undergraduate

Until recently, it was believed that the mechanisms for circadian rhythm in all organisms were very complex, requiring many cofactors which were difficult to identify. However, Nakajima et al. showed that one organism, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, contains three clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, that, when purified and mixed with ATP, produce circadian oscillations in vitro1. In this project, an attempt to determine the mechanism for these circadian oscillations is made; building on previously published work2 of Dr. David Lubensky, professor at the University of Michigan. The approach relies on relatively simple mass-action kinetics to model the system. Two adaptions of the van Zon model2 were attempted: slowing the binding rate of KaiB and introducing a dimer/tetramer interaction to the model. Unfortunately, both of these mechanisms failed to model the experimental oscillating system. Proving that this simple model is most likely not the mechanism controlling this phenomenon.

PS.40: “Two-probe Electrical and Thermal Transport Measurements on 50-micron Long Single Crystal ZnGeN2 Rods”
*John Colvin, Undergraduate; Dr. Jeffrey Dyck, Department of Physics, John Carroll University; Paul Quayle, Graduate student; Dr. Kathleen Kash, Department of Physics,Case Western Reserve University

While many modern electrical devices are based on III-nitride semiconductors such as GaN,these devices have some challenges related to the strong polarity of the wurtzite crystal structure and a difficulty in doping them p-type. ZnGeN2, an analog to GaN, has a number of distinctly different predicted properties, however; in particular, its doping and defect properties and lower spontaneous polarization coefficients. So far, the electrical transport properties of ZnGeN2 are not well studied. Recently 50-micron long single crystal rods have been grown by a vapor-liquid-solid method. Electrical transport measurements are difficult on such small crystals. In this work, we will present a novel sample stage designed to perform 2-probe electrical measurements on these small crystals, enabling measurements of Seebeck coefficient and resistance. We will discuss modeling of Seebeck coefficient data for ZnGeN2 and the design, fabrication, and performance of sample stage prototypes. Funded by the National Science Foundation.

PS.41: “Effects of pH on Surface Electrical Properties of Indium Nitride and Zinc Oxide”
Brian Washburne, Undergraduate; Dr. Jeffery Dyck, Advisor, John Carroll University; Dr. Kathy Kash, Case Western Reserve University

Indium nitride (InN) is a semiconductor with a bandgap that makes it a material of interest for visible light emitting technologies like full color displays. However, the surface of InN has properties that confuse attempts to characterize the intrinsic electric properties of the material. The pH in the unavoidable water layer on the surface of InN can affect the exchange of electrons between the water layer and the surface of InN, this alters the electrical properties of InN. With a goal of further clarifying our understanding of this exchange of electrons, resistance measurements of InN were taken under the influence of three different levels of pH in ambient humid air. An InN sample was contained in the presence of solutions of a low, neutral, and high pH. There were measurable changes in resistance with changes in pH. Initial changes in resistance were in agreement with predictions. Funding was provided by the National Science Foundation.

PS.42 “Work/Home Balance as a Predictor of Professional and Personal Satisfaction”
Kathleen Patton, Undergraduate; Jerry Kiffer, M.A., Executive Health Department, Cleveland Clinic Foundation

While we live in a time that perpetuates the novelty of having it all, such expectations may not always be realistic. More often, specifically between the important domains at work and home, the goal is balance, and a lack of balance may lead to decreased satisfaction. The aim of the current study was to identify the relationship between work/home balance and satisfaction levels in professional and personal domains. Data from Executive Health reports from September 2011-July 2012 were used, with each patient having completed a fifteen-item subjective well-being inventory, the Spreadsheet of Life and Responsibilities (SOLAR 15). Items addressed satisfaction in areas of work, body, mind, and loving relationships, as well as overall life satisfaction. Results suggest that home/work balance significantly predicted satisfaction for both the home and work domains, and furthermore, the gender, marital status, age, and work hours invested by the patients played significant roles in their sense of work/home balance and satisfaction levels.

PS.43 Appalachia Immersion Trip
Megan Lowes

Appalachia is a region in the United States that is spread over thirteen states. Appalachia is a unique in the fact that it is a very impoverished area, and not really as advanced as other parts of the country. West Virginia is the only state that is completely in Appalachia and it is also the state that has the most coal mining. While on this trip, we learned the issues surrounding coal mining and the pros and cons associated with it. Some of the pros of coal mining include providing jobs and bringing wealth to the area, while cons consist of dangerous working conditions and potential health risks. We were able to witness the devastation of coal mining, which included seeing first hand effects of mountaintop removal. Seeing the effects and hearing the stories helped us learn about how this process can cause damages to the environment.

We are proud to partner with the following departments on these special events for the 2013 Celebration:

MONDAY, April 8, 2013
1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Holocaust Remembrance Day Events

Sponsored by the Department of Theology & Religious Studies and others
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies

1:30-2:00 p.m. Memorial Ceremony
Led by David Markovich, Founding President
Hillel at John Carroll University

2:00-3:30 p.m. Presentation
“Am I My Neighbor’s Keeper? Dynamics of Moral Courage for Holocaust Rescuers”
Fern Ruth Levy, M.S., M.A.J.S.
Director and Founder of the Anne Frank Moral Courage Project of Cleveland

5:00-6:00 p.m. Book Signing by Marian Morton
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
Dr. Morton will be signing copies of her latest book “John Carroll University (The Campus History).”

TUESDAY, April 9, 2013
6:30 p.m. Mitsui Distinguished Lecture
“China’s Future in a Multi-nodal World”
Featuring Brantly Womack
CK Yen Chair, The Miller Center of Public Affairs
Professor of Foreign Affairs, Department of Politics
University of Virginia
Sponsored by East Asian Studies
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

7:30 p.m. The Tuohy Lecture Series
“The (Second) Coming: Messiahs, Jesus and the Mahdi”
Featuring David L. Barr, Ph.D.
Sponsored by the Department of Theology and Religious Studies
Dolan Science Center, A202/203 [NOTE ROOM CHANGE]

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2013
5-7:30 p.m. Special Event
“Crisis Mapping Training Session” featuring an overview of basic techniques and tools used in crisis mapping
Presenter: Dr. Jen Ziemke and Dr. Colin Swearingen, Political Science
Dolan Science Center, E240
Open to the JCU Community only.
Crisis mappers leverage technology to present and analyze real-time reports from people “on the ground” in humanitarian emergencies. That information helps first responders and other key personnel make decisions and take action more effectively during crises. (Learn more about crisis mapping in this John Carroll University magazine article.) Registration for the session is required, as space is limited. Please note that participants will be required to bring a laptop computer.

7:00 p.m. Applied Ethics Lecture
“Who is Watching Us Online and Should They Stop?”
Featuring: Kirsten Martin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Strategic Management & Public Policy
George Washington University
Sponsored by the Program in Applied Ethics
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

Questions about privacy online focus on individuals and their choice to go online and message friends, look for a mortgage rate, research a family member’s disease, or browse for dog toys. Instead, I wish to focus on the responsibilities of the unseen tracking companies (trackers) watching us online when they decide to enter our online community.

The goal of this presentation is to identify the different roles and responsibilities of the many actors online within the current network of surveillance and tracking. I suggest tracking companies play three possible roles – as a member of a supply chain of information traders, within a network of surveillance online, and as an arm of law enforcement. I illustrate how different trackers fall into these three different roles online.

THURSDAY, April 11, 2013
5 p.m. Speaker Event

“College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be”
Featuring Andrew Delbanco
Mendelson Family Chair of American Studies and
Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities
Columbia University
Sponsored by the Provost and Academic Vice President’s Office
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

Dr. Delbanco will be speaking on his book “College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be.”

Visit the 2013 Schedule for presentations times and locations.

Tuesday Sessions | Wednesday Sessions | Thursday Sessions

Tuesday Sessions

A. “Arrupe Scholar Senior Capstone” Panel 1
Panel Moderator: Dr. Margaret Finucane, CSSA
Presenters: Sean Whalen, Maria Simone, Asurupi Gurung, Esther D’Mello, Undergraduates

B.1 “The Null Curriculum and the US Eugenics Movement: The Under Education of America”
Lark Moore and Brittany Webb, Undergraduates; Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Theron Ford, Education & Allied Studies

This study seeks to determine how many students, enrolled in Jesuit University and plan to pursue a career in education. (a) know what the null curriculum is and (b) have learned of the eugenics movement in the United States. These concepts are interconnected as the first reports on how certain topics, historic events, and groups are routinely omitted from the curriculum of US schools. The second is one such topic—the eugenics movement, and this project will explain the history of the movement, its proponents, goals and actions, particularly as related to African Americans. One outcome of this study is an understanding of how conservative political and social forces continue to shape education policy and practice so as to perpetuate a distorted picture of the nation’s history; resulting in the mythology of a highly moral Christian democracy. All educators, in all contexts, need to cultivate a rich understanding not only of the formal curriculum but of the hidden and null curriculums as well, which should include a diverse historical perspective.

B.2 “The Lion of the Apocalypse – Messiah Fierce and Wild”
Carson Bay, Graduate Student

In John’s Apocalypse, Jesus appears from cover to cover as the hero of the story. In Revelation 5:5, Jesus is introduced as “the lion of the tribe of Judah,” and is referred to thereafter as a “lamb.” Why the switch? John is concerned with presenting his audience with a comprehensive apocalyptic worldview which will bring thought and action in line with God’s plan for the world. John employs a world of imagery in order to drive home his point that Jesus has won/is winning/will win, and thus the life of the one who is faithful to him is secure. John’s rhetorical refrain of guaranteed victory for Jesus’ followers is communicated forcefully in the use of an image constituting ferocity, power and strength: the insuperable lion!

B.3 “When WAC Becomes TAC: The Shifting Roles of FYC Classrooms and Instructors”
Maria Soriano, Writing Center

While many WAC theorists pinpoint a disconnect between writing taught in FYC and other classrooms, they simultaneously assert that “writing is everybody’s business.” Yet, FYC instructors feel pressure from across the curriculum to adequately prepare students for college-level writing. First, I argue that the pressure to prepare first-year students to write across the curriculum inadvertently and inevitably shifts the focus of FYC—and therefore, the roles of FYC instructors—from a focus on rhetorical strategies for composition to strategies for meeting genre/content expectations. Second, FYC classrooms can function as sites of cross-curricular instruction without sacrificing FYC objectives. Finally, I offer practical strategies for FYC teachers to incorporate cross-curricular dialogue and writing into their courses to close the gap between FYC and other disciplines. Implementing these strategies assists students as they learn how to write across the curriculum within the FYC classroom, therefore creating it as a site of connection.

C. “The 21st Century Classroom: Effective Teaching Strategies for the Interfaith and Intergenerational Classroom”
Wanda Scott, Theology & Religious Studies

This workshop will focus on combining pedagogical and andragogical strategies to overcoming the challenges of creating effective interfaith and intergenerational dialogue within an academic environment. The techniques presented can be utilized in most academic settings where religious diversity is the topic and also when working with intergenerational groups. Diversity in the classroom has many benefits to both the student and teacher. A diverse group of students fosters an engaging class discussion. However, there can be challenges to open dialogue especially if students have misconceived notions about academic discussion of religion, misconceptions of other religions and if there are generational gaps that create isolation within the classroom. The goal of the instructor is to identify the experiences of all the students, anticipate potential barriers and employ effective collaborative learning techniques and engaging exercises to create a positive learning environment.

D.1 “Older Jews in the Soviet Union: Oral Histories”
David Markovich, Undergraduate

This study will help provide rare insight into the lives of Jewish senior citizens who lived in the Soviet Union prior to immigration to the United States through documenting their stories. These stories are in the process of being chronicled as a token of remembrance for those who faced persecution, and to also help future generations learn about a difficult era which should not be forgotten. Three major research questions will be answered in this study: 1) How did your life growing up as a Jew in the Soviet Union differ from your life now? 2) What types of religious persecution did you experience and how did you cope? and 3) What lessons would you like others to learn from your experiences? The commonalities among the 5 interviewees will be discussed and a video of one of the oral histories shown.

D.2 “The Development of Doctrine and the Debate Surrounding the Declaration on Religious Freedom”
Jurell G. Sison, Graduate Student

The paper highlights the debate surrounding Dignitates Humanae (DH), The Declaration on Religious Freedom, passed by the Second Vatican Council in 1965. Distinguished as the most contested document of the council, Sison explores its contents, historical context, and the hostile debate amongst the bishops at Vatican II. While the document highlighted religious freedom, the development of doctrine was the actual topic of debate. Although the bishops understood the need for religious freedom, many were terrified that it would clash with church tradition. Sison, however, uses the methods of John Henry Newman, John Thiel, and Avery Dulles to argue that DH is not contrary to church tradition but is instead in harmony with it. Moreover, Sison makes an honest attempt to make sense of the debates in their context, in hopes of understanding the debate’s implications for the twenty-first century.

D.3 “Can Solidarity Exist?”
James Menkhaus, Theology & Religious Studies

One of the pillars of Catholic Social Teaching and an important component of Jesuit education is the concept of solidarity. As former superior general of the Jesuits, Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, stated in his address at Santa Clara University in 2000, “Personal involvement with innocent suffering, with the injustices others suffer, is the catalyst for solidarity, which then gives rise to intellectual inquiry and moral reflection.” While interaction with innocent suffering can usually cause someone to undergo moral reflection, it is more ambiguous how this encounter should create solidarity. Applying my dissertation research, this presentation will question if solidarity is a worthy goal for Jesuit education and immersion programs, or if solidarity is a utopian concept that is unachievable.

E. “ASIA Youth Program Evaluation Project”
Panel Moderator: Dr. Penny Harris, Sociology & Criminology
Presenters: Emilie Wyszynsk, David Markovich, Alex Stultz, Shannon Doyle, Molly Wilson, Tara Knight, Dan Merhar, Ro Drain, Ellen Day, Sephora Fadiga, Gina Groeschen, Ali Link, Lauren Penkala, John Tash, Dontez White, Elizabeth Tilley, Jennylee Gandarilla, and Jessica Wagner, Undergraduates

In Fall 2012, Dr. Harris’ “Poverty, Welfare, and Social Justice in the U.S.” course conducted a program evaluation of the Dream School, a youth after school enrichment and drug prevention program of ASIA, INC. ASIA is a non-profit organization serving the Asian American and Pacific Islander population in Cleveland. The evaluation was conducted by 3 student research teams. It involved 42 individual qualitative interviews conducted on three participant groups (children, parents, teachers/administrators) which had experience with Dream School. The qualitative findings were then analyzed by common themes and presented in such a way as to offer a broad overview of the program’s success as well as recommendations for improvement. Overall, it was concluded that Dream School has had a significant impact in improving the academics, particularly language skills, and social skills of the participants, and no major changes were recommended.

F. “The We the People Service-Learning Program”
Panel Moderator: Liz Deegan, Center for Service & Social Action
Presenters: John Jackson, Curtis Walker, Rob Law, Bridget Mason, Undergraduates

The We the People Service-Learning Program includes three programs in which John Carroll tutors work with students in underserved area schools. In the 5th grade We the People program, teams of three or four tutors visit classrooms weekly to educate students about the US Constitution and citizenship. Students compete each spring in the Mock Congressional Hearing on JCU’s campus. Youth for Justice is pilot program in which 8th grade students identify an injustice in the community and, with the assistance of JCU tutors, research the issue, develop an action plan, and create a proposed solution to present to a panel of judges. Finally, in Project Citizen, JCU tutors work alongside tenth grade students to research an issue that they identify as a problem in their community and propose a policy change to civic leaders. Panels of JCU tutors will discuss the impact of the We the People Service Learning Program.

Wednesday Sessions

G. Honors Panel 1
Panel Moderators: Dr. Maria Marsilli Cardozo and Dr. Julia Karolle-Berg

(G.1) Yaritbel Torres Mendoza: “Differences in alkaloid defenses in the poison frog Oophaga pumilio between disturbed and undisturbed habitats of Bocas del Toro, Panama.”

(G.2) Gabrielle Ruchames: “Une Beauté Noire: L’ambigu chez l’Hélène de Jean Giraudoux.”

(G.3) Darcy Egan: “Is Chivalry Really Dead? – An Exploration of Chivalry and Masculinity in Medieval and American Literature.”

(G.4) Sarah Castellano: “An Investigation of the Role of Distinctiveness on the Production Effect”

H.1 “Framing the Unfilmable: Harold Pinter’s Adaptation of The French Lieutenant’s Woman
David Young, Graduate Student

In The Truth in Painting, Jacques Derrida posits the frame “breaks down and dislocates even as it cooperates in the production of the product, overflows it and is deduc(t)ed from it. It never lets itself be simply exposed,” in other words, the frame warps as it works (75). When discussing the cinematic framing devices Harold Pinter created in his adaptation of John Fowles’ The French Lieutenant’s Woman, it becomes important to question how the framing device of a film-within-a-film warps the viewer’s perception while at the same time enhancing the central story through an altered framing device. In this paper, I will explore how the cinematic version of The French Lieutenant’s Woman manipulates the narrative device of an obtrusive narrator via the crosscutting of two love stories, that while temporally different, work with one another to match the novel’s dual consciousness.

H.2 “Twentieth Century Liturgical Shifts: Anglican and Catholic”
Kristen Pungitore, Graduate Student

Liturgy is one of the best expressions of a group’s theology at a particular time and in a particular place. It represents how we understand God and how we respond to that understanding. This paper explores the similarities and parallels between Episcopalian liturgy in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer and Roman Catholic liturgy as presented in Vatican II’s document on the sacred liturgy, Sacrosanctum Concilium. Members of the Episcopal Standing Liturgical Commission and the Catholic bishops at Vatican II sought similar liturgical reforms because of shared influences, cultural shifts, and the results of Liturgical Movement; Both groups had commitments to return to early sources, to redefine liturgy as the work of the whole body of Christ, and to highlight the Pascal mystery as a central liturgical theme.

H.3 “The Association Between Bullying and Mental Illness”
Eli Schwersenski, Graduate Student

The current study sought to investigate the long term effects of bullying. Research has shown that bullying during childhood can lead to mental illness in adulthood. This study investigated the association between childhood bullying and adult mental illness, specifically depression. The study included five female participants between the ages of 24-40. The females volunteered to participate in the study and were interviewed on how they perceive the bullying they experienced during childhood, and how it has affected them in their adult lives. Results of the study indicated that childhood bullying does affect the lives of adults. However, it is unclear if childhood bullying leads to increased levels of depression as adults. The results of the study are inconclusive and require further investigation. This may be due to the small sample size, or because most of the participants were teachers. Further research is needed in order to fully investigate the long term effects of childhood bullying.

H.4 “A Deluxe Edition of Lincoln’s Works”
Dr. Charles Zarobila, Grasselli Library

This presentation is about a multivolume, fine press book called THE LIFE AND WORKS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1905). The book is in the Special Collections department at the Grasselli Library. The book was edited by John Nicolay and John Hay, Lincoln’s personal secretaries during the Civil War. The book is a wonderful example of the craftsmanship, planning, and materials that could go into making a deluxe edition of an author’s works at the turn of the 20th century. The history, construction, and artistic quality of the work will be discussed.

I. “The We the People Service-Learning Program”
Moderator: Liz Deegan, CSSA
Presenters: Kyle Hutnick, Ashley Aberl, Nick Santucci, and Alyssa Giannirakis, Undergraduates

The We the People Service-Learning Program includes three programs in which John Carroll tutors work with students in underserved area schools. In the 5th grade We the People program, teams of three or four tutors visit classrooms weekly to educate students about the US Constitution and citizenship. Students compete each spring in the Mock Congressional Hearing on JCU’s campus. Youth for Justice is pilot program in which 8th grade students identify an injustice in the community and, with the assistance of JCU tutors, research the issue, develop an action plan, and create a proposed solution to present to a panel of judges. Finally, in Project Citizen, JCU tutors work alongside tenth grade students to research an issue that they identify as a problem in their community and propose a policy change to civic leaders. Panels of JCU tutors will discuss the impact of the We the People Service Learning Program.

J. Honors Panel 2
Moderators: Dr. Maria Marsilli Cardozo and Dr. Julia Karolle-Berg

(J.1) Patrick Grogan: “Factors of Success: A Study of Select Ohio School Districts’ Achievement”

(J.2) William Butler: “The Effects of OTC Derivative Clearing Requirements on Monetary Policy Transmission Channels”

(J.3) Mary Benson: “The Efficacy of Excise Taxes in Reducing Cigarette Consumption”

(J.4) Danielle Brady: “Guided by the Light: The Work of Dante Alighieri and Michelangelo Buonarroti”

K. Arrupe Scholar Senior Capstone Panel 2
Panel Moderator: Dr. Margaret Finucane, CSSA
Presenters: Asurupi Gurung, Sadie Curtin, Dan Frac, Cedric Jackson, Undergraduates

L. “Contemporary Issues in Theology & Religious Studies”
Panel Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies

(L.1) “Sophia: A Challenge for Women’s Equality within the Catholic Church”
Sadie Curtin, Undergraduate

Challenging the predominantly masculine understanding of God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, this paper provides an alternative and feminist approach to the image of God through the study of Sophia/Wisdom. The paper identifies the struggles that women face as members of a patriarchal society whose structures directly contradict the message and mission of Jesus in the Gospels. Furthermore, it portrays the inequalities that women face today and argues that church tradition needs to be changed in order to be more in line with what Jesus actually intended so that Catholic women may have equal leadership in the Church.

(L.2) “Hope Theology in Relationship with the Legacy of St. Ignatius of Loyola: In the World, Out of the World, and Beyond the World”
Jillian Dunn, Undergraduate

This essay explores the “theology of hope” as it was developed by such influential twentieth-century theologians as Dorothee Sölle, Wolfhart Pannenberg, Johann Baptist Metz, and Karl Rahner, and draws correlations between these theological models and the life and work of St. Ignatius of Loyola. I evaluate these past developments in the Ignatian theology of hope with a view toward understanding how that vision of Christian hope is reflected in modern Catholic thought and practice. Building on the past fifty years of work using hope as the theological lens through which to view the ultimate ends of the Christian life, and bringing those recent developments into dialogue with the Ignatian tradition, I explore some of the practical and concrete differences that the Christian hope makes for life in the world today.

(L.3) “Politics and Ethics in the New English Translation of the Roman Missal”
Dónal McGinn Moorer, Undergraduate

This presentation critiques the process behind the creation of the 2011 English Translation of the Roman Missal to assess its level of compliance with the translation norms established by the Second Vatican Council and the organizational structure mandated by the Principle of Subsidiarity. I begin with an outline of the actual translation process drawing from such sources as Liturgiam Authenticam, the Congregation of Divine Worship’s document on liturgical translations. Then I compare that process to the translation norms outlined by Vatican II in Sancrosanctum Concilium. Finally, I evaluate the process in light of the Principle of Subsidiarity (as outlined by Quadragesimo Anno) to determine its moral standing. I conclude that the process for the New Translation of the Roman Missal was not only a violation of the norms established at the Second Vatican Council, but also a grave violation of the Church’s social-justice teaching on good governance.

(L.4) “The Case of Mara Salvatrucha: How the Catholic Church Is Helping to Prevent the Spread of Violence in El Salvador”
Jonathan Ruano, Undergraduate

Violence is a deep-seated element of human society, which poses problems on many levels and diverse ways, perhaps particularly with respect to terrorist and gang activity. This paper is to research one of the most violent gangs in the world, Mara Salvatrucha, also known as MS-13. Is this gang a terrorist group? Do they have a terrorist agenda? Do they have terrorist ties? What are their tactics? What are churches, in particular the Catholic Church, doing to help? These are some of the questions that this paper will discuss. I will argue that this gang is not a terrorist group and will also make the point that the Catholic Church, especially in El Salvador, has helped and is continuing to help prevent the spread of violence.

M. “Japanese Culture in a Time of Crisis”
Panel Moderator: Dr. Susan Long, Sociology & Criminology

(M.1) “Music and Poetry of Kizuna (Human Links): Rising from the Devastation of 3/11”
Keiko Nakano, Classical & Modern Languages & Cultures and East Asian Studies

The Great East Japan Earthquake struck the northeastern region Tohoku on March 11, 2011. This paper introduces two works of art which focus on kizuna (linking people). Both spring from the devastation and people’s struggles to overcome their misery and again live looking to tomorrow, keeping kizuna for each other. NHK published Hana wa Saku (Flowers are Blooming) in May, 2012. Singing for this piece are 33 singers, actors, actresses, and sports figures who come from the Tohoku region. The proceeds of the song go to the rehabilitation of the affected areas. The poet, Wago Ryoichi lives in Fukushima. Right after the earthquake, he began documenting his experiences in a powerful and poetic Twitter feed. His Twitter feed quickly earned over 14,000 followers. In May, 2011, his Twitter poetry was published under the title of Shi no Tsubute (Pebbles of Poetry).

(M.2) “Contemporary Views on Love and Romance Portrayed in Japanese Anime and Manga”
Bonnie Taylor, Undergraduate; Dr. Susan Long, Keiko Nakano and Dr. Roger Purdy, East Asian Studies

What is love? It is an elusive thing to define, yet it influences a huge part of human life and interaction and for many is a part of their philosophy and reason for being. The preoccupation with it and the accompanying baggage is universal; however, different countries have different cultural norms, and deal with love and its struggles in different ways. In Japan, I had the unique opportunity to explore Japanese views of love through anime and manga. This paper examines the ways the romantic troubles are portrayed in a sample of stories in these media and then using the results of T tests from a small scale survey I conducted, explores how well the approaches in manga and anime apply to real life.

(M.3) “The Manga to Anime Evolution”
Brionna Thomas, Undergraduate; Dr. Susan Long, Keiko Nakano and Dr. Roger Purdy, East Asian Studies

In researching the process of a manga to anime conversion it can be observed that the original source material of the manga can be tampered with or revised to varying degrees of extremes in the final product of the anime. To fully understand these changes and why they’re made, the average work process at Toei Animation was observed. The history of manga and the means by which it becomes a successful anime were also further analyzed at the Kyoto International Manga Museum. The compiled results showed that the manga’s development stage and the reception of both mediums by the fan base tend to have large impact on the process.

(M.4) “The Development of Anime’s Mecha Genre”
Daniel Gonzalez, Undergraduate; Dr. Susan Long, Keiko Nakano and Dr. Roger Purdy, East Asian Studies

A subcategory of the genre of science fiction, the category of “mecha” is mostly comprised of stories that deal with humanoid robots, or more commonly with giant robots that are operated by a human. Since its introduction around the mid-1900s, and with precursors going back to the 1950s with Osamu Tezuka’s Tetsuwan Atom (more commonly known as Astro Boy) the mecha genre shows a gradual evolution in Japanese animation. The focus of this thesis will be on the giant robot aspect of the mecha subgenre. The primary purpose is to illustrate and explain this gradual change in giant robot animation from its earliest roots to the genre’s more modern additions. The question is raised regarding whether it might be realistically possible for humans to construct actual versions of these mechas with future advancements in technology.

(M.5) “Faculty Reflection: What I Learned about Teaching and Research with JCU Students in Japan”
Dr. Jennifer M. McAndrew, History

This presentation will discuss how one faculty member was able to expand her teaching and research repertoire by accompanying a group of JCU students in Japan in the spring of 2012. It points to both what students can learn by studying with their professors abroad as well as how such experiences can be meaningful professional development opportunities for faculty members.

N.1 “Performing Gender in Law & Order: SVU and Ice Loves Coco
Ann Visintainer, Graduate Student

This paper explores the composite gender model generated by Ice-T’s current television projects, Law and Order: SVU and Ice Loves Coco. A paradigm that blends and bends traditional sex markers emerges from a consideration of the two shows side-by-side. In the public sphere, Ice-T’s masculinity conforms to gendered stereotypes, such as invulnerability, violence and emotional independence from women. Detective Tutuola is the proverbial street-savvy black cop whose attachment to a woman would only interfere with his work. Contrastingly, qualities such as verbal skill and emotional competency, traditionally coded as
feminine, characterize the masculinity of the private sphere. Ice-T guides Coco through conflict with her family, and publicly weeps as they renew their vows. This multidimensional manhood gestures towards both traditional and contemporary gender expectations in an attempt to successfully fulfill an emerging cultural vision of African-American male identity.

N.2 “Choice not Chance: Counselor Preparation and Involvement in Engaging Students and Their Families in Their Post High School Planning”
Dr. Nancy P. Taylor, Education & Allied Studies and Sharon Schwam, Graduate Student

Often, overwhelming tasks for students are thinking about and planning for life after high school. Individual factors including gender, race/ethnicity, along with external factors including family, friends and school may play a large role in influencing a student’s decisions about the future. This presentation will provide a research design to investigate how students engage in planning for life after high school and to identify those who struggle with envisioning a future. School counselors hold an important role in assisting high school students to plan for their future. After reviewing the literature on counselor preparation and current counseling interventions, a study will be conducted with a threefold objective. A survey will be created and administered to sophomores in the spring of 2013 in three local schools. An inclusive and socially just intervention will be designed and implemented. Participants’ results will be analyzed to determine the impact of the intervention.

N.3 “Raphael’s School of Athens: A Theorem in a Painting?”
Robert Haas, Alumnus

Raphael’s famous painting in the Vatican, The School of Athens, includes a geometer, presumably Euclid himself, demonstrating a construction to his fascinated students. But what theorem are they all studying? This talk first introduces the painting, and describes Raphael’s lifelong friendship with the eminent mathematician Paulus of Middelburg. It then presents several conjectured explanations, notably a theorem about a hexagram (Fichtner), or alternatively that the construction may be architecturally symbolic (Valtieri). The speaker finally offers his own “null hypothesis”: that the scene does not show any actual mathematics, but simply the fascination, excitement, and joy of mathematicians at their work. Thanks to Robert J. Kolesar, Professor of Mathematics at John Carroll University, and Jon L. Seydl, the Paul J. and Edith Ingalls Vignos, Jr., Curator of European Painting and Sculpture, 1500-1800, at the Cleveland Museum of Art, for comments and encouragement on the manuscript. Published July 2012 in Vol. 2 No. 2, pp. 2-26, of the online Journal of Humanistic Mathematics.

Thursday Sessions

O.1 “A Kind of Nothing: Visual and Linguistic Difference in Ralph Fiennes’ Coriolanus
Rachel Hoag, Graduate Student

In Ralph Fiennes’ film Coriolanus, the title character exhorts the rabble to “Get you home, you fragments” (1.1.194). But it is Coriolanus who is the fragment—incomplete and dwelling in a visual and linguistic no-man’s land. These spatial and linguistic middle grounds become areas where Coriolanus comes to be defined by his differences. Saussurean semiology dictates that the signifiers used to identify objects constitute a system of difference in which things are defined in relation to that which they are not. Coriolanus manipulates this system of difference—one where a Volscian is a Volscian because he is not a Roman—by placing Coriolanus in opposition to these “others” both visually and linguistically. My presentation explores the linguistic and visual modes that create the filmic world in which Coriolanus functions. This shifting nature of definition, both visual and linguistic, leads to a complicated Coriolanus who is consistently defined by that which he is not.

O.2 “Two Catholic Visions of the Teaching Vocation: Paulo Freire and the Second Vatican Council”
Meagen Farrell, Graduate Student; Dr. Edward Hahnenberg, Jack and Mary Jane Breen Chair in Catholic Systematic Theology

In the early 1960s, both Paulo Freire and the Second Vatican Council emerged on the world stage with transformative ideas and approaches rooted in Catholic practice and doctrine. Brazilian educator Paulo Freire led a successful mass literacy campaign that earned previously illiterate Brazilian the right to vote. His books articulated the difference between the “banking system of education” and liberation pedagogy. In Rome during the Second Vatican Council, bishops from around the world drafted documents that had profound effects on liturgy, social justice, and the approach of the Catholic Church to the modern world. Education was addressed in many of the Council documents. Both Freire and the council fathers wrote highly of the vocation of educators and challenged all Catholics to live out their vocations in solidarity with those who are oppressed. Analyzing the Council documents from a Freirean perspective illuminates some inconsistencies, with implications for Catholic theological education.

O.3 “Behavioral and cognitive rationales for frequent testing”
Dr. Abdulrazaq A. Imam, Psychology

People tend to procrastinate and delay inception and/or completion of tasks. Students would delay studying until examinations are so close the only option left is cramming. The procrastination scallop is a well-established behavioral phenomenon in both human and infra-human species. Distributed practice also has been demonstrated to be superior to massed practice in the cognitive literature. Frequent testing provides opportunities for distributed practice, creating mini-scallops, which fill the gap between acquisition and the big test. In various sections of three courses, standard pre-post testing was conducted at the start and end of the semester over many years. No weekly quizzes were required in one course compared to others for a few semesters. Mean assessment gains were bigger with than without weekly quizzes, indicating beneficial learning outcomes that suggest potential alternative strategies for faculty to implement low-cost effective instructional practices that students may benefit from.

(P.1) “Pink Lady”
Joan Petersen, Graduate Student

Parts read by the following undergraduates:

MOM is played by Julia Blanchard
DAD …by Elliott Woyshner
SHARON … by Liz Malloy

Pink Lady is a one-act play about Mom, a middle-aged woman who has found her voice and reasserted her free choice after almost thirty years as a wife and mother of five. Her decision to make changes in her life has a direct effect of both Sharon, her daughter, and her husband. When faced with an empty-nest home, Mom knew something had to change. A trip down memory lane was all the catalyst Mom needed to start making the necessary changes to re-establish her own identity. Through Mom’s assertion of self, Sharon sees Mom in a new light, realizing that Mom is not the ogre Sharon thought she was, but a person in her own rights with feelings and fears of her own. Dad, afraid of losing his authority and Sharon’s respect rebels when Mom starts rewriting his family rules.

(P.2) “The Children are Left Behind”
Brian Bayer, Undergraduate

This is a 21-minute informational/ educational documentary that focuses on the social issues surrounding immigration and the deportation of Latin American immigrants in the United States. There is a serious social issue that is being completely overlooked in the media coverage of this issue – how deportation affects
families that have established themselves in this country. When a parent is deported from the United States, but their child or children are allowed to stay, this causes an unfair amount of harm to an innocent child, as the child is left financially and emotionally orphaned.

Q. Rhetorical Dimensions of Persuasive Appeals – Four Criticisms
Panel Moderator: Dr. Brent Brossmann, Tim Russert Department of Communication & Theatre Arts

(Q.1) “Contradictions in Political Speeches – It’s More Complicated Than That”
Joshua Brossmann, Undergraduate

Paul Ryan’s Address to the Republican National Convention has been criticized for contradictory messages and reversals from previous positions. This analysis employs Kenneth Burke’s logology (a theory of language, or words about words) to identify how symbols and hierarchies function to create and preserve meaning. Particular emphasis is placed on Burke’s guilt-purification-redemption cycle to explain why different audiences reacted to the speech both positively and negatively. The text serves as an exemplar of how political speeches serve to perpetuate particular hierarchies.

(Q.2) “Dear Mr. President”: Persona as Protest Tool”
Barbie Curatolo, Undergraduate

The paper examines tension in Kenneth Burke’s writings about a symbolic/nonsymbolic binary with respect to language and music. These tensions are explored and used as a method to explore P!nk’s development of a distinct persona for her critique of President George W. Bush’s war policies and his response to Hurricane Katrina. The paper concludes that the combination of persona, lyrics, musical tone and imagery combine to offer a particularly compelling use of popular music as a political critique of a standing President.

(Q.3) “Analyzing George Carlin’s ‘Religion Is Bull****’ Routine Using the Narrative Paradigm”
Erica Raab, Undergraduate

Walter Fisher’s Narrative Paradigm breaks with the assumption of human rationality to argue that humans have an innate sense of “good reasons” they use to assess the persuasiveness of appeals. Central to that narrative rationality are the concepts of narrative fidelity and narrative probability. The paper uses Fisher’s perspectives to explain both positive and negative reactions to a very controversial comedy routine of George Carlin’s. The nature of Carlin’s logic, support, and comedic implications are explored.

(Q.4) “Queen Elizabeth I’s Speech to the Troops at Tilbury: A Feminine Voice in a Masculine World”
Leah Tremaglio, Undergraduate

Politically moderate and wholeheartedly dedicated to her people, Elizabeth I represents an ideal image of a strong woman who battled expectations and stereotypes to present England as a unified power in the 16th century and beyond. Taught political, religious and linguistic skills typically reserved for males, Elizabeth used her knowledge to assert herself as the legitimate Queen of England. To capture the greatness of her reign and the influence of her techniques, a rhetorical analysis of her Speech to the Troops at Tilbury is employed to discover how the speech acts as a reflection of her successful ability to redefine the realms in which women could dominate with respect to contexts of politics, culture, and gender- based expectations.

R. “Challenges of Student Veterans at JCU: New Best Practices”
Moderators: Krysta Kurzynski, Career Services and Lt. Col. (Retired) Eric Patterson, Admission
Presenters: student veterans attending JCU

As the population of student veterans increases at JCU, all members of the campus community need to be aware of the unique and challenging hurdles faced by veterans as they transition into the academic and professional worlds outside of the military culture. Where are they coming from? What are the challenges they face as students? What are their needs, and what are we doing at JCU to meet these? And most importantly, what can you do to assist in making their transition a smooth one so they continue on their educational path at JCU? We will discuss the answers and offer suggestions assisted by a panel of current JCU student veterans, reflecting on their experiences.

S. Arrupe Scholar Senior Capstone Panel 3
Panel Moderator: Dr. Margaret Finucane, CSSA
Presenters: Samantha Hoch, Jillian Dunn, Matt Lowe, Lauren Gunderman, Undergraduates

Holocaust Remembrance Day Events
Monday, April 8, 2013
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

1:30-2:00 PM
Memorial Ceremony
Led by David Markovich, Founding President
Hillel at John Carroll University

2:00-3:30 PM
Presentation
“Am I My Neighbor’s Keeper? Dynamics of Moral Courage for Holocaust Rescuers”
Fern Ruth Levy, M.S., M.A.J.S.
Director and Founder of the Anne Frank Moral Courage Project of Cleveland

What motivated people to shift from being bystanders to becoming actively engaged in rescuing victims of the Holocaust? Learn about research on the bystander phenomenon and stories of Christian and Muslim Holocaust rescuers. What factors prompted them to intervene? Why did such people become the “Righteous among the Nations”? What can we learn from their stories to prevent future genocide? Honor Yom HaShoah and join in affirming the commitment: Never again.

Sponsored by
The Department of Theology and Religious Studies
The Louis E. and Marcia M. Emsheimer Charitable Trust Philanthropic Fund
Hillel at John Carroll University
The Tuohy Chair for Inter-Religious Studies
The Center for Service and Social Action
The Department of Sociology & Criminology
The Department of Psychology
The Program in Applied Ethics
The Institute of Catholic Studies
The Office of Campus Ministry
The Bediüzzaman Said Nursi Chair in Islamic Studies

These opening events of the week-long Celebration of Scholarship are free and open to the public.

Schedule

Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday

Monday, April 8, 2013

All Week: Celebrate the Art Exhibit
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery

MON 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Major Fellowships for Students
Dolan Science Center, A202/203
Moderators: Dr. Julia Karolle-Berg and Dr. Lauren Bowen
Lunch and discussion of major fellowship opportunities for students such as the Fulbright, Marshall, and Rhodes.
By Invitation Only

MON 1:30-3:30 p.m. Holocaust Remembrance Day Events
1:30-2:00 p.m. Memorial Ceremony
Led by David Markovich, Founding President
Hillel at John Carroll University
2:00-3:30 p.m. Presentation
“Am I My Neighbor’s Keeper? Dynamics of Moral Courage for Holocaust Rescuers”
Fern Ruth Levy, M.S., M.A.J.S.
Director and Founder of the Anne Frank Moral Courage Project of Cleveland
Sponsored by the Department of Theology & Religious Studies and others
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

MON 3:30-5 p.m. Faculty Research Reception
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
By Invitation Only

5:00-6:00 p.m. Book Signing by Marian Morton
Professor Emerita Dr. Morton will be signing copies of her latest book “John Carroll University (The Campus History).”
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room

MON 6-7 p.m. Opening Reception for Participants
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
By Invitation Only

MON 6:30-8 p.m. Poster Session
Dolan Science Center, Muldoon Atrium
Refreshments

Line
Tuesday, April 9, 2013

All Week: Celebrate the Art Exhibit
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery

TUE 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session A
PANEL: Arrupe Scholar Senior Capstone 1
Moderator: Dr. Margaret Finucane
Presenters: Sean Whalen, Maria Simone, Cadia Wiley, Esther D’Mello
Dolan Science Center, A202

TUE 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session B
Individual Presentations
Moderator: Dr. Cynthia Marco Scanlon, Center for Career Services
Dolan Science Center, A203
(1) Lark Moore & Brittany Webb: “The Null Curriculum and the US Eugenics Movement: The Under Education of America”
(2) Carson Bay: “The Lion of the Apocalypse — Messiah Fierce and Wild”
(3) Maria Soriano: “When WAC Becomes TAC: The Shifting Roles of FYC Classrooms and Instructors”

TUE 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session C
WORKSHOP: The New Classroom: Effective Teaching Strategies for the Interfaith and Intergenerational Classroom
Presenter: Wanda Scott, Theology & Religious Studies
Dolan Science Center, A202

TUE 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session D
Individual Presentations
Moderator: Dr. Paul Lauritzen, Theology & Religious Studies
Dolan Science Center, A203
(1) David Markovich: “Older Jews in the Soviet Union: Oral Histories”
(2) Jurell Sison: “The Development of Doctrine and the Debate Surrounding the Declaration on Religious Freedom”
(3) James Menkhaus: “Can Solidarity Exist?”

TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session E
PANEL: ASIA Youth Program Evaluation Project
Moderator: Dr. Penny Harris, Sociology & Criminology
Dolan Science Center, E241 [NOTE ROOM CHANGE]
Presenters: Emiliie Wyszynski, David Markovich, Alex Stultz, Shannon Doyle, Molly Wilson, Tara Knight, Dan Merhar, Ro Drain, Ellen Day,Sephora Fadiga ,Gina Groeschen, Ali Link, Lauren Penkala, John Tash, Dontez White, Elizabeth Tilley, Jennylee Gandarilla, and Jessica Wagner

TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session F
PANEL: “We the People” Service Learning Program Part 1
Moderator: Liz Deegan, CSSA
Dolan Science Center, W220 [NOTE ROOM CHANGE]
Presenters: John Jackson, Curtis Walker, Rob Law, Bridget Mason

TUE 6:30 p.m. Mitsui Distinguished Lectureship
Featuring Brantly Womack
CK Yen Chair, The Miller Center of Public Affairs
Professor of Foreign Affairs, Department of Politics
University of Virginia
Sponsored by East Asian Studies
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

TUE 7:30 p.m. The Tuohy Lecture Series
“The (Second) Coming: Messiahs, Jesus and the Mahdi”
Featuring David L. Barr, Ph.D.
Sponsored by the Department of Theology & Religious Studies
Dolan Science Center, A202/203 [NOTE ROOM CHANGE]

Line

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

All Week: Celebrate the Art Exhibit
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery

WED 12-1 p.m. Scholarly Lunch
Presented by the Center for Faculty Development
RSVP Required

Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
Yi Shang, Department of Education & Allied Studies
“The Evolution of Achievement Gaps among Elementary, Middle, and High School Students 1982 – 2008”

WED 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session G
Honors Panel 1
Moderators: Dr. Maria Marsilli Cardozo and Dr. Julia Karolle-Berg
Dolan Science Center, A202
Presenters:
(1) Yaritbel Torres Mendoza: “Differences in alkaloid defenses in the poison frog Oophaga pumilio between disturbed and undisturbed habitats of Bocas del Toro, Panama.”
(2) Gabrielle Ruchames: “Une Beauté Noire: L’ambigu chez l’Hélène de Jean Giraudoux.”
(3) Darcy Egan: “Is Chivalry Really Dead? – An Exploration of Chivalry and Masculinity in Medieval and American Literature.”
(4) Sarah Castellano: “An Investigation of the Role of Distinctiveness on the Production Effect”

WED 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session H
Individual Presentations
Moderator: Dr. Joe Kelly, Theology & Religious Studies
Dolan Science Center, A203
(1) David Young: “Framing the Unfilmable: Harold Pinter’s Adaptation of The French Lieutenant’s Woman
(2) Kristen Pungitore: “Twentieth Century Liturgical Shifts: Anglican and Catholic”
(3) Eli Schwersenski: “The Association between Bullying and Mental Illness”
(4) Dr. Charles Zarobila: “A Deluxe Edition of Lincoln’s Works”

WED 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session I
PANEL: “We the People” Service Learning Program” Part 2

Moderator: Liz Deegan, CSSA
Dolan Science Center, E227 [NOTE ROOM CHANGE]
Presenters: Kyle Hutnick, Ashley Aberl, Nick Santucci, Alyssa Giannirakis

WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session J
Honors Panel 2
Moderators: Dr. Maria Marsilli Cardozo and Dr. Julia Karolle-Berg
Dolan Science Center, A202
Presenters:
(1) Patrick Grogan: “Factors of Success: A Study of Select Ohio School Districts’ Achievement”
(2) William Buttler: “The Effects of OTC Derivative Clearing Requirements on Monetary Policy Transmission Channels”
(3) Mary Benson: “The Efficacy of Excise Taxes in Reducing Cigarette Consumption”
(4) Danielle Brady: “Guided by the Light: The Work of Dante Alighieri and Michelangelo Buonarroti”

WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session K
PANEL: Arrupe Scholar Senior Captstone 2
Moderator: Dr. Margaret Finucane, CSSA
Dolan Science Center, A203
Presenters: Asurupi Gurung, Sadie Curtin, Dan Frac, Cedric Jackson

WED 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session L
PANEL: Contemporary Issues in Theology & Religious Studies
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies
Dolan Science Center, A202
(1) Sadie Curtin: “Sophia: A Challenge for Women’s Equality within the Catholic Church”
(2) Jillian Dunn: “Hope Theology in Relationship with the Legacy of St. Ignatius of Loyola: In the World, Out of the World, and Beyond the World”
(3) Dónal McGinn Moorer: “Politics and Ethics in the New English Translation of the Roman Missal”
(4) Jonathan Ruano: “The Case of Mara Salvatrucha: How the Catholic Church Is Helping to Prevent the Spread of Violence in El Salvador”

WED 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session M
PANEL: Japanese Culture in a Time of Crisis
Moderator: Dr. Susan Long, Sociology & Criminology
Dolan Science Center, A203
Presenters:
(1) Keiko Nakano: “Music and Poetry of Kizuna (Human Links): Rising from the Devastation of 3/11”
(2) Bonnie Taylor: “Contemporary Views on Love and Romance Portrayed in Japanese Anime and Manga”
(3) Brionna Thomas: “The Manga to Anime Evolution”
(4) Daniel Gonzalez: “The Development of Anime’s Mecha Genre”
(5) Dr. Jennifer McAndrew: “Faculty Reflection: What I Learned about Teaching and Research with JCU Students in Japan”

WED 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session N
Individual Presentations
Moderator: Dr. Mark Storz, Associate Dean, CAS Graduate Studies
Dolan Science Center, E227 [NOTE ROOM CHANGE]
(1) Ann Visintainer: “Performing Gender in Law & Order: SVU and Ice Loves Coco
(2) Dr. Nancy Taylor and Sharon Schwam: “Choice not Chance: Counselor Preparation and Involvement in Engaging Students and Their Families in Their Post High School Planning”
(3) Robert Haas: “Raphael’s School of Athens: A Theorem in a Painting?”

WED 5-7:30 p.m. Special Event
“Crisis Mapping Training Session”
Presenter: Dr. Jen Ziemke, Political Science
Dolan Science Center, E240
Open to the JCU Community. Registration Required

WED 7:00 p.m. Applied Ethics Lecture
“Who is Watching Us Online and Should They Stop?”
Featuring: Kirsten Martin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Strategic Management & Public Policy
George Washington University
Sponsored by the Program in Applied Ethics
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

WED 9-11 p.m. The Arts at Night
Lombardo Student Center, The Underground
Refreshments

Line

Thursday, April 11, 2013

All Week: Celebrate the Art Exhibit
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery

THU 12-1 p.m. Scholarly Lunch
Presented by the Center for Faculty Development
RSVP Required

Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
(1) Dr. Mariana Ortega, Philosophy: “The Question of Identity and the Multiplicitous Self”
(2) Dr. Megan Thornton, Classical & Modern Languages & Cultures: “Epigraphs and Intertextuality in the Poetry of Exiled Cuban Writer Zoe Valdes”

THU 1-2 p.m. Artist Reception
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery
Refreshments

THU 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session O
Individual Presentations
Moderator: Dr. James Krukones, Associate Academic Vice President
Dolan Science Center, A202
(1) Rachel Hoag: “A Kind of Nothing: Visual and Linguistic Difference in Ralph Fiennes’ Coriolanus
(2) Meagan Farrell: “Two Catholic Visions of the Teaching Vocation: Paulo Freire and the Second Vatican Council”
(3) Dr. Abdulrazaq Imam: “Behavioural and Cognitive Rationales for Frequent Testing”

THU 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session P
Individual Presentations
Moderator: Dr. Brenda Wirkus, Philosophy and the Humanities Program
Dolan Science Center, A203
(1) Joan Petersen: One-act play “Pink Lady” presented by Julia Blanchard, Liz Malloy and Elliott Woyshner
(2) Brian Bayer: “The Children are Left Behind”

THU 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session Q
PANEL: Rhetorical Dimensions of Persuasive Appeals – Four Criticisms
Moderator: Dr. Brent Brossmann, Tim Russert Department of Communication & Theatre Arts
Dolan Science Center, A202
Presenters:
(1) Joshua Brossmann: “Contradictions in Political Speeches – It’s More Complicated Than That”
(2) Barbie Curatolo: “Dear Mr. President”: Persona as Protest Tool”
(3) Erica Raab: “Analyzing George Carlin’s ‘Religion Is Bull****’ Routine Using the Narrative Paradigm”
(4) Leah Tremaglio:”Queen Elizabeth I’s Speech to the Troops At Tilbury: A Feminine Voice in a Masculine World”

THU 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session R
PANEL: “Challenges of Student Veterans at JCU: New Best Practices”
Moderators: Krysta Kurzynski, Career Services and Lt. Col. (Retired) Eric Patterson, Enrollment Services
Dolan Science Center, A203

THU 3:30-4:30 p.m. Special Event
“Crowd-Funding Student Scholarship. Example Project: How Women Became Priests in Ireland”
Meagen Farrell
Administration Building AD225 [NOTE NEW LOCATION]

THU 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session S
PANEL: Arrupe Scholar Senior Capstone 3
Moderator: Dr. Margaret Finucane, CSSA
Dolan Science Center, A202
Presenters: Samantha Hoch, Jillian Dunn, Matt Lowe, Lauren Gunderman

THU 5 p.m. Speaker Event
“College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be”
Featuring Andrew Delbanco
Mendelson Family Chair of American Studies and
Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities
Columbia University
Sponsored by the Provost and Academic Vice President’s Office
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium