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The majority of events will be held in the Dolan Center for Science and Technology. See the schedule below for details on event locations. This schedule is subject to change; check back frequently for updates.

Tuesday Sessions | Wednesday Sessions | Thursday Sessions

PANEL: TRS Student Panel: Engaging Contemporary Issues
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies
TUE 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session Dolan Science Center, A203

(1) Is Homosexuality an Abomination?
Michael Younes, Undergraduate
This paper explores the relationship between homosexuality and the Hebrew Bible. I analyze the main “texts of terror” which many believers regard as opposing homosexuality. I then juxtapose the Biblical texts to the cultures that surrounded the biblical world, e.g. Egypt and Babylon. Using Biblical material, primary source documents from Josephus and Origen, along side texts from the Levantine cultures, I seek to find out what the scriptures say and why they say what they do.

(2) When Digital Culture Transforms the Process of Church Teaching: Solidarity in an Age of Digital Immediacy
John Barrett, Undergraduate
I address how Catholic Church teaching is mediated within the contemporary culture landscape – through digital communication technology. No longer limited to the traditional genres of church teaching such as allocutions, apostolic exhortations, and encyclicals, papal statements can now be disseminated and interpreted through digital venues. When the pope utilizes digital communication, he contributes to the reality of a broader cultural dynamic – namely, “digital immediacy.” On the one hand, digital immediacy seems to be beneficial since it allows the laity to access ecclesial information quickly and easily. On the other hand, digital immediacy transforms the Catholic Church’s ability to teach I suggest that the challenge is not insurmountable, but that it requires the church to employ methods that embed church teaching within the broader Catholic tradition and encourage popular agency among the laity. I explore how a university’s campus ministry program might actualize this requirement.

(3) The Colossians Household Code and a Hermeneutic of Hunger: Reading Colossians 3:18–4:1 from a Contemporary Experience of Sexual Oppression
Matthew Michels, Undergraduate
Interpretation of biblical texts is not a neutral enterprise: the interpreter is always implicated in her hermeneutic. My paper self consciously takes up a hermeneutic of hunger to address the “christianized” Greco Roman household code contained in Colossians 3:18–4:1. The historical context for the inclusion of this passage in this deutero Pauline letter reveals an authorial strategy to adapt the faith of the fledgling Christian community to the standards of Greco Roman patriarchy. At the same time, a “gospel dynamism” characterizes this letter, as the author chooses to include a modified form of the baptismal equality formula seen in Paul’s letter to the Galatians. The paper takes this gospel dynamism as a breach in the logic that led to adaptation of the household code and from this proceeds to recommendations for engaging contemporary manifestations of oppression of the queer community.

(4) Liberia, Ebola, and a Hermeneutic of Hunger: Mark 12:38-44 as a Model for the Reasonable Expectation of Support
Joy Parker, Undergraduate
Mark 12:38-44 has traditionally been read as a pericope about sacrificial giving. But contemporary interpretation suggests two important correctives: first, there may be a multiplicity of valuable – though not equal – meanings; and second, attention must be paid to individuals – namely the widow – who remain voiceless in the story. This paper will discuss the recent Ebola crisis in West Africa and assert that the absence of meaningful response to this crisis was – and is – symptomatic of a larger attitude toward Black Africa. A history of exploitative and negligent policies in Liberia will be established as a case study undergirding this argument. Then the short passage from Mark will be examined against this backdrop for principles that might illumine discussion around what constitutes a humane response to tragedy. These two threads will be woven together and a proposal issued around ways individuals, small communities and larger organizations can – and should – respond to such a crisis.

PANEL A: Individual Papers 1/2
Moderator:
Dr. Cynthia Marco Scanlon, Center for Career Services
TUE 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

(A.1) How are Institutions of Higher Education Implementing Transition Courses for Student Veterans? A Pilot Study
Rebecca McMenamin, Graduate Student
To better support first-year student veterans in their transition from the military to college life, current literature recommends the use of a transition course (DeSawal, 2013; Livingston & Bauman, 2013; Mikelson & Saunders, 2013; Vacchi, 2014). However, it does not offer empirical research on how institutions are implementing this intervention and if this tool is indeed effective at increasing retention and persistence toward graduation. In this pilot study, five institutions of various size and locations were surveyed to discover common themes related to their courses’ structure, objectives, assignments, and assessment practices. More advanced courses were found to progressively deviate from the traditional first-year seminar model and include content areas specific to veterans’ needs such as translating military experience and vocational discernment/development.

(A.2) Wallace Stevens’s Salvaging
Robert Haas, alumnus
How could Wallace Stevens be simultaneously a major 20th century poet and a highly successful businessman? Many commentators simply ignore any possible conflict between the two roles. But Stevens himself, in an essay describing his work as an insurance lawyer – vice-president of the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company, explained how he felt it was an essential part of his job to try to salvage contracts that the company’s clients, after having gone bankrupt, could no longer fulfill. This talk suggests that a similar altruistic impulse motivated Stevens’s early poetry that tried, through beauty, to salvage his era’s widespread loss of religious faith. ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes, and Reviews 27(4)(2014)182-188.

(A.3) Failing the Fagan Cognition Test
Robert Haas, alumnus
Long-time CWRU psychology professor Dr. Joseph F. Fagan III’s ingenious language-free intelligence test assesses a baby’s memory and curiosity simply by observing whether it stares longer at the unfamiliar one in a pair of pictures. In principle the test could work for adults too, e.g. for senility testing. But an adult, unlike a baby, knows he is being tested. The speaker will present his scenario how anxiety and an attempt to beat the test might then directly cause the subject to fail it. The Mathematical Intelligencer 37(1)(2015)62-63.

PANEL B: Arrupe Panel 1/3
Moderator:
Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Scholars Program
TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

PANEL C: Individual Papers 2/2
Moderator:TBA
TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

(C.1) The French or the American care taker (nursing) programs
Nickencia Weaver, Undergraduate

(C.2) Failing the Fagan Cognition Test

Robert Haas, alumnus
Long-time CWRU psychology professor Dr. Joseph F. Fagan III’s ingenious language-free intelligence test assesses a baby’s memory and curiosity simply by observing whether it stares longer at the unfamiliar one in a pair of pictures. In principle the test could work for adults too, e.g. for senility testing. But an adult, unlike a baby, knows he is being tested. The speaker will present his scenario how anxiety and an attempt to beat the test might then directly cause the subject to fail it. The Mathematical Intelligencer (2015, in press). See Panel A above.

PANEL D: Rape Narratives and the Rhetoric of Sexual Violence
Moderator: Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, Reading Room

This panel will explore the rhetoric of rape and examine how rape narratives in literature perpetuate misconceptions about the nature of the crime and the circumstances under which it is committed. We will focus on the problems that come from misunderstanding consent, incorrect definitions of crimes, and how to best support survivors. The panel will also explore the problems of sexual violence specific to college campuses and John Carroll. The goal of the panel will be to gain a greater understanding of the issue of rape in literature and in popular media to reach conclusions about how to work towards a society in which a more realistic, comprehensive discussion of rape and sexual consent leads to more support for survivors of rape and less instances of rape. Open discussions of these difficult concepts are important for preventing future crimes and for helping survivors come forward with their stories.

(D.1) Rape, Non-consensual Sex, and Sexual Assault: What is the Difference
Jennifer Vrobel, Undergraduate; Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
There can be difficulty applying words to complicated situations because there is ambiguity between the word and its definition. An example of this is rape. Rape is the “penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without consent of the victim…” (Basu, 2012). This paper discusses that the misconceptions of the rape and its definition continue in modern culture within universities and colleges because there was not a clear definition of rape until 2012, there are different words that are used to replace rape that are employed by different institutions, and colleges and universities, including John Carroll University, establish those different words within their interpersonal relationship policies.

(D.2) Consent: Defining the Undefinable
Michael Gong, Undergraduate; Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
This analysis of consent and its definition shows how it is nearly impossible to come up with a universally understandable and acceptable standard of consent. From the rhetorical analysis, it is evident that specific word and phrase choice can strongly affect the definition of consent. A main point from the comparison section (comparing the John Carroll University Interpersonal Violence Policy with the Xavier University Student Handbook) is how similarities in definitions can help to give them each legitimacy but also take away from the ability to clear up uncertainty. The point of including a case study was to show how rulings on consent can and must vary on a case by case basis and are dependent on personal testimonies. Finally, the addition of alcohol and other drugs can completely take away the credibility of any form of consent. There are countless factors that have serious implications on the variety of interpretations of consent, and this is an issue that will have to be continually addressed.

(D.3) The Rape Epidemic on College Campuses
William Cameron, Undergraduate; Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
Twenty five percent of college students will be raped during their four years of undergraduate studies. Several victims will not even know it. In a social scene built upon empty bottles and beer cans, the lines between right and wrong can appear blurred. Differentiating between a regrettable hook-up and experiencing rape can be a confusing task. Despite the knowledge of a university rape culture, many college administrations make inadequate efforts to educate about rape, then prevent, and punish the crime. A survey conducted at John Carroll University put this deficiency on display as students incorrectly defined rape and how to report it. Additionally, many students identified scenarios involving rape as “not rape”. This paper explores the rape culture of universities and attempts to provide a solution to the crisis.

(D.4) Moving Survivor Discourse into the Dominant Discourse
Erin Kelley, Graduate; Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
In this paper, I examine texts of various survivors that are aimed at several specific audiences. I explore the problems survivors encounter when telling their narratives across genres to distinctly different audiences to argue that by focusing on validating and supporting rather than challenging the reality of survivors, audiences can shape their reactions to trauma to support recovery of individual survivors. The central texts are Alice Sebold’s Lucky, Dylan Farrow’s Open Letter against Woody Allen, and the online community Self-Care After Rape. I compare instances where these survivors are challenged to times where they were supported. The paper concludes that by including survivors back into communities their trauma excludes them from and excluding perpetrators who do not understand or admit the faults in their actions, we can fight rape culture and move towards a world without sexual violence.


PANEL E: Violence and Virginity in Medieval Narratives
Moderator: Dr. Emily Butler, English
WED 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

In this panel, we explore both the limitations on medieval women and the ways that they exploited these limitations to claim their own agency. Whether physically or within texts, women faced threats of violence and denigrations of their authorial or personal identities. Nevertheless, we do a disservice to these women and to the cultures of the Middle Ages if we assume that the period simply lacked in assertive, challenging narratives from and about women. The papers in this panel highlight the complications in this nexus of challenging narratives, from saints’ lives to secular fables. We will also demonstrate how these medieval texts raise questions about our own contemporary understanding of gender and social norms.

(E.1) The Destructive Properties of Virginity in Medieval Religious Texts​
Sean Kirby, Graduate Student
In medieval literature, determining whether or not a woman was a virgin allowed society to pass judgment on that woman’s morality. If a woman was not a virgin, she was deemed “unpure”—even if she acted in a manner that would please the Lord. Conversely, society also condemned virgin women for being susceptible to sin. So, it did not truly matter if a woman was a virgin or not—she was condemned instead for having a body that could be penetrated and polluted. In conclusion, I intend to argue that the ideals associated with virginity strongly encourage religious women to devalue their physical bodies—the very thing that makes them feminine—to better emulate Christ, which is a nearly impossible task.

(E.2) She Bore Me to Humankind’​: Birthing a New Model for Medieval Mothers in the Hagiographies of Transvestite Saints
Katie Ours, Graduate Student
In this paper, I argue the hagiographies, Life of Saint Euphrosyne and the Life of Saint Eugenia, featured in Ælfric’s work, Lives of Saints, provide a dynamic model of motherhood – at times both subversive and compliant to medieval gender norms – for a Christian wife and mother to adopt. To argue this point, I discuss the similarities and differences associated with male and female saint stories in regards to the virtue of virginity. I outline various critical interpretations of these hagiographies in order to suggest an absence concerning the presence of motherhood; these critics often focus on the patriarchal lineage and the masculine language. Building on this background, I examine these texts to analyze each mother’s role in helping her respective daughter reach sainthood; and while these mothers gain access to heaven, they still are not afforded the agency to become a saint even though they maintain their spiritual virginity.

(E.3) Making Contact: Reading Marie de France’s Violent Language in the Lais
Darcy Egan, Graduate Student
Building on an admittedly limited foundation of Marie de France’s biographical identity, I will examine her declared authorial intent to rescue the lais from obscurity and transpose aventure, or physical experience, to writing. Then, I will complicate the discussion by analyzing her rhetorical use of violence, tracing various scenes of bodily harm and cruelty throughout the lais. For many, these critical threads of authorship and violence might seem entirely unrelated, but I contend that these two discussions are actually quite complementary. I argue that Marie de France raises the stakes in the discussion of authorial intent, pinning down words, but also making language physical and dangerous. Within the lais, reading is not an isolated task, but a dynamic and demanding relationship between reader and writer, as Marie de France constructs the act of interpretation as a violent assault on her physical body.


PANEL F: Honors Panel 1/5
Moderator: Dr. Colin Swearingen, Political Science
WED 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, Reading Room

(F.1) Cigarette Tax and its Affect on Smoking Behavior
Calli Hudock, Undergraduate Student
According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, a 10% increase in cigarette prices can reduce consumption by 3-5%. This paper uses regression analysis to examine the effects of state excise taxes, the absence of healthcare coverage, alcohol consumption, unemployment, education and age on the percentage of current smokers. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of excise taxes in combating smoking behavior across all 50 states given cigarettes’ relatively inelastic demand and highly addictive quality.
Senior Honors Project

(F.2) Impact Analysis of Improved Hydrokinetic Project Regulations
Joseph McHugh, Undergraduate Student
The United States relies mainly on fossil fuels to meet its energy demand, but it is beginning to look into renewable energy alternatives. One such alternative is hydrokinetic technology, which captures the kinetic energy found in waves, tides and currents. Although initially hampered by regulatory uncertainty and low government backing, hydrokinetic technology is now gaining traction within the United States. Improved regulations and government laws are promoting research and development in the field, which will lead to more projects. This paper performs an impact analysis of an increased number of hydrokinetic energy projects as a result of reduced regulatory uncertainty and increased government backing, focusing on the impacts on the environment and the economy.
Senior Honors Project

(F.3) The Greenhouse Effect: What is the Relationship between Media Attention and Supreme Court Law Clerk Diversity?
Alexis Mittereder, Undergraduate Student
Previous research shows that Supreme Court Justices are attentive of media coverage by elite news sources and their decision making process may be influenced by their desire for favorable press coverage. This theory, called the Greenhouse Effect after Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Linda Greenhouse, suggests that the Court is not insulated from popular opinion, but that public opinion influences Justices’ decision making process. This study aims to investigate whether this attention to public opinion by way of media coverage impacts other court processes, namely law clerk selection. More specifically, it explores the power of media attention in relation to diversity of the Court law clerk cohort. If research shows that a rise in clerk diversity follows an increase in media attention on clerk diversity, a case can be made that the Supreme Court is cognizant of media attention and is not insulated from the opinions of elite media sources.
Senior Honors Project

PANEL G: Explorations of the Social Condition
Moderator: Dr. Gloria Vaquera, Sociology & Criminology
WED 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

(G.1) Food, Ethnicity and Identity: An Exploration of Italian Identity”
Kenneth Farona, Undergraduate; Dr. Susan Long, Sociology and Criminology
My goal is to explore the relationship between food and culture in Italian identity from an anthropological perspective. By analyzing culinary traditions as well as historical agriculture systems, I hope to demonstrate why Italian identity and culture is so much defined by food. Using essential texts and films that explore what it means to be “Italian” I seek to provide an understanding of food’s primary role in the creation of culture and its importance to Italian culture. Preliminary findings will be presented.

(G.2) Church as a Site of Social Capital Acquisition for Immigrants
Jose “Alex” Esparza, Undergraduate; Dr. Gloria Vaquera, Sociology and Criminology
Understanding the immigrant experience and how communities adapt to new cultures has interested social science researchers for decades. This paper focuses on understanding the role of church communities in assisting new immigrants adapt to life in the United States. This paper reviews research focusing on various immigrant communities stretching from the East coast to the West coast. Research suggests that the church participation assists new immigrant in forming a new sense of community and building social networks that are beneficial in securing employment, housing and basic necessities.

(G.3) Low-Income Students and the College Experience
Brittany Thompson, Undergraduate; Dr. Phyllis Harris, Sociology and Criminology
Throughout history, education has been thought of as an equalizer in terms of social class and mobility. However, research has repeatedly revealed that the education system simply reproduces existing inequalities. This study involved exploring the experiences of four students, self identified as coming from lower economic backgrounds, whom are currently attending John Carroll University or who have recently graduated. This study focused on barriers to success that ranged from marginalization to the stress of managing work and academics. When analyzing the interviews, it is clear that these individuals faced adversity and hardship not typically experienced by their peers of higher economic status. The overwhelming question is what can be done to better meet the needs of students from lower economic backgrounds? These students believed that things like support services, student advocacy, mentorship from faculty, and a larger minority presence could set low-income students up to succeed at John Carroll University.

(G.4) Body Image Perceptions and Disorders among College Men: The Influences of Identity
Taylor Hartman, Undergraduate; Dr. Medora Barnes, Sociology and Criminology
Body image problems and eating disorders were once thought of “women’s only” disorders, yet men suffer too from these problems. Over the last few decades, the increased emphasis by the media and on men being muscular and fit, and changing cultural body norms have encouraged men to be more conscious of their appearance and led to a rise in male eating disorders. Due to cultural standards of masculinity, men may have negative attitudes toward seeking psychological help and treatment for issues related to body dysmorphic or eating disorders. In this study, I use face-to-face interviews with college men to explore the ways in which the men’s interlocking identities (gender, race, class, sexuality, age, etc.) influence their perceptions of body image and their embodied experiences.


PANEL H: Arrupe Panel 2/3
Moderator: Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Scholars Program
WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

PANEL I: Honors Panel 2/5
Moderator: Dr. Colin Swearingen, Political Science
WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

(I.1) A Compassion That Can Stand in Awe: Exploring and Addressing Homelessness through Sociological Analyses, Narratives, and Theological Responses
Keri Grove, Undergraduate Student; Faculty Advisors: Dr. Metres, Dr. Clark
Scholars generally present two theories about homelessness— that homelessness is caused by personal flaws and personal poor choices, and that homelessness is caused by structural factors. In reality, these theories intertwine; homelessness is caused by a combination of personal fault and societal injustice. Regardless of the cause of homelessness, however, all homeless people have dignity and should be treated as so. This project analyses the causes of homelessness, shares the stories of many of the homeless I have met through the John Carroll Labre Project, and uses Catholic Social Teaching to argue that Catholics are called to engage in social justice and solidarity to work to end homelessness.
Senior Honors Project

(I.2) An Economic Examination of the Re-Structured Education System in New Orleans Ten Years after Hurricane Katrina
Brianna Lazarchik, Undergraduate Student
Senior Honors Project

(I.3) Utilizing ADHD Methods to Support Low Performing Classrooms
Elizabeth Malloy, Undergraduate; Dr. Thomas Kelly, Education and School Psychology
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) impacts one in ten students. Students with ADHD work best in classrooms where teachers are prepared to meet the challenges of disruptive behavior, low self-esteem, little persistence with academic tasks, and avoidance behaviors in the classroom. These behaviors are similar to students from low income backgrounds. Examining the history of ADHD in the classroom, it is evident best practice methods have been created. These should now be utilized in classrooms with low income populations as the students exhibit similar classroom behavior and self-esteem. This was tested with sample students at Cleveland Heights High School beginning with behavior monitoring and including methods used for working with ADHD students.
Senior Honors Project

(I.4) An Evaluation of the Critiques of Liberation Theology
Julia Hohner, Undergraduate Student
Senior Honors Project

PANEL J: Faculty Presentation
Moderator: Dr. Pam Mason, Associate Dean, College of Arts & Sciences
WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, Reading Room

“Thank You for Flying The Vomit Comet: Using Parabolic Flights to Examine Quantitatively the Stability of Liquid Bridges under Varying Total Body Force”
Dr. Greg DiLisi, Education and School Psychology

PANEL K: Shaping Visions: The Power of Rhetoric
Moderator: Dr. Brent Brossmann, Tim Russert Department of Communication & Theatre Arts
WED 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

Three undergraduate papers will be presented. All three works examine how choices made by rhetors with respect to arguments and linguistic or visual presentation shape audiences’ perceptions of particular themes. The themes include generating negative opinions of sea parks, reshaping the Church’s historical relationship with Judaism and exploring arguments for expanding leadership roles for women within Christian religions.

The first examines how the rhetorical choices made in the creation of Blackfish are designed to lead viewers to a negative vision by relying on emotional appeals (pathos), often at the expense of logical analysis (logos).

The second analyzes how the 1965 Nostra Aetate functions as an apologia – or speech of self-defense – with respect to historical accusations of anti-Semitism against the Catholic Church.

The final paper examines Rich Nathan’s “Women in leadership: How to decide what the Bible teaches” from a neo-Aristotelian perspective, examining the argumentative choices and stylistic devices Nathan employs to argue for greater inclusion of women in leadership roles within Christian religions.

(K.1) The Logic Versus Emotion Quandary: An Analysis of Blackfish
Ellen S. Dietrick, Undergraduate

The highly-acclaimed 2013 documentary Blackfish, directed by Gabriela Cowperthwaite, proved to be an overnight success story as it grieved for captive whales through the telling the story of Tilikum, the killer whale responsible for taking the lives of several SeaWorld trainers and injuring far more. Fostering millions of enthralled viewers both nationally and internationally, Blackfish’s goal is to unapologetically inform, but also affect people in an effort to challenge the continued viability of sea parks. Cowperthwaite does an excellent job of telling a story designed to maximize its emotional impact, but those decisions sometimes lead it to ignore other logical implications. The essay examines the ways in which pathos dominates logos in this film as opposed to working together to influence both heart and mind.

(K.2) Apologia Criticism of Nostra Aetate
Haley Turner, Undergraduate
The purpose of Pope Paul VI’s 1965 proclamation know as, the “Nostra Aetate: Declaration on the Relation of the Church to Non-Christian Religions” was to address the Catholic theological standpoint in regards to Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and other non-Christian faiths. Translated into “In Our Time,” the work attempts to establish new relationships between the Catholic Church and non-Christian religions. Although the work features appeals to a variety of religious, the disproportionate amount of space dedicated to Judaism suggests that reworking Jewish-Catholic relations was a primary goal of the work. Using apologia as a method, the analysis demonstrates how the Nostra Aetate functions as a means of self-defense for the Church in its effort to build a new and positive relationship with the Jewish faithful.

(K.3) Nathan and Women in Leadership
Leah Welker, Undergraduate
Limitations on the leadership roles of women within Christianity tends to place traditional Christian faith at odds with contemporary secular beliefs in women’s equality. This essay examines arguments by Rich Nathan in his essay, “Women in leadership: How to decide what the Bible teaches.” Multiple topics are explored, including the implications involved in the switch from circumcision to baptism, Israel’s patriarchal history, analysis of conflicting women’s roles, the apostle Paul’s view on women, different ways to interpret scripture, the role of redemption, the role women play in the church today, the creation story and fall, equality, a tendency to bypass scriptural authority, Jewish law, and the views of John Piper. The analysis examines both the arguments and the argumentative style of Nathan and comments on how his rhetorical choices may help open doors for women interested in leadership roles within Christian religions.

PANEL L: Living the Mission in the Classroom and the Community: School Counselors Support and Advocate for the Whole Student
Moderator: Dr. Nancy Taylor, Counseling
WED 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

(1) Dr. Nancy Taylor: “What’s YOUR Story?”
(2) Suzana Petkovic: “School Counseling Supervision Strategies Supporting the Whole Person”
(3) Marla Henderson: “Positive Pathways”
(4) Christopher Petitti: “Transactional Analysis and the Whole Person Model”
(5) Bahjah Eckstein: “Advocating the Champion in Every Child”

John Carroll’s core values include a commitment to the education of the whole person. School counseling trainees embrace the mission as they prepare to be developmental advocates. School counselors recognize the inextricable link between student’s social and emotional health and their ability to engage successfully in the learning process. As leaders within the educational community, they collaborate with others to create a supportive learning environment that nurtures both academic and social-emotional competencies. They promote inclusive excellence and a commitment to social justice. In this session a counselor educator will present the whole person model that counselor trainees incorporate into their own personal and professional identity. A doctoral student who supervises counseling trainees will discuss strategies she offers them to implement in the schools. School counseling interns will present examples of their work.

PANEL M: We the People Service-Learning Program
Moderator: Liz Deegan, Center for Service & Social Action
WED 8:00 p.m. Lombardo Student Center, Jardine Room


PANEL N: Honors Panel 3/5
Moderator: Dr. Erin Johnson, Biology
THU 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

(N.1)What are the effects of circadian rhythms on the G-protein coupled receptors involved with glucose metabolism?”
Mary Skiffey, Undergraduate Student
Circadian rhythms (CR) are 24-hour cycles that regulates physiological processes of the human body, such as sleep and blood glucose levels. They allow organisms to coordinate behavioral, physiological and molecular processes with the 24-hour light/dark cycle. CRs influence metabolism through transcriptional-translation mechanisms of time-keeping, which are activated by environmental stimuli. It is known that circadian rhythms influence glucose metabolism through a variety of ways including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs); however, the mechanisms and extent are unknown. Disrupted CRs leads to inappropriate GPCR pathway signaling, pancreatic beta-cell failure, and gene expression malfunction, which results in metabolic predisposition to disease or metabolic disease. Possible drug targets and lifestyle choices may be found to prevent or treat metabolic diseases due to new understanding of their mechanisms of action.
Senior Honors Project

(N.2) Ebola Virus Protein 24 Interactions with Phosphorylated STAT1 Signaling: A Source of Viral Pathogenesis and a Foundation for Novel Therapeutic Interventions
Alyson M. Wolk, Undergraduate Student, and Dr. Erin E. Johnson, Biology
There have been approximately 24,000 cases of Ebolavirus disease, with 9,604 deaths reported across the world, since the beginning of the 2014 West African outbreak. There are currently no antiviral drugs approved for the treatment of infection with the Ebola virus. A successful infection is partially due to the Ebola virus’s ability to subvert the immune response. Specifically, the Ebola Virus Protein 24 (eVP24) disrupts activation of the Jak-STAT pathway by type 1 interferons. Normally, following interferon stimulation, a complex called ISGF3 consisting of phosphorylated STAT1 (pSTAT1), phosphorylated STAT2 (pSTAT2), and IRF9 translocates to the nucleus and upregulates antiviral genes. eVP24 competitively binds to KPNA1, the nuclear import protein that moves ISGF3 into the nucleus, thus limiting the ability of the cell to mount an antiviral response. Previous studies from our lab have demonstrated that two small organic compounds, namely KH01 and KH02, increase the expression of pSTAT1 in the presence of type I interferons. The present study aims to use KH compounds to overcome the blockade of pSTAT1 from the nucleus caused by eVP24. Successful restoration of the immune response by these compounds may give insight into novel therapeutic approaches for treating Ebolavirus disease.
Senior Honors Project

(N.3) Mathematical Explorations of Card Tricks
Timothy Weeks, Undergraduate Student
In this talk, we demonstrate several card tricks and discuss the mathematical basis for their success. This project explores the mathematical bases behind certain card tricks. Using mathematics and mathematical techniques obtained from four years of math classes, each trick is proven to work.
Senior Honors Project


PANEL 0: Faculty Presentation 2/2
Moderator: Dr. Jim Krukones, Associate Academic Vice President
THU 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203
Presentation by Dr. Brad Hull, Management, Marketing & Logistics

THU 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session O
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: TRS Student Panel: Engaging Contemporary Issues
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies

PANEL P: Honors Panel 4/5
Moderator: Dr. Maria Marsilli, History
THU 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

(P.1) A Classy Constitution: Classical Influences on the United States Constitution from Ancient Greece and Roman History and Political Thought
Shamir Brice, Undergraduate Student
Senior Honors Project

(P.2) If You Can Learn to Do It, I Can Learn to Do It: The Introduction of Humanism to the Court of Henry VII
Stephanie Haas, Undergraduate; Dr. Anne Kugler, History
Upon assuming the throne after thirty years of civil war and eleven years of exile on the European continent, Henry VII restructured the English government, consolidated royal power, and suppressed rebellions to his rule. Historians have studied Henry’s political and economic policies thoroughly, painting a picture of this fifteenth century ruler as imposing and frugal, focused on strengthening his control over the country. Despite this reputation, Henry VII in fact made an immeasurable contribution to England in terms of culture as well as political structure and financial security. Due to his exposure to Renaissance thought on the continent, he sought to implement humanism and art in his own court through his employment of scholars and artistic patronage, bringing England out of medieval obscurity and into the Renaissance. This paper explores the motivations and results of these cultural efforts by analyzing his patronization of humanist scholars and Renaissance artists.
Senior Honors Project

(P.3) Women in the A​eneid:​ Foreign, Female, and a Threat to Traditional Roman Society or Examples of Model Male Citizens?

Colleen Reilly, Undergraduate Student
Senior Honors Project

PANEL Q: Latin American Immersion Experiences: Why Travel to the Place you Study?

Moderator: Anne Mc Ginness, Campus Ministry
THU 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

Panelists: Julia Hohner, Stephen Politano, Elliott Schermerhorn, Ghada Abushaweesh, Undergraduates

What difference does it make in students’ lives and education to travel to the place they study? This panel addresses the value of Immersion Experiences and service learning. The students will argue that they developed soft skills, in addition to accomplishing the traditional academic learning goals. Soft skills, which are often not assessed in academia, include personality traits and social skills, such as increased empathy and compassion, improved leadership skills and confidence, willingness to try something new, etc. The discussion will center on the students’ goals prior to travel; how the students accomplished or exceeded these goals and expectations (or how they fell short); the most valuable lessons they learned in country that could not have been learned in the classroom; and the ways in which they were changed by the experience. All of the panelists did a 1-credit course and Thursday night preparation meetings prior to travel.

PANEL R: Program Evaluation for the Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland
Moderator: Dr. Penny Harris, Sociology & Criminology
THU 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

Panelists: Samantha Bailey, Elizabeth Bencivenni, Mark Berdelle, Ricardo Caraballo, Laura Grasinger, Taylor Hartman, Emma McCarthy, Madeline Metsch, Breahana Phillips, and Brittany Thompson

In fall 2014, an advanced sociology class on poverty and welfare at John Carroll University (JCU), conducted a program evaluation for the Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland (NHS). Students conducted qualitative interviews with 11 individuals, the majority of which being clients of NHS’ Sustaining Home Ownership Program. Through these interviews, it was found that illness, unemployment, and family dissolution were common causes of financial hardship that resulted in issues with clients’ home ownership. The clients, who were referred to NHS through a variety of sources, reported a general satisfaction with the services they utilized, but many lack in-depth knowledge of other services within NHS. Clients also suggested better marketing of NHS along with an emphasis on preventative services such as financial counseling for new homeowners.

PANEL S: Arrupe Scholars 3/3
Moderator: Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Director
THU 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

THU 5:00 pm. PANEL T: Honors Panel 5/5: Film Panel
Moderator: Dr. Maria Marsilli, History
THU 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

(T.1) School of Hard Knocks
Ashley Bastock, Undergraduate Student
School of Hard Knocks is a documentary film about concussions and the negative impact they have over many different athletes’ lives. The aim of this film keeps in mind the hypothesis of my research: The only way to decrease the harmful effects of concussions is to change attitudes of parents, athletes and coaches alike. This film aims to change those attitudes by telling the story of four athletes from high school, college and professional levels of sport. With the help of medical professionals, the topics range from the definition of a concussion, to second-impact syndrome, to Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. Through the interviews of Rachael Williams, Tori Bellucci, Bob Golic and Bernie Kosar, viewers begin to understand what it is like when an athlete receives a concussion. Dr. Richard Figler, Dr. Kirsten Hawkins, Michelle Fowler and Brittany Urbania explain the medical issues and treatment surrounding these head injuries. Senior Honors Project

(T.2) Professional Exploration: The Radio Industry
*Hailey Meinen, Undergraduate; Dr. Alan Stephenson, Tim Russert Department of Communication and Theatre Arts
This documentary serves as an introduction into the radio industry, intended for high school or college students interested in pursuing a career in broadcasting. Former, current, and future members of broadcast careers were interviewed in order to gain insight into the changes the industry has seen and is still undergoing, as well as the demands and expectations professionals in the industry can expect to face.
Senior Honors Project

Tuesday Sessions | Wednesday Sessions | Thursday Sessions

PANEL: TRS Student Panel: Engaging Contemporary Issues
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies
TUE 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session Dolan Science Center, A203

(1) Is Homosexuality an Abomination?
Michael Younes, Undergraduate
This paper explores the relationship between homosexuality and the Hebrew Bible. I analyze the main “texts of terror” which many believers regard as opposing homosexuality. I then juxtapose the Biblical texts to the cultures that surrounded the biblical world, e.g. Egypt and Babylon. Using Biblical material, primary source documents from Josephus and Origen, along side texts from the Levantine cultures, I seek to find out what the scriptures say and why they say what they do.

(2) When Digital Culture Transforms the Process of Church Teaching: Solidarity in an Age of Digital Immediacy
John Barrett, Undergraduate
I address how Catholic Church teaching is mediated within the contemporary culture landscape – through digital communication technology. No longer limited to the traditional genres of church teaching such as allocutions, apostolic exhortations, and encyclicals, papal statements can now be disseminated and interpreted through digital venues. When the pope utilizes digital communication, he contributes to the reality of a broader cultural dynamic – namely, “digital immediacy.” On the one hand, digital immediacy seems to be beneficial since it allows the laity to access ecclesial information quickly and easily. On the other hand, digital immediacy transforms the Catholic Church’s ability to teach I suggest that the challenge is not insurmountable, but that it requires the church to employ methods that embed church teaching within the broader Catholic tradition and encourage popular agency among the laity. I explore how a university’s campus ministry program might actualize this requirement.

(3) The Colossians Household Code and a Hermeneutic of Hunger: Reading Colossians 3:18–4:1 from a Contemporary Experience of Sexual Oppression
Matthew Michels, Undergraduate
Interpretation of biblical texts is not a neutral enterprise: the interpreter is always implicated in her hermeneutic. My paper self consciously takes up a hermeneutic of hunger to address the “christianized” Greco Roman household code contained in Colossians 3:18–4:1. The historical context for the inclusion of this passage in this deutero Pauline letter reveals an authorial strategy to adapt the faith of the fledgling Christian community to the standards of Greco Roman patriarchy. At the same time, a “gospel dynamism” characterizes this letter, as the author chooses to include a modified form of the baptismal equality formula seen in Paul’s letter to the Galatians. The paper takes this gospel dynamism as a breach in the logic that led to adaptation of the household code and from this proceeds to recommendations for engaging contemporary manifestations of oppression of the queer community.

(4) Liberia, Ebola, and a Hermeneutic of Hunger: Mark 12:38-44 as a Model for the Reasonable Expectation of Support
Joy Parker, Undergraduate
Mark 12:38-44 has traditionally been read as a pericope about sacrificial giving. But contemporary interpretation suggests two important correctives: first, there may be a multiplicity of valuable – though not equal – meanings; and second, attention must be paid to individuals – namely the widow – who remain voiceless in the story. This paper will discuss the recent Ebola crisis in West Africa and assert that the absence of meaningful response to this crisis was – and is – symptomatic of a larger attitude toward Black Africa. A history of exploitative and negligent policies in Liberia will be established as a case study undergirding this argument. Then the short passage from Mark will be examined against this backdrop for principles that might illumine discussion around what constitutes a humane response to tragedy. These two threads will be woven together and a proposal issued around ways individuals, small communities and larger organizations can – and should – respond to such a crisis.

PANEL A: Individual Papers 1/2
Moderator:
Dr. Cynthia Marco Scanlon, Center for Career Services
TUE 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

(A.1) How are Institutions of Higher Education Implementing Transition Courses for Student Veterans? A Pilot Study
Rebecca McMenamin, Graduate Student
To better support first-year student veterans in their transition from the military to college life, current literature recommends the use of a transition course (DeSawal, 2013; Livingston & Bauman, 2013; Mikelson & Saunders, 2013; Vacchi, 2014). However, it does not offer empirical research on how institutions are implementing this intervention and if this tool is indeed effective at increasing retention and persistence toward graduation. In this pilot study, five institutions of various size and locations were surveyed to discover common themes related to their courses’ structure, objectives, assignments, and assessment practices. More advanced courses were found to progressively deviate from the traditional first-year seminar model and include content areas specific to veterans’ needs such as translating military experience and vocational discernment/development.

(A.2) Wallace Stevens’s Salvaging
Robert Haas, alumnus
How could Wallace Stevens be simultaneously a major 20th century poet and a highly successful businessman? Many commentators simply ignore any possible conflict between the two roles. But Stevens himself, in an essay describing his work as an insurance lawyer – vice-president of the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company, explained how he felt it was an essential part of his job to try to salvage contracts that the company’s clients, after having gone bankrupt, could no longer fulfill. This talk suggests that a similar altruistic impulse motivated Stevens’s early poetry that tried, through beauty, to salvage his era’s widespread loss of religious faith. ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes, and Reviews 27(4)(2014)182-188.

(A.3) Failing the Fagan Cognition Test
Robert Haas, alumnus
Long-time CWRU psychology professor Dr. Joseph F. Fagan III’s ingenious language-free intelligence test assesses a baby’s memory and curiosity simply by observing whether it stares longer at the unfamiliar one in a pair of pictures. In principle the test could work for adults too, e.g. for senility testing. But an adult, unlike a baby, knows he is being tested. The speaker will present his scenario how anxiety and an attempt to beat the test might then directly cause the subject to fail it. The Mathematical Intelligencer 37(1)(2015)62-63.

PANEL B: Arrupe Panel 1/3
Moderator:
Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Scholars Program
TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

PANEL C: Individual Papers 2/2
Moderator:TBA
TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

(C.1) The French or the American care taker (nursing) programs
Nickencia Weaver, Undergraduate

(C.2) Failing the Fagan Cognition Test

Robert Haas, alumnus
Long-time CWRU psychology professor Dr. Joseph F. Fagan III’s ingenious language-free intelligence test assesses a baby’s memory and curiosity simply by observing whether it stares longer at the unfamiliar one in a pair of pictures. In principle the test could work for adults too, e.g. for senility testing. But an adult, unlike a baby, knows he is being tested. The speaker will present his scenario how anxiety and an attempt to beat the test might then directly cause the subject to fail it. The Mathematical Intelligencer (2015, in press). See Panel A above.

PANEL D: Rape Narratives and the Rhetoric of Sexual Violence
Moderator: Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, Reading Room

This panel will explore the rhetoric of rape and examine how rape narratives in literature perpetuate misconceptions about the nature of the crime and the circumstances under which it is committed. We will focus on the problems that come from misunderstanding consent, incorrect definitions of crimes, and how to best support survivors. The panel will also explore the problems of sexual violence specific to college campuses and John Carroll. The goal of the panel will be to gain a greater understanding of the issue of rape in literature and in popular media to reach conclusions about how to work towards a society in which a more realistic, comprehensive discussion of rape and sexual consent leads to more support for survivors of rape and less instances of rape. Open discussions of these difficult concepts are important for preventing future crimes and for helping survivors come forward with their stories.

(D.1) Rape, Non-consensual Sex, and Sexual Assault: What is the Difference
Jennifer Vrobel, Undergraduate; Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
There can be difficulty applying words to complicated situations because there is ambiguity between the word and its definition. An example of this is rape. Rape is the “penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without consent of the victim…” (Basu, 2012). This paper discusses that the misconceptions of the rape and its definition continue in modern culture within universities and colleges because there was not a clear definition of rape until 2012, there are different words that are used to replace rape that are employed by different institutions, and colleges and universities, including John Carroll University, establish those different words within their interpersonal relationship policies.

(D.2) Consent: Defining the Undefinable
Michael Gong, Undergraduate; Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
This analysis of consent and its definition shows how it is nearly impossible to come up with a universally understandable and acceptable standard of consent. From the rhetorical analysis, it is evident that specific word and phrase choice can strongly affect the definition of consent. A main point from the comparison section (comparing the John Carroll University Interpersonal Violence Policy with the Xavier University Student Handbook) is how similarities in definitions can help to give them each legitimacy but also take away from the ability to clear up uncertainty. The point of including a case study was to show how rulings on consent can and must vary on a case by case basis and are dependent on personal testimonies. Finally, the addition of alcohol and other drugs can completely take away the credibility of any form of consent. There are countless factors that have serious implications on the variety of interpretations of consent, and this is an issue that will have to be continually addressed.

(D.3) The Rape Epidemic on College Campuses
William Cameron, Undergraduate; Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
Twenty five percent of college students will be raped during their four years of undergraduate studies. Several victims will not even know it. In a social scene built upon empty bottles and beer cans, the lines between right and wrong can appear blurred. Differentiating between a regrettable hook-up and experiencing rape can be a confusing task. Despite the knowledge of a university rape culture, many college administrations make inadequate efforts to educate about rape, then prevent, and punish the crime. A survey conducted at John Carroll University put this deficiency on display as students incorrectly defined rape and how to report it. Additionally, many students identified scenarios involving rape as “not rape”. This paper explores the rape culture of universities and attempts to provide a solution to the crisis.

(D.4) Moving Survivor Discourse into the Dominant Discourse
Erin Kelley, Graduate; Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
In this paper, I examine texts of various survivors that are aimed at several specific audiences. I explore the problems survivors encounter when telling their narratives across genres to distinctly different audiences to argue that by focusing on validating and supporting rather than challenging the reality of survivors, audiences can shape their reactions to trauma to support recovery of individual survivors. The central texts are Alice Sebold’s Lucky, Dylan Farrow’s Open Letter against Woody Allen, and the online community Self-Care After Rape. I compare instances where these survivors are challenged to times where they were supported. The paper concludes that by including survivors back into communities their trauma excludes them from and excluding perpetrators who do not understand or admit the faults in their actions, we can fight rape culture and move towards a world without sexual violence.


PANEL E: Violence and Virginity in Medieval Narratives
Moderator: Dr. Emily Butler, English
WED 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

In this panel, we explore both the limitations on medieval women and the ways that they exploited these limitations to claim their own agency. Whether physically or within texts, women faced threats of violence and denigrations of their authorial or personal identities. Nevertheless, we do a disservice to these women and to the cultures of the Middle Ages if we assume that the period simply lacked in assertive, challenging narratives from and about women. The papers in this panel highlight the complications in this nexus of challenging narratives, from saints’ lives to secular fables. We will also demonstrate how these medieval texts raise questions about our own contemporary understanding of gender and social norms.

(E.1) The Destructive Properties of Virginity in Medieval Religious Texts​
Sean Kirby, Graduate Student
In medieval literature, determining whether or not a woman was a virgin allowed society to pass judgment on that woman’s morality. If a woman was not a virgin, she was deemed “unpure”—even if she acted in a manner that would please the Lord. Conversely, society also condemned virgin women for being susceptible to sin. So, it did not truly matter if a woman was a virgin or not—she was condemned instead for having a body that could be penetrated and polluted. In conclusion, I intend to argue that the ideals associated with virginity strongly encourage religious women to devalue their physical bodies—the very thing that makes them feminine—to better emulate Christ, which is a nearly impossible task.

(E.2) She Bore Me to Humankind’​: Birthing a New Model for Medieval Mothers in the Hagiographies of Transvestite Saints
Katie Ours, Graduate Student
In this paper, I argue the hagiographies, Life of Saint Euphrosyne and the Life of Saint Eugenia, featured in Ælfric’s work, Lives of Saints, provide a dynamic model of motherhood – at times both subversive and compliant to medieval gender norms – for a Christian wife and mother to adopt. To argue this point, I discuss the similarities and differences associated with male and female saint stories in regards to the virtue of virginity. I outline various critical interpretations of these hagiographies in order to suggest an absence concerning the presence of motherhood; these critics often focus on the patriarchal lineage and the masculine language. Building on this background, I examine these texts to analyze each mother’s role in helping her respective daughter reach sainthood; and while these mothers gain access to heaven, they still are not afforded the agency to become a saint even though they maintain their spiritual virginity.

(E.3) Making Contact: Reading Marie de France’s Violent Language in the Lais
Darcy Egan, Graduate Student
Building on an admittedly limited foundation of Marie de France’s biographical identity, I will examine her declared authorial intent to rescue the lais from obscurity and transpose aventure, or physical experience, to writing. Then, I will complicate the discussion by analyzing her rhetorical use of violence, tracing various scenes of bodily harm and cruelty throughout the lais. For many, these critical threads of authorship and violence might seem entirely unrelated, but I contend that these two discussions are actually quite complementary. I argue that Marie de France raises the stakes in the discussion of authorial intent, pinning down words, but also making language physical and dangerous. Within the lais, reading is not an isolated task, but a dynamic and demanding relationship between reader and writer, as Marie de France constructs the act of interpretation as a violent assault on her physical body.


PANEL F: Honors Panel 1/5
Moderator: Dr. Colin Swearingen, Political Science
WED 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, Reading Room

(F.1) Cigarette Tax and its Affect on Smoking Behavior
Calli Hudock, Undergraduate Student
According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, a 10% increase in cigarette prices can reduce consumption by 3-5%. This paper uses regression analysis to examine the effects of state excise taxes, the absence of healthcare coverage, alcohol consumption, unemployment, education and age on the percentage of current smokers. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of excise taxes in combating smoking behavior across all 50 states given cigarettes’ relatively inelastic demand and highly addictive quality.
Senior Honors Project

(F.2) Impact Analysis of Improved Hydrokinetic Project Regulations
Joseph McHugh, Undergraduate Student
The United States relies mainly on fossil fuels to meet its energy demand, but it is beginning to look into renewable energy alternatives. One such alternative is hydrokinetic technology, which captures the kinetic energy found in waves, tides and currents. Although initially hampered by regulatory uncertainty and low government backing, hydrokinetic technology is now gaining traction within the United States. Improved regulations and government laws are promoting research and development in the field, which will lead to more projects. This paper performs an impact analysis of an increased number of hydrokinetic energy projects as a result of reduced regulatory uncertainty and increased government backing, focusing on the impacts on the environment and the economy.
Senior Honors Project

(F.3) The Greenhouse Effect: What is the Relationship between Media Attention and Supreme Court Law Clerk Diversity?
Alexis Mittereder, Undergraduate Student
Previous research shows that Supreme Court Justices are attentive of media coverage by elite news sources and their decision making process may be influenced by their desire for favorable press coverage. This theory, called the Greenhouse Effect after Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Linda Greenhouse, suggests that the Court is not insulated from popular opinion, but that public opinion influences Justices’ decision making process. This study aims to investigate whether this attention to public opinion by way of media coverage impacts other court processes, namely law clerk selection. More specifically, it explores the power of media attention in relation to diversity of the Court law clerk cohort. If research shows that a rise in clerk diversity follows an increase in media attention on clerk diversity, a case can be made that the Supreme Court is cognizant of media attention and is not insulated from the opinions of elite media sources.
Senior Honors Project

PANEL G: Explorations of the Social Condition
Moderator: Dr. Gloria Vaquera, Sociology & Criminology
WED 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

(G.1) Food, Ethnicity and Identity: An Exploration of Italian Identity”
Kenneth Farona, Undergraduate; Dr. Susan Long, Sociology and Criminology
My goal is to explore the relationship between food and culture in Italian identity from an anthropological perspective. By analyzing culinary traditions as well as historical agriculture systems, I hope to demonstrate why Italian identity and culture is so much defined by food. Using essential texts and films that explore what it means to be “Italian” I seek to provide an understanding of food’s primary role in the creation of culture and its importance to Italian culture. Preliminary findings will be presented.

(G.2) Church as a Site of Social Capital Acquisition for Immigrants
Jose “Alex” Esparza, Undergraduate; Dr. Gloria Vaquera, Sociology and Criminology
Understanding the immigrant experience and how communities adapt to new cultures has interested social science researchers for decades. This paper focuses on understanding the role of church communities in assisting new immigrants adapt to life in the United States. This paper reviews research focusing on various immigrant communities stretching from the East coast to the West coast. Research suggests that the church participation assists new immigrant in forming a new sense of community and building social networks that are beneficial in securing employment, housing and basic necessities.

(G.3) Low-Income Students and the College Experience
Brittany Thompson, Undergraduate; Dr. Phyllis Harris, Sociology and Criminology
Throughout history, education has been thought of as an equalizer in terms of social class and mobility. However, research has repeatedly revealed that the education system simply reproduces existing inequalities. This study involved exploring the experiences of four students, self identified as coming from lower economic backgrounds, whom are currently attending John Carroll University or who have recently graduated. This study focused on barriers to success that ranged from marginalization to the stress of managing work and academics. When analyzing the interviews, it is clear that these individuals faced adversity and hardship not typically experienced by their peers of higher economic status. The overwhelming question is what can be done to better meet the needs of students from lower economic backgrounds? These students believed that things like support services, student advocacy, mentorship from faculty, and a larger minority presence could set low-income students up to succeed at John Carroll University.

(G.4) Body Image Perceptions and Disorders among College Men: The Influences of Identity
Taylor Hartman, Undergraduate; Dr. Medora Barnes, Sociology and Criminology
Body image problems and eating disorders were once thought of “women’s only” disorders, yet men suffer too from these problems. Over the last few decades, the increased emphasis by the media and on men being muscular and fit, and changing cultural body norms have encouraged men to be more conscious of their appearance and led to a rise in male eating disorders. Due to cultural standards of masculinity, men may have negative attitudes toward seeking psychological help and treatment for issues related to body dysmorphic or eating disorders. In this study, I use face-to-face interviews with college men to explore the ways in which the men’s interlocking identities (gender, race, class, sexuality, age, etc.) influence their perceptions of body image and their embodied experiences.


PANEL H: Arrupe Panel 2/3
Moderator: Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Scholars Program
WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

PANEL I: Honors Panel 2/5
Moderator: Dr. Colin Swearingen, Political Science
WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

(I.1) A Compassion That Can Stand in Awe: Exploring and Addressing Homelessness through Sociological Analyses, Narratives, and Theological Responses
Keri Grove, Undergraduate Student; Faculty Advisors: Dr. Metres, Dr. Clark
Scholars generally present two theories about homelessness— that homelessness is caused by personal flaws and personal poor choices, and that homelessness is caused by structural factors. In reality, these theories intertwine; homelessness is caused by a combination of personal fault and societal injustice. Regardless of the cause of homelessness, however, all homeless people have dignity and should be treated as so. This project analyses the causes of homelessness, shares the stories of many of the homeless I have met through the John Carroll Labre Project, and uses Catholic Social Teaching to argue that Catholics are called to engage in social justice and solidarity to work to end homelessness.
Senior Honors Project

(I.2) An Economic Examination of the Re-Structured Education System in New Orleans Ten Years after Hurricane Katrina
Brianna Lazarchik, Undergraduate Student
Senior Honors Project

(I.3) Utilizing ADHD Methods to Support Low Performing Classrooms
Elizabeth Malloy, Undergraduate; Dr. Thomas Kelly, Education and School Psychology
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) impacts one in ten students. Students with ADHD work best in classrooms where teachers are prepared to meet the challenges of disruptive behavior, low self-esteem, little persistence with academic tasks, and avoidance behaviors in the classroom. These behaviors are similar to students from low income backgrounds. Examining the history of ADHD in the classroom, it is evident best practice methods have been created. These should now be utilized in classrooms with low income populations as the students exhibit similar classroom behavior and self-esteem. This was tested with sample students at Cleveland Heights High School beginning with behavior monitoring and including methods used for working with ADHD students.
Senior Honors Project

(I.4) An Evaluation of the Critiques of Liberation Theology
Julia Hohner, Undergraduate Student
Senior Honors Project

PANEL J: Faculty Presentation
Moderator: Dr. Pam Mason, Associate Dean, College of Arts & Sciences
WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, Reading Room

“Thank You for Flying The Vomit Comet: Using Parabolic Flights to Examine Quantitatively the Stability of Liquid Bridges under Varying Total Body Force”
Dr. Greg DiLisi, Education and School Psychology

PANEL K: Shaping Visions: The Power of Rhetoric
Moderator: Dr. Brent Brossmann, Tim Russert Department of Communication & Theatre Arts
WED 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

Three undergraduate papers will be presented. All three works examine how choices made by rhetors with respect to arguments and linguistic or visual presentation shape audiences’ perceptions of particular themes. The themes include generating negative opinions of sea parks, reshaping the Church’s historical relationship with Judaism and exploring arguments for expanding leadership roles for women within Christian religions.

The first examines how the rhetorical choices made in the creation of Blackfish are designed to lead viewers to a negative vision by relying on emotional appeals (pathos), often at the expense of logical analysis (logos).

The second analyzes how the 1965 Nostra Aetate functions as an apologia – or speech of self-defense – with respect to historical accusations of anti-Semitism against the Catholic Church.

The final paper examines Rich Nathan’s “Women in leadership: How to decide what the Bible teaches” from a neo-Aristotelian perspective, examining the argumentative choices and stylistic devices Nathan employs to argue for greater inclusion of women in leadership roles within Christian religions.

(K.1) The Logic Versus Emotion Quandary: An Analysis of Blackfish
Ellen S. Dietrick, Undergraduate

The highly-acclaimed 2013 documentary Blackfish, directed by Gabriela Cowperthwaite, proved to be an overnight success story as it grieved for captive whales through the telling the story of Tilikum, the killer whale responsible for taking the lives of several SeaWorld trainers and injuring far more. Fostering millions of enthralled viewers both nationally and internationally, Blackfish’s goal is to unapologetically inform, but also affect people in an effort to challenge the continued viability of sea parks. Cowperthwaite does an excellent job of telling a story designed to maximize its emotional impact, but those decisions sometimes lead it to ignore other logical implications. The essay examines the ways in which pathos dominates logos in this film as opposed to working together to influence both heart and mind.

(K.2) Apologia Criticism of Nostra Aetate
Haley Turner, Undergraduate
The purpose of Pope Paul VI’s 1965 proclamation know as, the “Nostra Aetate: Declaration on the Relation of the Church to Non-Christian Religions” was to address the Catholic theological standpoint in regards to Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and other non-Christian faiths. Translated into “In Our Time,” the work attempts to establish new relationships between the Catholic Church and non-Christian religions. Although the work features appeals to a variety of religious, the disproportionate amount of space dedicated to Judaism suggests that reworking Jewish-Catholic relations was a primary goal of the work. Using apologia as a method, the analysis demonstrates how the Nostra Aetate functions as a means of self-defense for the Church in its effort to build a new and positive relationship with the Jewish faithful.

(K.3) Nathan and Women in Leadership
Leah Welker, Undergraduate
Limitations on the leadership roles of women within Christianity tends to place traditional Christian faith at odds with contemporary secular beliefs in women’s equality. This essay examines arguments by Rich Nathan in his essay, “Women in leadership: How to decide what the Bible teaches.” Multiple topics are explored, including the implications involved in the switch from circumcision to baptism, Israel’s patriarchal history, analysis of conflicting women’s roles, the apostle Paul’s view on women, different ways to interpret scripture, the role of redemption, the role women play in the church today, the creation story and fall, equality, a tendency to bypass scriptural authority, Jewish law, and the views of John Piper. The analysis examines both the arguments and the argumentative style of Nathan and comments on how his rhetorical choices may help open doors for women interested in leadership roles within Christian religions.

PANEL L: Living the Mission in the Classroom and the Community: School Counselors Support and Advocate for the Whole Student
Moderator: Dr. Nancy Taylor, Counseling
WED 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

(1) Dr. Nancy Taylor: “What’s YOUR Story?”
(2) Suzana Petkovic: “School Counseling Supervision Strategies Supporting the Whole Person”
(3) Marla Henderson: “Positive Pathways”
(4) Christopher Petitti: “Transactional Analysis and the Whole Person Model”
(5) Bahjah Eckstein: “Advocating the Champion in Every Child”

John Carroll’s core values include a commitment to the education of the whole person. School counseling trainees embrace the mission as they prepare to be developmental advocates. School counselors recognize the inextricable link between student’s social and emotional health and their ability to engage successfully in the learning process. As leaders within the educational community, they collaborate with others to create a supportive learning environment that nurtures both academic and social-emotional competencies. They promote inclusive excellence and a commitment to social justice. In this session a counselor educator will present the whole person model that counselor trainees incorporate into their own personal and professional identity. A doctoral student who supervises counseling trainees will discuss strategies she offers them to implement in the schools. School counseling interns will present examples of their work.

PANEL M: We the People Service-Learning Program
Moderator: Liz Deegan, Center for Service & Social Action
WED 8:00 p.m. Lombardo Student Center, Jardine Room


PANEL N: Honors Panel 3/5
Moderator: Dr. Erin Johnson, Biology
THU 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

(N.1)What are the effects of circadian rhythms on the G-protein coupled receptors involved with glucose metabolism?”
Mary Skiffey, Undergraduate Student
Circadian rhythms (CR) are 24-hour cycles that regulates physiological processes of the human body, such as sleep and blood glucose levels. They allow organisms to coordinate behavioral, physiological and molecular processes with the 24-hour light/dark cycle. CRs influence metabolism through transcriptional-translation mechanisms of time-keeping, which are activated by environmental stimuli. It is known that circadian rhythms influence glucose metabolism through a variety of ways including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs); however, the mechanisms and extent are unknown. Disrupted CRs leads to inappropriate GPCR pathway signaling, pancreatic beta-cell failure, and gene expression malfunction, which results in metabolic predisposition to disease or metabolic disease. Possible drug targets and lifestyle choices may be found to prevent or treat metabolic diseases due to new understanding of their mechanisms of action.
Senior Honors Project

(N.2) Ebola Virus Protein 24 Interactions with Phosphorylated STAT1 Signaling: A Source of Viral Pathogenesis and a Foundation for Novel Therapeutic Interventions
Alyson M. Wolk, Undergraduate Student, and Dr. Erin E. Johnson, Biology
There have been approximately 24,000 cases of Ebolavirus disease, with 9,604 deaths reported across the world, since the beginning of the 2014 West African outbreak. There are currently no antiviral drugs approved for the treatment of infection with the Ebola virus. A successful infection is partially due to the Ebola virus’s ability to subvert the immune response. Specifically, the Ebola Virus Protein 24 (eVP24) disrupts activation of the Jak-STAT pathway by type 1 interferons. Normally, following interferon stimulation, a complex called ISGF3 consisting of phosphorylated STAT1 (pSTAT1), phosphorylated STAT2 (pSTAT2), and IRF9 translocates to the nucleus and upregulates antiviral genes. eVP24 competitively binds to KPNA1, the nuclear import protein that moves ISGF3 into the nucleus, thus limiting the ability of the cell to mount an antiviral response. Previous studies from our lab have demonstrated that two small organic compounds, namely KH01 and KH02, increase the expression of pSTAT1 in the presence of type I interferons. The present study aims to use KH compounds to overcome the blockade of pSTAT1 from the nucleus caused by eVP24. Successful restoration of the immune response by these compounds may give insight into novel therapeutic approaches for treating Ebolavirus disease.
Senior Honors Project

(N.3) Mathematical Explorations of Card Tricks
Timothy Weeks, Undergraduate Student
In this talk, we demonstrate several card tricks and discuss the mathematical basis for their success. This project explores the mathematical bases behind certain card tricks. Using mathematics and mathematical techniques obtained from four years of math classes, each trick is proven to work.
Senior Honors Project


PANEL 0: Faculty Presentation 2/2
Moderator: Dr. Jim Krukones, Associate Academic Vice President
THU 2-3:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203
Presentation by Dr. Brad Hull, Management, Marketing & Logistics

THU 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session O
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: TRS Student Panel: Engaging Contemporary Issues
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies

PANEL P: Honors Panel 4/5
Moderator: Dr. Maria Marsilli, History
THU 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

(P.1) A Classy Constitution: Classical Influences on the United States Constitution from Ancient Greece and Roman History and Political Thought
Shamir Brice, Undergraduate Student
Senior Honors Project

(P.2) If You Can Learn to Do It, I Can Learn to Do It: The Introduction of Humanism to the Court of Henry VII
Stephanie Haas, Undergraduate; Dr. Anne Kugler, History
Upon assuming the throne after thirty years of civil war and eleven years of exile on the European continent, Henry VII restructured the English government, consolidated royal power, and suppressed rebellions to his rule. Historians have studied Henry’s political and economic policies thoroughly, painting a picture of this fifteenth century ruler as imposing and frugal, focused on strengthening his control over the country. Despite this reputation, Henry VII in fact made an immeasurable contribution to England in terms of culture as well as political structure and financial security. Due to his exposure to Renaissance thought on the continent, he sought to implement humanism and art in his own court through his employment of scholars and artistic patronage, bringing England out of medieval obscurity and into the Renaissance. This paper explores the motivations and results of these cultural efforts by analyzing his patronization of humanist scholars and Renaissance artists.
Senior Honors Project

(P.3) Women in the A​eneid:​ Foreign, Female, and a Threat to Traditional Roman Society or Examples of Model Male Citizens?

Colleen Reilly, Undergraduate Student
Senior Honors Project

PANEL Q: Latin American Immersion Experiences: Why Travel to the Place you Study?

Moderator: Anne Mc Ginness, Campus Ministry
THU 3:30-4:45 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

Panelists: Julia Hohner, Stephen Politano, Elliott Schermerhorn, Ghada Abushaweesh, Undergraduates

What difference does it make in students’ lives and education to travel to the place they study? This panel addresses the value of Immersion Experiences and service learning. The students will argue that they developed soft skills, in addition to accomplishing the traditional academic learning goals. Soft skills, which are often not assessed in academia, include personality traits and social skills, such as increased empathy and compassion, improved leadership skills and confidence, willingness to try something new, etc. The discussion will center on the students’ goals prior to travel; how the students accomplished or exceeded these goals and expectations (or how they fell short); the most valuable lessons they learned in country that could not have been learned in the classroom; and the ways in which they were changed by the experience. All of the panelists did a 1-credit course and Thursday night preparation meetings prior to travel.

PANEL R: Program Evaluation for the Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland
Moderator: Dr. Penny Harris, Sociology & Criminology
THU 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A202

Panelists: Samantha Bailey, Elizabeth Bencivenni, Mark Berdelle, Ricardo Caraballo, Laura Grasinger, Taylor Hartman, Emma McCarthy, Madeline Metsch, Breahana Phillips, and Brittany Thompson

In fall 2014, an advanced sociology class on poverty and welfare at John Carroll University (JCU), conducted a program evaluation for the Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland (NHS). Students conducted qualitative interviews with 11 individuals, the majority of which being clients of NHS’ Sustaining Home Ownership Program. Through these interviews, it was found that illness, unemployment, and family dissolution were common causes of financial hardship that resulted in issues with clients’ home ownership. The clients, who were referred to NHS through a variety of sources, reported a general satisfaction with the services they utilized, but many lack in-depth knowledge of other services within NHS. Clients also suggested better marketing of NHS along with an emphasis on preventative services such as financial counseling for new homeowners.

PANEL S: Arrupe Scholars 3/3
Moderator: Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Director
THU 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, A203

THU 5:00 pm. PANEL T: Honors Panel 5/5: Film Panel
Moderator: Dr. Maria Marsilli, History
THU 5-6:15 p.m. Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium

(T.1) School of Hard Knocks
Ashley Bastock, Undergraduate Student
School of Hard Knocks is a documentary film about concussions and the negative impact they have over many different athletes’ lives. The aim of this film keeps in mind the hypothesis of my research: The only way to decrease the harmful effects of concussions is to change attitudes of parents, athletes and coaches alike. This film aims to change those attitudes by telling the story of four athletes from high school, college and professional levels of sport. With the help of medical professionals, the topics range from the definition of a concussion, to second-impact syndrome, to Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. Through the interviews of Rachael Williams, Tori Bellucci, Bob Golic and Bernie Kosar, viewers begin to understand what it is like when an athlete receives a concussion. Dr. Richard Figler, Dr. Kirsten Hawkins, Michelle Fowler and Brittany Urbania explain the medical issues and treatment surrounding these head injuries. Senior Honors Project

(T.2) Professional Exploration: The Radio Industry
*Hailey Meinen, Undergraduate; Dr. Alan Stephenson, Tim Russert Department of Communication and Theatre Arts
This documentary serves as an introduction into the radio industry, intended for high school or college students interested in pursuing a career in broadcasting. Former, current, and future members of broadcast careers were interviewed in order to gain insight into the changes the industry has seen and is still undergoing, as well as the demands and expectations professionals in the industry can expect to face.
Senior Honors Project

TUE 7:00 p.m. Public Lecture
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium
“When Christmas Was a Crime:  the Nativity Feast during the Puritan Interlewd”
Dr. Joseph Kelly, Theology & Religious Studies

In the mid-seventeenth century the Puritan governments in both England and New England made it a crime to celebrate Christmas and imposed fines or jail time for the “criminals” who violated this law.  In this presentation Dr. Kelly will explain why this happened and how Christmas prevailed.

WED 7:00 p.m. Public Lecture
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium
“Word for Word? Biblical Epics in Late Antiquity”
By Patrick McBrine, Hopkins Professor
Sponsored by the Department of English

This lecture will address the connections between Classical epics, early medieval Biblical epics, and later literature, such as Paradise Lost.

The Art Exhibit will be featured in the Grasselli Library’s Tully Atrium the week of the Celebration.

Thanks to Grasselli Library for coordinating the Art Exhibit. Best of Show winners will receive a gift certificate to the Bookstore as selected by a committee from the John Carroll faculty, student, and staff community.

The Artists Reception will be held on Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 1:00 p.m. in the Grasselli Lobby.

Winners of the 2015 Art Exhibit:

First Place: $50 Bookstore Certificate
Dr. Cynthia Caporella
“Yellow Rose”

Second Place: $30 Bookstore Certificate
Debbie Schmitt
“Pewter Lace”

Third Place: $20 Bookstore Certificate
Yuyang Wang
“Creation of Adam (Adam)”

2015 Artists:

  • Cynthia Caporella
  • Nicolas Sword
  • Louise Barmann
  • Shirin Azadi
  • Sophie Kus
  • Debora Schmitt
  • Mara Esber
  • Diane Ward
  • Ruta Marino
  • Yuyang Wang

Tell Me Quickly!
A Powered by PechaKucha event

Tuesday, April 14, 2015
9:00-11:00 pm in The Underground, Lombardo Student Center

Co-hosted with the Honors Program

Presenters included:

  • Jessica Bou-Anak ’16: “A Little Piece of the Middle East at JCU!”
  • Eleanor Axson ’15: “Learning from Incan Agriculture: How The Inca Accomplished Highly Productive AND Sustainable Farming Before It Was Fashionable.”
  • Ms. Cathy Anson, Director of Sponsored Research: “Bright, Shiny Things”
  • Rebecca Ries-Roncalli ’18: “A Year in Belgium”
  • Dr. Todd Bruce, Director of Assessment: “Wonder Woman: Women and Power from 1941 to Today”
  • Caroline Hall ’16: “A Positive Change: How Yoga Affects Your Mind, Body, and Happiness”
  • Megan Wilson-Reitz, Honors Program Assistant: “Ten Steps for Detoxing the Bible”

Powered by PechaKucha” events are one-off events that are separate from regular city-based PechaKucha Nights, and that are usually held as part of festivals and conferences, but can also act as standalone events. These events include presentations that use the PechaKucha 20 images x 20 seconds format.

Blue and white background promo material to PechaKucha

Congratulations to the following students as recipients of awards in the first Celebration of Scholarship Poster Competition.

The President’s Award:
Poster 47: Steven LaCorte
Mankind’s Greatest Blessing: An Examination of Personal Humor Style and Humor Appreciation in Others

The Provost’s Award:
Poster 35: Katharine Stahon
Age-Dependent Modifications of Axons, Mitochondrial Dynamics, and Ca2+ Homeostasis Underlie the Vulnerability of Aging White Matter to Ischemia

The Deans’ Award:
Poster 01: Megan Martinko
May 4th and Northeast Ohio: How Thirteen Seconds Changed Campus Political Culture

Schedule

Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday

Monday, April 13, 2015

All Week: Celebrate the Art Exhibit
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery

MON 3:30-5 p.m. Faculty Research Reception
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
By Invitation Only

MON 5-6 p.m. Opening Reception for Participants
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
By Invitation Only

MON 5:30-6:30 p.m. Special Event
Early College Poster Session
Dolan Science Center, Muldoon Atrium, Upper Level

MON 5:30-7 p.m. Poster Session
Dolan Science Center, Muldoon Atrium
Refreshments

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Tuesday, April 14, 2015

All Week: Celebrate the Art Exhibit
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery

TUE 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: TRS Student Panel: Engaging Contemporary Issues
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies

TUE 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session A
Dolan Science Center, A202
Moderator: Dr. Cynthia Marco Scanlon, Center for Career Services
(1) Rebecca McMenamin: “How Are Institutions of Higher Education Implementing Transition Courses for Student Veterans? A Pilot Study”
(2) Robert Haas: “Failing the Fagan Cognition Test”
(3) Robert Haas: “Wallace Stevens’s Salvaging”

TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session B
Dolan Science Center, A202
PANEL: Arrupe Scholars 1 of 3
Moderator: Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Scholars Program
Panelists: Markus Creachbaum, Kristen Gittinger, Michael Gong, John Oddo

TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session C
Dolan Science Center, A203
Moderator: Dr. David La Guardia, English
(1) Nickencia Weaver: “The French or the American Care Taker (Nursing) Programs”
(2) Robert Haas: “Wallace Stevens’s Salvaging” See TUES at 3:30 p.m.

TUE 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session D
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
PANEL: Rape Narratives and the Rhetoric of Sexual Violence
Moderator: Dr. Debby Rosenthal, English
(1) Jennifer Vrobel: “Rape, Non-consensual Sex, and Sexual Assault: What is the Difference”
(2) Michael Gong: “Consent: Defining the Undefinable”
(3) William Cameron: “The Rape Epidemic on College Campuses”
(4) Erin Kelley: “Moving Survivor Discourse into the Dominant Discourse”

TUE 7:00 p.m. Public Lecture
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium
“When Christmas Was a Crime: the Nativity Feast during the Puritan Interlewd”
Dr. Joseph Kelly, Theology & Religious Studies

TUE 9-11 p.m. Tell Me Quickly!
A Powered by PechaKucha Event

Lombardo Student Center, The Underground
Sponsored by the Honors Program

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Wednesday, April 15, 2015

All Week: Celebrate the Art Exhibit
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery

WED Noon-1 p.m. Scholarly Lunch
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
(1) Dr. David Mascotti: “Protection from Radicals in the Mitochondria”
(2) Dr. Linda Koch: “The Mystic Lamb at the Portal: Appropriating the New Jerusalem at the Medici Palace, Florence”

WED 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session E
Dolan Science Center, A202
PANEL: Violence and Virginity in Medieval Narratives
Moderator: Dr. Emily Butler, English
(1) Sean Kirby: “​The Destructive Properties of Virginity in Medieval Religious Texts”​
(2) Katie Ours: “‘​She Bore Me to Humankind’​: Birthing a New Model for Medieval Mothers in the Hagiographies of Transvestite Saints”​
(3) Darcy Egan: “Making Contact: Reading Marie de France’s Violent Language in the Lais”

WED 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session F
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
PANEL: Honors Panel 1 of 5
Moderator: Dr. Colin Swearingen, Political Science
(1) Calli Hudock: “Cigarette Tax and its Affect on Smoking Behavior”
(2) Joseph McHugh: “Impact Analysis of Improved Hydrokinetic Project Regulations”
(3) Alexis Mittereder: “The Greenhouse Effect: What is the Relationship between Media Attention and Supreme Court Law Clerk Diversity?”

WED 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session G
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: Explorations of the Social Condition
Moderator: Dr. Gloria Vaquera, Sociology & Criminology
(1) Kenneth Farona: “Food, Ethnicity and Identity: An Exploration of Italian Identity”
(2) Jose “Alex” Esparza: “Church as a Site of Social Capital Acquisition for Immigrants”
(3) Brittany Thompson: “Low-Income Students and the College Experience”
(4) Taylor Hartman: “Body Image Perceptions and Disorders among College Men: The Influences of Identity”

WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session H
Dolan Science Center, A202
PANEL: Arrupe Scholars 2 of 3
Moderator: Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Scholars Program
Panelists: Ned Barnes, Alexandra Higl, Maris Howell, Betsy O’Brien

WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session I
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: Honors Panel 2 of 5
Moderator: Dr. Colin Swearingen, Political Science
(1) Keri Grove: “A Compassion That Can Stand in Awe: Exploring and Addressing Homelessness through Sociological Analyses, Narratives, and Theological Responses”
(2) Brianna Lazarchik: “An Economic Examination of the Re-Structured Education System in New Orleans Ten Years after Hurricane Katrina”
(3) Elizabeth Malloy: “Utilizing ADHD Methods to Support Low Performing Classrooms”
(4) Julia Hohner: “An Evaluation of the Critiques of Liberation Theology”

WED 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session J
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
Moderator: Dr. Pam Mason, College of Arts & Sciences
“Thank You for Flying The Vomit Comet: Using Parabolic Flights to Examine Quantitatively the Stability of Liquid Bridges under Varying Total Body Force”
Dr. Greg DiLisi, Education and School Psychology

WED 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session K
Dolan Science Center, A202
PANEL: Shaping Visions: The Power of Rhetoric
Moderator: Dr. Brent Brossmann, Tim Russert Department of Communication & Theatre Arts
(1) Ellen S. Dietrick: “The Logic Versus Emotion Quandary: An Analysis of Blackfish”
(2) Haley Turner: “Apologia Criticism of Nostra Aetate”
(3) Leah Welker: “Nathan and Women in Leadership”

WED 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session L
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: Living the Mission in the Classroom and the Community: School Counselors Support and Advocate for the Whole Student
Moderator: Dr. Nancy Taylor, Counseling Program
(1) Dr. Nancy Taylor: “What’s YOUR Story?”
(2) Suzana Petkovic: “School Counseling Supervision Strategies Supporting the Whole Person”
(3) Marla Henderson: “Positive Pathways”
(4) Christopher Petitti: “Transactional Analysis and the Whole Person Model”
(5) Bahjah Eckstein: “Advocating the Champion in Every Child”

WED 6:30-7:45 p.m. Special Event
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
Early College Panel Session
Moderator: Dr. Mark Storz, Education and School Psychology
(1) Krista Cobb: “Prescription Painkillers and Over-The-Counter Medication Awareness”
(2) Na’Taeshia Hall: “Mental and Physical Effects of Adolescent Sleep Patterns”
(3) Sivaram Ainkaran: “Calculus’s Applications in Myocardial Infarctions”

WED 7:00 p.m. Public Lecture
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium
“Word for Word? Biblical Epics in Late Antiquity”
By Patrick McBrine, Hopkins Professor
Sponsored by the Department of English

WED 8:00 p.m. Paper/Panel Session M
Lombardo Student Center, Jardine Room
PANEL: We the People Service-Learning Program
Moderator: Liz Deegan, Center for Service & Social Action

WED 9-11 p.m. The Arts at Night
Lombardo Student Center, The Underground
Refreshments

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Thursday, April 16, 2015

All Week: Celebrate the Art Exhibit
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery

THU Noon-1 p.m. Scholarly Lunch
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
(1) Dr. Denise Ben Porath: “Memorial Bias in Eating Disorders: A modification of the dot probe task”
(2) Dr. Scott Allen: “Know, See, Plan, Do – A Curricular Model for Leadership Learning”

THU 1-2 p.m. Meet the Artists Reception
Grasselli Library, Tully Atrium & Gallery
Refreshments

THU 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session N
Dolan Science Center, A202
PANEL: Honors Panel 3 of 5
Moderator: Dr. Erin Johnson, Biology
(1) Mary Skiffey: “What are the effects of circadian rhythms on the G-protein coupled receptors involved with glucose metabolism?”
(2) Alyson Wolk: “Ebola Virus Protein 24 Interactions with Phosphorylated STAT1 Signaling: A Source of Viral Pathogenesis and a Foundation for Novel Therapeutic Interventions”
(3) Tim Weeks: “Mathematical Explorations of Card Tricks”

THU 2-3:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session O
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: TRS Student Panel: Engaging Contemporary Issues
Moderator: Dr. Sheila McGinn, Theology & Religious Studies

THU 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session P
Dolan Science Center, A202
PANEL: Honors Panel 4 of 5
Moderator: Dr. Maria Marsilli, History
(1) Shamir Brice: “A Classy Constitution: Classical Influences on the United States Constitution from Ancient Greece and Roman History and Political Thought”
(2) Stephanie Haas: “If You Can Learn to Do It, I Can Learn to Do It: The Introduction of Humanism to the Court of Henry VII”
(3) Colleen Reilly: “Women in the A​eneid:​Foreign, Female, and a Threat to Traditional Roman Society or Examples of Model Male Citizens?”

THU 3:30-4:45 p.m. Paper/Panel Session Q
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: Latin American Immersion Experiences
Moderator: Anne Mc Ginness, Campus Ministry
Panelists: Julia Hohner, Stephen Politano, Elliott Schermerhorn, Ghada Abushaweesh

THU 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session R
Dolan Science Center, A202
PANEL: Program Evaluation for the Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Cleveland
Moderator: Dr. Penny Harris, Sociology
Panelists: Samantha Bailey, Elizabeth Bencivenni, Mark Berdelle, Ricardo Caraballo, Laura Grasinger, Taylor Hartman, Emma McCarthy, Madeline Metsch, Breahana Phillips, and Brittany Thompson

THU 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session S
Dolan Science Center, A203
PANEL: Arrupe Scholars 3 of 3
Moderator: Dr. Malia McAndrew, Arrupe Scholars Program
Panelists: Katie Coffey, Claire Grega, Elliott Schermerhorn, Nicole Shellenbarger

THU 5-6:15 p.m. Paper/Panel Session T
Dolan Science Center, Donahue Auditorium
PANEL: Honors Panel 5 of 5: Film Panel
Moderator: Dr. Maria Marsilli, History
(1) Ashley Bastock: “School of Hard Knocks”
(2) Hailey Meinen: “Professional Exploration: The Radio Industry”

THU 6:30 p.m. Special Event
Dolan Science Center, O’Connell Reading Room
Porter Scholarship Reception
By Invitation Only

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Friday, April 17, 2015