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Within Academic Affairs, a subset of University Learning Goals has been selected to serve as the Academic Learning Goals, which inform and direct the Integrative Core Curriculum.

John Carroll University graduates will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of human and natural worlds
  • Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation
  • Apply creative and innovative thinking
  • Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression
  • Act competently in a global and diverse world
  • Understand and promote social justice
  • Apply a framework for examining ethical dilemmas
  • Employ leadership and collaborative skills
  • Understand the religious dimensions of human experience.

These nine goals drive the Integrative Core Curriculum as described below:

Foundational Competencies: Written Expression

Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression

  1. Articulate an argument (Select and develop a manageable topic, given audience, purpose, and length requirements; and develop and support an argument appropriate to context, audience, and purpose)
  2. Integrate sources (locate, engage with, and integrate textual sources)
  3. Document sources ethically (formulate citations and avoid plagiarism)
  4. Control surface features of writing (use language that generally conveys meaning to readers with clarity, although writing may include some errors.)

Foundational Competencies: Oral Expression

Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation (critical analysis)

  1. Articulate a defensible thesis in argumentative, informative and persuasive speeches
  2. Support the speeches with appropriate, credible evidence
  3. Understand differences in audiences and occasions and adapt the content, structure, language choice and delivery of the presentation appropriately
  4. Develop critical listening skills for the purpose of evaluating presentations

Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation (aesthetic appreciation)

  1. Employ design principles in creating appropriate and effective visual aids
  2. Employ language effectively in wording speeches

Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression

  1. Create speeches which are meaningful and appropriate to a particular audience
  2. Demonstrate polished delivery including effective eye contact, vocal variety, gestures and movement
  3. Display skill in answering public questions about a presentation

Apply a framework for examining ethical dilemmas

  1. Employ the notion of a “good person speaking well” by demonstrating ethical responsibility in all areas of speaking, including goals, research, language choice and presentation
  2. Avoid plagiarizing sources.

Learn ways to integrate public speaking and technology.

  1. Understand the role of technology in creating and presenting effective visual aids to augment speeches
  2. Demonstrate visual aids during a presentation using their own technological devices as the display medium
  3. Use appropriate databases and internet sites to access a wide variety of resources
  4. Speak effectively to a distant audience via a visual medium

Foundational Competencies: Quantitative Analysis

Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation

  1. Find and pose precise questions that can be appropriately analyzed by quantitative methods
  2. Draw inference from data
  3. Represent data
  4. Think critically about quantitative statements
  5. Recognize sources of error

Apply creative and innovative thinking

  1. Draw inference from data

Languages

Act competently in a global and diverse world

  1. Communicate skillfully and effectively in a language other than English, at a level commensurate with the language and program. (Classical levels are explained in more detail here.)
  2. Demonstrate foundational cultural and linguistic knowledge of a target-language area.
  3. Demonstrate emerging intercultural competence

Distributive Courses: Humanities Experience

Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the human and natural worlds (Understand the perspectives of science, social science, and humanities)

  1. Offer informed interpretations of texts, art, or other cultural products or practices within their social, cultural, and/or historical contexts.

Distributive Courses: Natural Science Experience

Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the human and natural worlds (Understand the perspectives of science, social science, and humanities)

  1. Demonstrate scientific literacy by effective communication of concepts and processes within the discipline

Distributive Courses: Social Science Experience

Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the human and natural worlds (Understand the perspectives of science, social science, and humanities)

  1. Demonstrate how social science insights and approaches can be used to understand contemporary social, economic, or political issues

Integrated Courses: Engaging the Global Community

Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the human and natural worlds

  1. Draw conclusions by connecting examples, facts, or theories from more than one field of study or perspective
  2. Apply skills, abilities, theories or methodologies gained in one situation to contribute to their understanding of a problem or issue

Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression (writing)

  1. Articulating an Argument: The writer locates and develops a manageable topic given audience, purpose, and length requirements and begins to situate the topic in the context of the field. The writer develops and supports an argument appropriate to context, audience, and purpose;
  2. Integrating Sources: The writer locates, engages with, and integrates credible and relevant sources appropriate to the discipline;
  3. Documenting Ethically: The writer avoids plagiarism and documents sources consistently using a citation style appropriate to the discipline with few formatting errors;
  4. Controlling Surface Features: The writer uses straightforward language that conveys meaning to readers with clarity, with few errors.

Act competently in a global and diverse world

  1. Identify several factors that resulted in social cultural, economic, political or environmental linkages between people at regional and/or global levels;
  2. Describe the reciprocal power relationships that result from these linkages.

Integrated Courses: Linked Courses

Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the human and natural worlds

  1. Draw conclusions by connecting examples, facts, or theories from more than one field of study or perspective
  2. Apply skills, abilities, theories or methodologies gained in one situation to contribute to their understanding of a problem or issue

Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation

  1. Demonstrate the ability to think critically about a real-world problem, issue, intellectual question, or idea (critical thinking includes identifying and describing the fundamental elements of a problem/issue/question/idea and interpreting relevant data)

Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression (writing)

  1. Articulating an Argument: The writer locates and develops a manageable topic given audience, purpose, and length requirements and begins to situate the topic in the context of the field. The writer develops and supports an argument appropriate to context, audience, and purpose;
  2. Integrating Sources: The writer locates, engages with, and integrates credible and relevant sources appropriate to the discipline;
  3. Documenting Ethically: The writer avoids plagiarism and documents sources consistently using a citation style appropriate to the discipline with few formatting errors;
  4. Controlling Surface Features: The writer uses straightforward language that conveys meaning to readers with clarity, with few errors.

Jesuit Heritage: Philosophy (Knowledge and Reality Courses)

Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the human and natural world

  1. Acquire knowledge about human experience*

Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation

  1. Identify and understand the fundamental elements of a problem.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to analyze multiple forms of expression (such as oral, written, digital, or visual)
  3. Develop critical thinking skills

Jesuit Heritage: Philosophy (Values and Society Courses)

Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the human and natural world

  1. Acquire knowledge about human experience*

Apply a framework for examining ethical dilemmas

  1. Identify ethical questions.
  2. Analyze and assess ethical theories
  3. Apply personal frameworks to personal, professional, and institutional dilemmas

Jesuit Heritage: Theology and Religious Studies

Understand the religious dimensions of human experience; Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation; and Act competently in a global and diverse world

  1. Critically analyze the culturally and globally diverse dimensions of religious experience as expressed in sacred texts, art, ritual practices, and ethical commitments.

Understand and promote social justice; and Act competently in a global and diverse world

  1. Appreciate how culturally and globally diverse religious traditions provide resources for responding to injustice and living ethically.

Jesuit Heritage: Issues in Social Justice

Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of the human and natural worlds

  1. Acquire knowledge about the human experience. Included herein may be how the natural world has shaped the human experience, particularly as it applies to issues of social justice.*

Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation

  1. Demonstrate the ability to analyze multiple forms of expression such as oral, written, digital, or visual.*
  2. Demonstrate the ability to think critically about a real-world problem or intellectual question (critical thinking includes identifying and describing the fundamental elements of a problem/question, and the ability to interpret relevant data).*

Understand and promote social justice

  1. Communicate understanding of and respect for differences between individuals and across cultures.
  2. Understand the historical/structural conditions that have given rise to injustice.
  3. Recognize an injustice and articulates the consequence of that injustice.

Jesuit Heritage: Creative and Performing Arts

Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation

  1. Demonstrate the ability to analyze multiple forms of expression (such as oral, written, digital or visual)
  2. Develop critical thinking skills
  3. Articulate an appreciation and understanding of the arts as human endeavors through a consideration of or engagement in the creative process

Apply creative and innovative thinking

  1. Respect innovation and creativity by demonstrating a basic conceptual analysis of aesthetic expression

Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression

  1. Understanding and demonstrating the diverse nature, meanings and functions of creative endeavors through the study and practice of literature, music, theatrical and visual arts and related forms of expression

Contact Us

Todd Bruce, Ph.D.
Assistant Provost for Institutional Effectiveness and Advising
AD 133D
216.397.1600

Carey Ann Lopuchovsky
AD 140
216.397.6618