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In 2014, the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Cultures established a set of learning goals that align with University Learning Goals and form the basis of the assessment of student learning in the department. The University-wide learning goals most directly supported by the department are:

  • Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression
  • Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of human and natural worlds
  • Act competently in a global and diverse world

CMLC Departmental Learning Goal 1: Students can communicate skillfully and effectively in a language other than English, at a level commensurate with the language and program.

Upon graduation, departmental majors and minors will be able to:

  1. Engage in effective interpersonal communication (modern languages);
  2. Engage in effective interpretive listening (modern languages);
  3. Engage in effective interpretive reading (modern and classical languages);
  4. Engage in effective presentational speaking (modern and classical languages);
  5. Engage in effective presentational writing (modern and classical languages).

CMLC Departmental Learning Goal 2: Students can demonstrate foundational cultural and linguistic knowledge of a target-language area.

Upon graduation, departmental majors and minors will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of features of the culture of a target-language area, such as its art, literature, music, film, popular culture, tradition, and customs (modern and classical languages);
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of how aspects of the history, politics, religion, or geography of a target-language area relate to its culture (modern and classical languages);
  3. Read and analyze cultural texts (modern and classical languages);

CMLC Departmental Learning Goal 3: Students can demonstrate emerging intercultural competence.

Upon graduation, departmental majors and minors will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an awareness of the interplay of personal identity and culture (modern and classical languages);
  2. Interpret an event, cultural product, or issue from the perspective of a worldview outside their own (modern and classical languages).