Skip to main content

Student Services

FAQs

What math classes do I need to take?

Every John Carroll Student is required to complete one Division IV Mathematics (MT) course as part of the University Core Curriculum requirements. Math courses that satisfy the core requirement are indicated by a “IV” in the Div/Req column in the Schedule of Classes.

Some majors have particular math course requirements.

Regardless of their major, students should consult with their advisors and the Undergraduate Bulletin before registering for any mathematics course. For those students taking Calculus, the sequence MT 133 – MT 134 can be used to replace a requirement of MT 135.

Students majoring in programs that do not require a specific mathematics class may choose from MT 118 (Applied Mathematics), MT 122 (Elementary Statistics I), MT 135 (Calculus), MT 160 (Mathematics and Creativity), MT 162 (Mathematics from Nonwestern Cultures), and MT 130 (Applied Calculus)

If you plan to do this

You must take these math courses

When you should take your first math class

Major in Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology,or Environmental Science

MT 135 (Calculus) and MT 228 (Biostatistics)

PreMed: First semester, Freshman year; Others: By first semester sophomore year

Major in Business(Accountancy, Business Information Systems, Business Logistics, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing)

MT 130 (Applied Calculus) or MT 135 (Calculus). Students who have a strong background in mathematics, or who plan to attend graduate programs in Economics or Finance, are strongly encouraged to take Calculus.

Freshman year

Minor in Business

MT 122 (Elementary Statistics I)

Freshman or Sophomore year

Major in Chemistry or Biochemistry;
Minor in Chemistry

MT 135 (Calculus) and additional courses. See the Department of Chemistry undergraduate programs pages for more information.

First semester, Freshman year

Major or minor in Computer Science or Computer Information Systems

MT 118 (Applied Mathematics) or MT 135 (Calculus)

Freshman year

Major in Early Childhood Education

MT 160 (Mathematics and Creativity) or MT 200 (Explorations in Mathematics); and MT 171/171L (Foundations of Early Childhood Mathematics)

Freshman or sophomore year

Major in Mathematics or Teaching Mathematics;
Minor in Mathematics;Minor in Statistics

MT 135 (Calculus) and/or MT 200 (Explorations in Mathematics). See the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science undergraduate programs pages for more information.

First semester, Freshman year

Major in Middle Childhood Education with Mathematics Curriculum Content

MT 160 (Mathematics and Creativity) or MT 200 (Explorations in Mathematics); MT 135 (Calculus), and additional courses. See the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science undergraduate programs pages for more information.

First semester, Freshman year

Major in Physics, Engineering Physics, or Interdisciplinary Physics
Minor in Physics and Engineering Physics

MT 135 (Calculus) and additional courses. See the Department of Physics degree programs pagefor more information.

First semester, Freshman year

Major or minor in Psychology

MT 122, MT 223 (Elementary Statistics and intermediate Statistics)

Freshman or Sophomore year

Major in Sociology

MT 122 (Elementary Statistics I)

Freshman or Sophomore year

If you will be taking calculus (MT 133/4/5/6) and you do not already own a TI-82, TI-83, or TI-84 calculator, then you should buy a TI-83, TI-83 Plus, or TI-84 Plus. Please do not plan to use a calculator other than the models listed above, since your instructor will be assuming that you will have one of those models. In particular, calculators such as the TI-81 and TI-85 do not have all of the features of the TI-82/3/4 that you will need in the course.

If you will be taking third-semester calculus (MT 233), you should check with your instructor before purchasing a new calculator. Students in other mathematics and statistics courses will need a scientific (but not necessarily a graphing) calculator. Most instructors will not allow the use of calculators having symbolic manipulation capability, such as the TI-89, TI-Nspire CAS, or TI-92.

The TI-83 Plus and TI-84 Plus are essentially the same as the TI-83. Their main added feature is a “flash memory” that can be upgraded over the internet by connecting to the Texas Instruments web site. This assures that the calculator can be upgraded whenever TI releases a new version of the calculator’s operating system. The TI-84 Plus is also somewhat faster. The “Silver Edition” of these calculators comes with a USB link cable that can be used to connect the calculator to a computer. The TI-83 Plus and TI-84 Plus can be found at most stores that sell graphing calculators.

If you are uncertain about the course you will be taking, please wait until you register before buying your calculator.

All peer tutoring in math, statistics, computer science, and data science will be managed by the Learning Commons.  The Learning Commons is staffed by tutoring professionals, graduate assistants, and advanced undergraduate students, and is available on a walk-in basis.

You must be a John Carroll student in order to use these Peer Learning Services.

Check the Learning Commons web page  for hours of operation.  Check for updates throughout the first few weeks of the semester.

The University has a number of computer labs for student use.

One of these labs, in Dolan E223, is reserved for students to use in conjunction with the computer science or mathematics courses they are taking this semester. This lab also serves as a Tutoring Center for students taking CS courses.

For work not related to a CS or MT class, please use one of the general-use labs, such as the one in Dolan E337.

Mathematics and Computer Science PC Lab, Dolan E223

All peer tutoring in math, statistics, computer science, and data science, which used to be in the PC Lab, Dolan E223, will be managed by the Learning Commons this year. Check the Learning Commons web page for hours of operation.

Please note that this lab may periodically close for use by a class during these hours.

For work not related to a CS or MT class or at times when the MT/CS lab is not open, please use one of the general-use computer labs, such as the one in Dolan E337. This lab is open only as indicated above.

Welcome to ISEP, an interactive statistics package designed to help college students learn statistics at the introductory level. Please note that to be able to run the following pages your computer must have a browser capable of supporting applets written with JDK1.1.5. Also for best results, your machine should be IBM-PC compatible with 133 MHz Pentium or higher.

The following lessons are designed to be very vague in nature. This is to allow the students to discover the statistical concepts for themselves. Also this is not to be considered a stand alone product. ISEP was designed with the intention that students would be provided with some instructions, questions, and goals by their supervising professor.

Please choose a lesson to start with. Also, please note to return from any of the lower pages simply click on the “BACK” button provided by the browser.

Lesson 1: Mean
Lesson 2: Standard Deviation
Lesson 3: Linear Regression
Lesson 4: Central Limit Theorem
Lesson 5: Power
Lesson 6: Monty Hall
Lesson 7: Triangle Inequality Theorem
Lesson 8: Confidence Interval
Lesson 9: Quincunx