Skip to main content
Students at MELT Program at Fall Retreat

The goal of MELT is to contribute to the advancement of first-year students by aiding in their academic, emotional, and social adjustment, and personal development. This happens by training peer mentors to assist mentees in developing confidence and positive attitudes about learning; respecting and involving mentees in decisions about their education and learning process; supporting and praising mentees for their efforts rather than criticizing them; and seeking to understand the psychological, emotional, and physical problems that may cause historically underrepresented students to have difficulty at John Carroll.

  • The Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion will recruit students to participate in the MELT at New Student Orientation sessions, the Multicultural Welcome Celebration, the Student Involvement Fair, through the Center webpage, and in-person/online methods (email, social media, etc.).
  • MELT will foster a caring mentoring partnership between current students and incoming students; particularly students who are first in their immediate families to go to college, students of color, LGBTQ+ students, and other historically underrepresented students.
  • MELT will train peer mentors at the beginning of every fall and spring semester.
  • MELT will host monthly group socials every fall and spring semester.
  • The Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion will recruit peer mentors in the spring semester using their webpage and in-person/online methods (email, social media, etc.).
  • Participants in the Peer Mentoring Program will list and describe their points of individual contact using the Monthly Contact Reports (knowledge and comprehensive cognitive learning).
  • Mentees will evaluate peer mentors at the end of each semester using the Peer Mentor Evaluation Tool (evaluation cognitive learning).
  • The Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion will assess the Peer Mentoring Program using the Monthly Contact Reports and Peer Mentor Evaluations (evaluation cognitive learning).

The development and implementation of the MELT is aligned with the University’s Learning Goals of Character and Leadership. Moreover, MELT is linked to the University’s Strategic Plan Initiatives of (1) Academic Excellence: Student Thriving and (2) Faith that Does Justice: Inclusive Excellence Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue.

Mentor of the Month: Sally Al-Qaraghuli! Maryum Ali has nominated our next featured mentor, Sally Al-Qaraghuli! Here's what Maryum had to say about Sally, "Sally truly cares about her mentees and provides honest and thought out answers when asked a question. She is incredibly experienced in everything and is a person to look up to in terms of the amount of leadership positions that she has. She is an inspiration and really wants her mentees to do the best they can. Sally has a warm presence and instantly becomes friends with whoever she meets, which is a quality I only wish I had. I am so excited to learn more from her in the coming year and am so happy I got paired with her as a mentee!" Congrats, Sally!

Mentee Registration for the 2020-21 school year is always open and you can click here to register or contact Angela Aviquivil at aaviquivil19@jcu.edu with questions. 

Who can be a mentee?

Any incoming first-year students can participate in the Peer Mentoring Program as “mentees.” Particular focus is made to recruit mentees who are first in their immediate families to go to college, students of color, LGBTQ+ students, and other historically underrepresented students.

What is a mentee?

A mentee can be any incoming student who believes that they could benefit from a mentoring relationship.

Mentees might want support in developing the necessary confidence needed to transition from high school to college. Mentees can also be students seeking peers to help them explore, develop, and reinforce their cultural identity development through one-on-one meetings, campus lectures, cultural student organizations, etc. Lastly, mentees might also be students needing a peer to help them explore choices and decisions like major and minor options; on-campus employment; recreation; internships; careers; student organizations; student leadership; and service-learning opportunities.

When does participation in the program happen?

MELT is year-round.

Recruitment for mentees takes place at New Student Orientation, at the Multicultural Welcome Celebration, and the Involvement Fair.

Where does participation in the program happen?

Mentees and their peer mentors are required to brainstorm, negotiate, and agree to the best dates, times, and manners to meet (i.e. in-person, phone, text, etc.) with their mentees during the fall and spring semester.

Why become a mentee?

New students benefit from participating in the Peer Mentoring Program in the following ways: improved grades from study tables; decreased probability of academic probation; reduced attrition; making important first connections on campus; bridging from parents to independence; access to peer advice; and gaining positive role models across a span of years.

 

The Mentor Application is temporarily closed for the 2020-21 school year. Check back in early October for recruitment information. 

Who can be a peer mentor?

Current sophomore, junior, or senior students who participate are known as “peer mentors.” Peer mentors become part of the program by applying online and completing an interview process. Peer mentors are trained to take on the responsibility of assisting incoming first-year students in their growth and development by providing academic and personal support. Interested students can review the full job description by clicking here.

What is a peer mentor?

The Peer Mentor serves in a part-time, nine-month position and reports to the Director of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion. Peer mentors engage in direct contact with historically underrepresented students in order for them to become successful and fully engaged in all aspects of their educational experiences at John Carroll University. Moreover, peer mentors contribute to the advancement of first-year students by aiding in their academic, emotional, social adjustment, and personal development.

What are the peer mentor learning goals?

Peer mentors will be able to:

  • Practice helping skills to help mentees develop confidence and positive attitudes about learning.
  • Show respect and involve mentees in decisions about their education and learning process.
  • Show support and praise mentees for their efforts rather than criticizing them.
  • Interpret and seek to understand the psychological, emotional, and physical problems that may cause historically underrepresented students to have difficulty at John Carroll.
  • Employ the cultural identity development of mentees by encouraging participation in campus events, lectures, workshops, etc.

What is expected of Peer Mentors?

Prior to being matched with a mentee, peer mentors must attend the mandatory training in April and complete online trainings over the summer.

During the school year, peer mentors are required to meet with their mentee(s) weekly. Peer mentors are evaluated at the end of each semester by their mentees. Finally, peer mentors are expected to record and submit their monthly contact observations by the 7th of each month.

Why become a peer mentor?

Peer mentors benefit from the intrinsic value that comes from helping others. They make a personal connection with new students to overcome practical considerations that faculty and staff cannot meet when connecting with every student. Peer mentors also create cross-level connections across the student body, which can be durable and long-lasting. Lastly, peer mentors establish relationships between new students, faculty, and staff that are oriented towards personal and academic development, without the pressure of being graded.

Participation as a peer mentor in MELT becomes an attractive résumé highlight, demonstrating development and growth in leadership, communication, and crisis intervention skills. Moreover, peer mentors enjoy the fringe benefits of para-professional experience in the field of higher education and student affairs services; free training in specialized areas in the field of higher education and student affairs services; increased understanding and appreciation of different values and lifestyles; and increased skill in creative problem solving.

Participants

All students enrolled at John Carroll University can participate in the program:

  • Incoming first-year students who participate are known as “mentees.” Mentees become part of the program by registering online at any time throughout the summer or school year.
  • Current sophomore, junior, or senior students who participate are known as “peer mentors.” Peer mentors become part of the program by applying online and completing an interview process. Peer mentors are trained on taking the responsibility of assisting incoming students in their growth and development by providing academic and personal support.

Mentoring

Mentoring is a trusting and helpful relationship between an older and younger individual. The purpose of having a mentoring relationship in college is to assist students with the challenges associated with the first-year college experience.

MELT fosters the creation of trusting and helpful relationships among students across different ages, backgrounds, majors, and experiences. Moreover, MELT strives to positively contribute to the advancement of first-year students by aiding in their academic, emotional, and social adjustments in college. This is achieved by creating a meaningful sense of community through mentee and peer mentor partnerships. Peer mentors build relationships with mentees by sharing their time and knowledge of resources at John Carroll and the greater-Cleveland area.

Timeline

MELT is year-round! Peer mentors are expected to meet weekly with mentees.

Connecting

Mentors and mentees are required to be in contact weekly. Each peer mentor and mentee negotiate when is best to meet individually.